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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

The thought of making jam in my breadmaker seemed just too stupid to
be true:- until I tried it.
First I made a batch of apricot jam, and it is terrific. Just chop
the fruit, add sugar then set and forget - no stirring; no sticking to
the bottom of the saucepan; no burning the sugar. Afterward, the
nonstick bread pan was a snap to clean.
Next I made a terrific tomato ketchup from my home grown tomatoes -
just use the jam setting - came out better than Heinz!

The handbook said not to add more than 600 gms of fruit, but I used
more than 1 Kg in each case with no problem at all.

If like me, you thought 'this won't work' then I recommend you try it.
Almost worth having a breadmaker just to make jams and sauces - it is
so easy and foolproof.
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Dee Randall
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine


> wrote in message
...
> The thought of making jam in my breadmaker seemed just too stupid to
> be true:- until I tried it.
> First I made a batch of apricot jam, and it is terrific. Just chop
> the fruit, add sugar then set and forget - no stirring; no sticking to
> the bottom of the saucepan; no burning the sugar. Afterward, the
> nonstick bread pan was a snap to clean.
> Next I made a terrific tomato ketchup from my home grown tomatoes -
> just use the jam setting - came out better than Heinz!
>
> The handbook said not to add more than 600 gms of fruit, but I used
> more than 1 Kg in each case with no problem at all.
>
> If like me, you thought 'this won't work' then I recommend you try it.
> Almost worth having a breadmaker just to make jams and sauces - it is
> so easy and foolproof.


I saw your posting on ...baking ng and answered it there this way:
I hadn't thought about using my breadmaker for jam for sometime. I can't
recall whether it was successful or not when I did, it's been so long ago.
But today I made applesauce on the stove, so I'm wondering if I'd put the
applesauce ingredients into the breadmaker if it would have been more like
applebutter.
Thanks,
Dee Dee


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Bronwyn
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

I had never heard of this! On another surprising cooking idea, last
week I read a recipe for baking a meringue layer in the microwave. The
eggwhites (beaten etc) are spread directly on the microwave platter.
It is then rolled up with a fruit filling to make a jelly roll or what
we call a swiss roll. I am really curious to try it as I always have
a plethora of eggwhites in the freezer. I'll try to get around to
this next week and post recipe/results.

Cheers
Bronnie
Oz

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maxine in ri
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

My new breadmaker has a page about making jam, but doesn't give any
recipes or recommendations. Where do you find recipes for jam and
other sauce making in your Breadmaker?

maxine in ri



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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:
(snippage)
> But today I made applesauce on the stove, so I'm wondering if I'd put the
> applesauce ingredients into the breadmaker if it would have been more like
> applebutter.
> Thanks,
> Dee Dee


My guess is that that would depend on how long you cooked it and nothing
more, Dee Dee. Well, okay, apple butter is spiced -- your applesauce
likely isn't as spiced (if at all).
-Barb
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-11-2006, RIP Connie Drew
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~patches~
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

Melba's Jammin' wrote:

> In article >,
> wrote:
>
>
>>The thought of making jam in my breadmaker seemed just too stupid to
>>be true:- until I tried it.
>>First I made a batch of apricot jam, and it is terrific. Just chop
>>the fruit, add sugar then set and forget - no stirring; no sticking to
>>the bottom of the saucepan; no burning the sugar. Afterward, the
>>nonstick bread pan was a snap to clean.
>>Next I made a terrific tomato ketchup from my home grown tomatoes -
>>just use the jam setting - came out better than Heinz!
>>
>>The handbook said not to add more than 600 gms of fruit, but I used
>>more than 1 Kg in each case with no problem at all.
>>
>>If like me, you thought 'this won't work' then I recommend you try it.
>>Almost worth having a breadmaker just to make jams and sauces - it is
>>so easy and foolproof.

>
>
> I've used my crockpot (a generally worthless appliance IMNSHO) for jam.
> How long does it take in the breadmaker?


