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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?


Hi,

What are the ingredient differences in the two above cheesecakes?

child


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Sheldon
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?


wrote:
>
> What are the ingredient differences in the two above cheesecakes?


H2O

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Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 23:51:14 -0500, "Dee Randall"
> wrote:

>I thought someone here said that "New York Cheesecake" and "regular
>cheesecake," are one and the same. Then, what IS the name of the "other"
>cheesecake? i.e., NY cheecake aka regular cheesecake vs. .........?
>I, myself, have googled NY cheesecake recipes, but I'm not sure what the
>specific google word would be for the "other cheesecake than NY cheesecake."
>Can you give a specific? What IS the different kind other than NY
>cheesecake/regular cheesecake?


I believe that NY cheesecake is more dense and firm than that other
stuff. I can't stand fluffy cheesecake.

Carol
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

On Thu 19 Jan 2006 09:51:14p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

>
> "Andy" <q> wrote in message ...
>> "Nancy1" > wrote in news:1137703317.755900.91480
>> @g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
>>
>>>
>>> wrote:
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> What are the ingredient differences in the two above cheesecakes?
>>>>
>>>> child
>>>
>>> Here's a clue - Google for recipes for the two different kinds, and
>>> you'll have done your own research.
>>>
>>> N.

>
>
> I thought someone here said that "New York Cheesecake" and "regular
> cheesecake," are one and the same. Then, what IS the name of the
> "other" cheesecake? i.e., NY cheecake aka regular cheesecake vs.
> .........? I, myself, have googled NY cheesecake recipes, but I'm not
> sure what the specific google word would be for the "other cheesecake
> than NY cheesecake." Can you give a specific? What IS the different kind
> other than NY cheesecake/regular cheesecake?


Well, Dee, you know that there are a *lot* of different typs of cheesecake.
Many would agree that one difference is New York Cheesecake has a pastry
bottom and sides whereas few others do. There's truly no single "regular"
cheesecake, as you'll find many regional differences and many differences
within the same regions. Another characteristic of New York Cheesecake is
the heavy, solid texture and high content of cream cheese. This may or may
not be shared by other versions. Regional concepts of "New York
Cheesecake" can vary signifcantly, too. I have ordered "New York
Cheesecake" that was revoltingly fluffy, with a crumb crust, and horrible
flavor. God only knows what was in it. New York Cheesecake is almost in
the genre of Caesar Salad. There is basically one type and everything else
is positively *not*. "Regular cheesecake"? No such thing.

--
Wayne Boatwright տլ
________________________________________

Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!

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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

On Thu 19 Jan 2006 10:02:36p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Damsel in
dis Dress?

> On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 23:51:14 -0500, "Dee Randall"
> > wrote:
>
>>I thought someone here said that "New York Cheesecake" and "regular
>>cheesecake," are one and the same. Then, what IS the name of the
>>"other" cheesecake? i.e., NY cheecake aka regular cheesecake vs.
>>.........? I, myself, have googled NY cheesecake recipes, but I'm not
>>sure what the specific google word would be for the "other cheesecake
>>than NY cheesecake." Can you give a specific? What IS the different kind
>>other than NY cheesecake/regular cheesecake?

>
> I believe that NY cheesecake is more dense and firm than that other
> stuff. I can't stand fluffy cheesecake.
>
> Carol
>


Neither can I. One should be able to use it for construcint walls.

--
Wayne Boatwright տլ
________________________________________

Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!

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Jen
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?


"Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
28.19...
> On Thu 19 Jan 2006 09:51:14p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
> Randall?
>
>>
>> "Andy" <q> wrote in message ...
>>> "Nancy1" > wrote in news:1137703317.755900.91480
>>> @g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> What are the ingredient differences in the two above cheesecakes?
>>>>>
>>>>> child



The only differences I knew of cheesecakes, was baked and unbaked. Is that
another difference as well?

Jen


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Dee Randall
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?


"Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
28.19...
> On Thu 19 Jan 2006 09:51:14p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
> Randall?
>
>>
>> "Andy" <q> wrote in message ...
>>> "Nancy1" > wrote in news:1137703317.755900.91480
>>> @g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> What are the ingredient differences in the two above cheesecakes?
>>>>>
>>>>> child
>>>>
>>>> Here's a clue - Google for recipes for the two different kinds, and
>>>> you'll have done your own research.
>>>>
>>>> N.

>>
>>
>> I thought someone here said that "New York Cheesecake" and "regular
>> cheesecake," are one and the same. Then, what IS the name of the
>> "other" cheesecake? i.e., NY cheecake aka regular cheesecake vs.
>> .........? I, myself, have googled NY cheesecake recipes, but I'm not
>> sure what the specific google word would be for the "other cheesecake
>> than NY cheesecake." Can you give a specific? What IS the different kind
>> other than NY cheesecake/regular cheesecake?

>
> Well, Dee, you know that there are a *lot* of different typs of
> cheesecake.
> Many would agree that one difference is New York Cheesecake has a pastry
> bottom and sides whereas few others do. There's truly no single "regular"
> cheesecake, as you'll find many regional differences and many differences
> within the same regions. Another characteristic of New York Cheesecake is
> the heavy, solid texture and high content of cream cheese. This may or
> may
> not be shared by other versions. Regional concepts of "New York
> Cheesecake" can vary signifcantly, too. I have ordered "New York
> Cheesecake" that was revoltingly fluffy, with a crumb crust, and horrible
> flavor. God only knows what was in it. New York Cheesecake is almost in
> the genre of Caesar Salad. There is basically one type and everything
> else
> is positively *not*. "Regular cheesecake"? No such thing.
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright տլ



Thanks, Wayne,
I'm thinking of making a cheesecake using all the dairy items I now have
accumulated for the below recipe. Maybe Saturday; tomorrow is my last day of
a bunch of PT appointments. Phew!

So many questions, and I have read a lot of the caveats.

DH doesn't like a cheesecake with the graham cracker crust, but I know him
too well, he'll eat anything! I don't know what to think of this recipe
that uses NO crust.

I was thinking that I'd have to buy a new pan, but I found in my storage
room a 9" crappo aluminum springform pan and a 12" beatup bain marie pan
that I can set it in -- so it seems that I've been there before. I don't
know what difference a 9" springform pan will make with this recipe. A 8x2
round will hold 7 cups; a 9x2 will hold 8 cups, and a 9x3 will hold 12 cups.

Here is the recipe I will use, but will not use Splenda, but will use sugar
instead. Any suggestions as to whether I should use less/more sugar?

I found some "OLD" unopened Pam spray, but I do have now an "Olive Oil"
spray, so am wondering which to use. Actually I would prefer butter, but
would that make a difference to the rise?

This is the recipe I've decided on; I want to use all these ingredients,
but I'm wondering, will it be firm, or fluffy? I would guess fluffy, but
will fluffy be ok with no crust? Probably so.
Thanks for any comments.
Anxious-ly,
Dee Dee

Low Carb New York Ricotta Cheesecake Recipe courtesy George Stella

Show: Low Carb and Lovin' It Episode: Deceiving Desserts





Prep Time: 30 minutes

Inactive Prep Time: 8 hours

Cook Time: 1 hour 45 minutes

Yield: 12 servings






24 ounces cream cheese, softened

1 cup extra-fine whole milk ricotta cheese (to refine, process in a food
processor for 1 minute)

1/2 cup sour cream

1 1/2 cups sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)

1/3 cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon no sugar added vanilla extract

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 eggs

3 egg yolks



Special Equipment: 1 (8-inch) springform cake pan





Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Spray the springform pan with nonstick vegetable oil cooking spray. Set
aside. In a shallow roasting pan big enough to fit the cake pan, pour about
1-inch of water and place it on the center rack of the oven to preheat.



In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat softened cream cheese, ricotta, sour
cream and sugar substitute on low speed for about 1 minute until well
blended.