Finally, someone other than me who doesn't hold the crockpot in such
high regard. I very rarely use mine. A lot of the new breadmakers come
with a jam setting. My model is an older one with no such setting.
IIRC the dough setting is the shortest setting at 90 min so that would
be too long for jam. I would be curious as to not only how long it
takes but how the final product is in comparison to stove cooked jam.
If it is anything like freezer jam, forget it.
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dee Randall
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine


"Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> (snippage)
>> But today I made applesauce on the stove, so I'm wondering if I'd put the
>> applesauce ingredients into the breadmaker if it would have been more
>> like
>> applebutter.
>> Thanks,
>> Dee Dee

>
> My guess is that that would depend on how long you cooked it and nothing
> more, Dee Dee. Well, okay, apple butter is spiced -- your applesauce
> likely isn't as spiced (if at all).
> -Barb


Thanks, Barb. For some reason, I always spice my apple sauce. I just ate
some for breakfast. All I do is peel some apples, put a little water and
maybe butter, a little organic sugar (tan looking) some nutmeg and cinnamon.
I don't add cloves. At breakfast, we were talking at breakfast that
store-bought applesauce tastes puny in comparison. Probably because there
are NO spices, I don't know.

My old and cheap Oster has a jam setting which I've used for jam, but it's
been a long time. I see that it has one setting for jam, which is 60
minutes. There are 3 recipes in my book; 2 for strawberry jam & one for
orange marmalade. They all require pectin (either powdered or liquid).
Here is one recipe:

Frozen Berry Jam
1 package 10-12 oz. frozen berries (strawberries and raspberries are ideal)
1 pouch (3 oz.) liquid fruit pectin
1-3/4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp. lemon
1 pouch (3 oz. liquid fruit pectin)
1-3/4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

Select basic setting. Allow to mix 5-6 minutes, scraping sides of pan. Press
start/stop to cancel.
Select Bake setting (60 minutes)
Remove & pour jam into containers. Refrigerate to set.

Re applesauce/applebutter: I guess I would have to try the same thing that
I do on top of the stove in the breadmaker to see how 'apple-buttery' it
would become in 60 minutes.
Dee Dee





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Dave Smith
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

~patches~ wrote:

> Finally, someone other than me who doesn't hold the crockpot in such
> high regard. I very rarely use mine.


I got rid of mine long ago. It was a weeding present many years ago and
proved itself pretty useless in my kitchen, though I understand lots of
people like theirs and use them a lot.

> A lot of the new breadmakers come
> with a jam setting. My model is an older one with no such setting.
> IIRC the dough setting is the shortest setting at 90 min so that would
> be too long for jam. I would be curious as to not only how long it
> takes but how the final product is in comparison to stove cooked jam.


> If it is anything like freezer jam, forget it.


I have had some pretty good strawberry freezer jam. I was thinking of making
some this year.




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Default jam recipes for a bread machine

On 12 Jan 2006 06:22:35 -0800, "maxine in ri" >
wrote:

>My new breadmaker has a page about making jam, but doesn't give any
>recipes or recommendations. Where do you find recipes for jam and
>other sauce making in your Breadmaker?
>
>maxine in ri


The jam setting on my machine lasts for 1 hour and 50 mins.
15 mins pre-heat and 95 mins cook cycle.
The results are better than stovetop and it's nothing like freezer
jam.

The book (a Breville Bread Master) has 10 jam recipes with one called
"Create your own jam recipe" which calls for 500 gms (about 1 pound)
of fruit of your choice, 1and 2/3 cups sugar and 2 and half
tablespoons of powdered pectin.
Note: This is an Australian book and 1 metric cup is 250 ml in
quantity - 1 US cup is slightly smaller at 237 ml

For recipes try putting this into Google - you will come up with many.
'jam recipe in a bread machine'

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Scott
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

Just tried the jam setting on mine (I keep the BM to make gluten-free
bread, for my sister and niece). Seems to work nicely. It was a
pectin-less jam, 1:1 crushed fruit and sugar, plus some honey.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

<http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
Scott > wrote:

> Just tried the jam setting on mine (I keep the BM to make gluten-free
> bread, for my sister and niece). Seems to work nicely. It was a
> pectin-less jam, 1:1 crushed fruit and sugar, plus some honey.


Scott, is that your typical ratio of fruit and sugar? I'm used to seeing
..75:1 fruit to sugar. Too much sugar and it may start 'sugaring' after
a while in the fridge. What kind did you make, BTW?
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
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Scott
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
Melba's Jammin' > wrote:

> Scott, is that your typical ratio of fruit and sugar? I'm used to seeing
> .75:1 fruit to sugar. Too much sugar and it may start 'sugaring' after
> a while in the fridge. What kind did you make, BTW?


It's from the ABM's recipe book, not my own idea. I didn't know what
rules applied under the circumstances.

How long is "a while"? It's been in the fridge for five days now, and
it's fine.

It's a raspberry jam (well, ~80% raspberries topped off with
blackberries because I didn't have enough of the former). I left the
seeds in--out of absentminded neglect rather then design--otherwise I'd
planned to use it in a recipe*, so I didn't BWB it.

Hey, using OS X, Barb?


* probably still could have used it, but I was worried about the texture
with all those seeds. It was a simple recipe for company: an angel food
cake (can be either homemade or store bought) partly hollowed out from
the top while still in the pan, leaving enough cake so that it holds its
shape easily. Spread jam (I generally use blackberry) over the inside
surface of the scooped-out area, then fill with mixed berries (I used
blackberries, blueberries, and cut up strawberries). Pop the cake out
onto a plate, and fill the center with a combination of chunks of the
scooped-out cake that were mixed with more of the jam.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

<http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
Scott > wrote:

> In article >,
> Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
>
> > Scott, is that your typical ratio of fruit and sugar? I'm used to seeing
> > .75:1 fruit to sugar. Too much sugar and it may start 'sugaring' after
> > a while in the fridge. What kind did you make, BTW?


AND THAT RATIO IS WRONG! DANGIT. I LOOKED AT IT TWICE BEFORE I POSTED
IT, TOO. THAT SHOULD BE 3/4 cup SUGAR to 1 cup FRUIT. Cooked until
thickened.
>
> It's from the ABM's recipe book, not my own idea. I didn't know what
> rules applied under the circumstances.
>
> How long is "a while"? It's been in the fridge for five days now, and
> it's fine.


Excellent. I don't know. Could be a while. Some help I am, huh?
Bonnie Madre sent me some awesome tangerine marmalade made with xylitol
-- I don't have that recipe of hers, I think -- but, honest to Alex, the
stuff started to sugar in about 3 days in the fridge. You might watch
it, though.

>
> It's a raspberry jam (well, ~80% raspberries topped off with
> blackberries because I didn't have enough of the former). I left the
> seeds in--out of absentminded neglect rather then design--otherwise I'd
> planned to use it in a recipe*, so I didn't BWB it.
>
> Hey, using OS X, Barb?


I yam, Sir! The three most important pieces of software I use don't
work right. MC won't print the ingredients list -- just the rest of the
recipe. JAYzuzz! MacLabelPro won't print. CalendarMaker prints
funky. "All your old software should work just fine in Classic, Barb."
Rotten liars! Dirty rotten liars.

(snip)
> Pop the cake out onto a plate,


LOL!! I've NEVER "popped" an angel food cake out of its pan! Pulled
and whacked it, but never "popped it out of the pan." :-)
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
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The Bubbo
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article >,
> Scott > wrote:
>
>> In article >,
>> Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
>>
>> > Scott, is that your typical ratio of fruit and sugar? I'm used to seeing
>> > .75:1 fruit to sugar. Too much sugar and it may start 'sugaring' after
>> > a while in the fridge. What kind did you make, BTW?

>
> AND THAT RATIO IS WRONG! DANGIT. I LOOKED AT IT TWICE BEFORE I POSTED
> IT, TOO. THAT SHOULD BE 3/4 cup SUGAR to 1 cup FRUIT. Cooked until
> thickened.


http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/bread-maker/...dmaker/416767/
question!
What is preserving sugar? Is this something I should be concerned about? Will
regular sugar work?
Will liquor change the consistency like it does in ice cream?
Is acid and issue?
what about pectin?

Thanks! I'll buy you coffee!

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> > In article >,
> > Scott > wrote:
> >
> >> In article >,
> >> Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
> >>
> >> > Scott, is that your typical ratio of fruit and sugar? I'm used to seeing
> >> > .75:1 fruit to sugar. Too much sugar and it may start 'sugaring' after
> >> > a while in the fridge. What kind did you make, BTW?

> >
> > AND THAT RATIO IS WRONG! DANGIT. I LOOKED AT IT TWICE BEFORE I POSTED
> > IT, TOO. THAT SHOULD BE 3/4 cup SUGAR to 1 cup FRUIT. Cooked until
> > thickened.

>
> http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/bread-maker/...dmaker/416767/
> question! What is preserving sugar? Is this something I should be
> concerned about? Will regular sugar work? Will liquor change the
> consistency like it does in ice cream? Is acid and issue? what about
> pectin?


> Thanks! I'll buy you coffee!