In a separate bowl, using a wire whisk, mix heavy cream, vanilla, lemon
juice, eggs, and egg yolks until blended.



Turn the mixer on medium speed, and slowly pour the egg mixture into the
cream cheese mixture. Beat just until blended and then turn off; be careful
not to over-whip.



Pour batter into the greased springform pan. Place pan into the heated water
bath. Bake for 15 minutes, and then lower the oven temperature to 275
degrees F. Continue baking for 1 1/2 hours, or until top is light golden
brown and cake is pulling away from the sides of the pan. Turn the oven off
when finished cooking and leave the cake in the oven to cool for 3 more
hours. (This will keep the cake nice and tall.) Then remove cake and
refrigerate before serving. Serve chilled.






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Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 00:59:53 -0500, "Dee Randall"
> wrote:

>DH doesn't like a cheesecake with the graham cracker crust, but I know him
>too well, he'll eat anything! I don't know what to think of this recipe
>that uses NO crust.


Line the bottom of the springform pan with parchment paper. Voila!

This thread has gotten me hungry for cheesecake, so I'm making a
Splenda version of one later today, too.

Carol
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

On Thu 19 Jan 2006 10:59:53p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

> Thanks, Wayne,
> I'm thinking of making a cheesecake using all the dairy items I now have
> accumulated for the below recipe. Maybe Saturday; tomorrow is my last
> day of a bunch of PT appointments. Phew!


Glad you're at the end of that!

> So many questions, and I have read a lot of the caveats.


I'll comment throughout...

> DH doesn't like a cheesecake with the graham cracker crust, but I know
> him too well, he'll eat anything! I don't know what to think of this
> recipe that uses NO crust.


I baked my first cheesecake when I was around 15 and, as it happens, it also
did not have a crust. What I do with that recipe now is heavily butter both
the bottom and sides of the pan, then add a few spoonsful of graham cracker
crumbs and toss 'til the surface is just coated, then dump out the rest.
It's still relatively low carb and looks much nicer.

> I was thinking that I'd have to buy a new pan, but I found in my storage
> room a 9" crappo aluminum springform pan and a 12" beatup bain marie pan
> that I can set it in -- so it seems that I've been there before. I
> don't know what difference a 9" springform pan will make with this
> recipe. A 8x2 round will hold 7 cups; a 9x2 will hold 8 cups, and a 9x3
> will hold 12 cups.


The 9-inch pan will be fine. I'm sure you know this, but when using a
springform pan set in a bain marie, make sure you securely wrap the exterior
in heavy foil. This will insure that water will not invade the pan through
the seam.

> Here is the recipe I will use, but will not use Splenda, but will use
> sugar instead. Any suggestions as to whether I should use less/more
> sugar?


Use only 1 cup. Taste it, but I doubt you'll need more. I'm surprised at
the amount of Splenda your recipe calls for because, IMHO, Splenda tastes
sweeter than sugar volume for volume. For the amount of batter, I think 1
cup is sweet enough.

> I found some "OLD" unopened Pam spray, but I do have now an "Olive Oil"
> spray, so am wondering which to use. Actually I would prefer butter,
> but would that make a difference to the rise?


Cheesecakes don't rise that much. Actually, butter would probably inhibit
any expected rise less than Pam. For god's sake, don't use anything labeled
"Olive Oil" for fear of adding that flavor.

> This is the recipe I've decided on; I want to use all these
> ingredients, but I'm wondering, will it be firm, or fluffy? I would
> guess fluffy, but will fluffy be ok with no crust? Probably so.
> Thanks for any comments.
> Anxious-ly,
> Dee Dee


It will be firm. See further comments within recipe...

> Low Carb New York Ricotta Cheesecake Recipe courtesy George Stella
>
> Show: Low Carb and Lovin' It Episode: Deceiving Desserts
>
>
>
>
>
> Prep Time: 30 minutes
>
> Inactive Prep Time: 8 hours
>
> Cook Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
>
> Yield: 12 servings
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 24 ounces cream cheese, softened
>
> 1 cup extra-fine whole milk ricotta cheese (to refine, process in a food
> processor for 1 minute)


This will work, but I find I get a better texture if I press the ricotta
through a *fine* sieve.

> 1/2 cup sour cream
>
> 1 1/2 cups sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)


As noted above, use only 1 cup.

> 1/3 cup heavy cream
>
> 1 tablespoon no sugar added vanilla extract
>
> 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
>
> 2 eggs
>
> 3 egg yolks
>
>
>
> Special Equipment: 1 (8-inch) springform cake pan
>
>
>
>
>
> Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
>
> Spray the springform pan with nonstick vegetable oil cooking spray. Set
> aside. In a shallow roasting pan big enough to fit the cake pan, pour
> about 1-inch of water and place it on the center rack of the oven to
> preheat.
>
>
>
> In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat softened cream cheese, ricotta,
> sour cream and sugar substitute on low speed for about 1 minute until
> well blended.
>
>
>
> In a separate bowl, using a wire whisk, mix heavy cream, vanilla, lemon
> juice, eggs, and egg yolks until blended.


Do not whisk enough for the mixture to become frothy.

> Turn the mixer on medium speed, and slowly pour the egg mixture into the
> cream cheese mixture. Beat just until blended and then turn off; be
> careful not to over-whip.


Keep the mixer on *low* speed. You want to incorporate as little air as
possible.

> Pour batter into the greased springform pan. Place pan into the heated
> water bath. Bake for 15 minutes, and then lower the oven temperature to
> 275 degrees F. Continue baking for 1 1/2 hours, or until top is light
> golden brown and cake is pulling away from the sides of the pan. Turn
> the oven off when finished cooking and leave the cake in the oven to
> cool for 3 more hours. (This will keep the cake nice and tall.) Then
> remove cake and refrigerate before serving. Serve chilled.


Sounds like a pretty good recipe. I think I'll give it a go myself. Post
back with your results, please.

--
Wayne Boatwright տլ
________________________________________

Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!

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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

On Fri 20 Jan 2006 07:44:02a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
Randall?

>
> "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
> 28.19...
>> On Thu 19 Jan 2006 10:59:53p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
>> Randall?
>>
>>> Thanks, Wayne,
>>> I'm thinking of making a cheesecake using all the dairy items I now
>>> have accumulated for the below recipe. Maybe Saturday; ...

>
> Yes, it will be a 'go' for Saturday.
>
> Thanks,Wayne for all the remarks. I like all the suggestions. They are
> ones I can do. Regarding the graham cracker coating up the sides, please
> give your suggestion.
>
>
> I will stay away from the Pam & olive oil but use heavily buttered pan
> with slight amount of graham craccker crumbs tossed onto bottom (and up
> the sides as like flouring/coating a pan?),


Yes, exactly like flouring a pan.

> PRESS ricotta thru a fine sieve,
> USE 1 cup of sugar instead of Splenda,
> WHEN whisking egg mixture, do not whisk to a frothiness,
> SET speed 1 on my KitchenAid stand mixer so as to not incorporate air
> when I'm adding the egg mixture to the cream mixture
>
> I will incorporate all of these suggestions into my saved-and
> printed-out recipe as to not forget as I go.
> Nervous Nellie,
> Your first cheesecake at 15; mine as far as I remember: at 70. What a
> pair of cheesecakes! It's gotta be good.
> Thanks so much.


You got it, Kiddo. I'll be anxious to know how you like it. have fun!

--
Wayne Boatwright տլ
__________________________________________________

"One man's meat is another man's poison"
- Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.
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Becca
 
Posts: n/a
Default New York cheesecake vs regular?

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> Well, Dee, you know that there are a *lot* of different typs of cheesecake.


Jimmy G has a good selection of cheesecake recipes.

http://expage.com/page/jimmygscakenewsletter


Jimmy G's archive of cookies, biscotti, muffins, etc. I have found some
great recipes on his website.

http://expage.com/page/oldindexes

Becca
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