It's not something you should worry about, Toots. Preserving sugar
already has the dry pectin mixed in. Kerr used to make a product called
Jel 'n' Jam - same thing. Additional liquid can make for a softer set
so I usually drain some juice from the prepared fruit before cooking it
to jam - and I stir in the booze at the end. Acid level is still fine
for boiling water bath processing.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
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The Bubbo
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article >,
> The Bubbo > wrote:
>
>> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>> > In article >,
>> > Scott > wrote:
>> >
>> >> In article >,
>> >> Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
>> >>
>> >> > Scott, is that your typical ratio of fruit and sugar? I'm used to

seeing
>> >> > .75:1 fruit to sugar. Too much sugar and it may start 'sugaring'

after
>> >> > a while in the fridge. What kind did you make, BTW?
>> >
>> > AND THAT RATIO IS WRONG! DANGIT. I LOOKED AT IT TWICE BEFORE I POSTED
>> > IT, TOO. THAT SHOULD BE 3/4 cup SUGAR to 1 cup FRUIT. Cooked until
>> > thickened.

>>
>>

http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/bread-maker/...dmaker/416767/
>> question! What is preserving sugar? Is this something I should be
>> concerned about? Will regular sugar work? Will liquor change the
>> consistency like it does in ice cream? Is acid and issue? what about
>> pectin?

>
>> Thanks! I'll buy you coffee!

>
> It's not something you should worry about, Toots. Preserving sugar
> already has the dry pectin mixed in. Kerr used to make a product called
> Jel 'n' Jam - same thing. Additional liquid can make for a softer set
> so I usually drain some juice from the prepared fruit before cooking it
> to jam - and I stir in the booze at the end. Acid level is still fine
> for boiling water bath processing.


Thanks.
Pretty much I just want to start experimenting with making new combinations
and flavors of jams but I don't want to preserve them or anything, just make
them and eat them.

The minute I start to think about preserving something I know everyone within
12 miles of me will get botulism and die...before I even preserve anything!

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:
(snippage)
>
> Thanks.
> Pretty much I just want to start experimenting with making new combinations
> and flavors of jams but I don't want to preserve them or anything, just make
> them and eat them.
>
> The minute I start to think about preserving something I know everyone within
> 12 miles of me will get botulism and die...before I even preserve anything!


We'll talk - are we going to Penzeys THIS weekend? Saturday.

You won't kill anyone with jam or jelly. Believe it. The U of GA is
coming out with a new edition of their "So Easy to Preserve" book this
spring. That's a good one, as is the better-known Ball Blue Book (Fleet
Farm/ WalMart/KMart, in the spring, or from homecanning.com). You need
some basic understanding and we can do that. I've got lots of
resources, too. :-)
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
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The Bubbo
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article >,
> The Bubbo > wrote:
> (snippage)
>>
>> Thanks.
>> Pretty much I just want to start experimenting with making new combinations
>> and flavors of jams but I don't want to preserve them or anything, just

make
>> them and eat them.
>>
>> The minute I start to think about preserving something I know everyone

within
>> 12 miles of me will get botulism and die...before I even preserve anything!

>
> We'll talk - are we going to Penzeys THIS weekend? Saturday.
>
> You won't kill anyone with jam or jelly. Believe it. The U of GA is
> coming out with a new edition of their "So Easy to Preserve" book this
> spring. That's a good one, as is the better-known Ball Blue Book (Fleet
> Farm/ WalMart/KMart, in the spring, or from homecanning.com). You need
> some basic understanding and we can do that. I've got lots of
> resources, too. :-)


I think saturday will work. We were talking about doing a sushi party at my
place but I've go so much going on right now that I don't think I can whip the
house into presentation state this week. So, going to coffee/penzey's sounds
like a better plan.

My grandfather's 80th birthday is next month and I've been tasked with doing
the food, I'd like to make an interesting jam to serve on the cheese plate.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:
(snippage)

> > We'll talk - are we going to Penzeys THIS weekend? Saturday.


> > You won't kill anyone with jam or jelly. Believe it. The U of GA is
> > coming out with a new edition of their "So Easy to Preserve" book this
> > spring. That's a good one, as is the better-known Ball Blue Book (Fleet
> > Farm/ WalMart/KMart, in the spring, or from homecanning.com). You need
> > some basic understanding and we can do that. I've got lots of
> > resources, too. :-)


> I think saturday will work. We were talking about doing a sushi party at my
> place but I've go so much going on right now that I don't think I can whip the
> house into presentation state this week. So, going to coffee/penzey's sounds
> like a better plan.
>
> My grandfather's 80th birthday is next month and I've been tasked with doing
> the food, I'd like to make an interesting jam to serve on the cheese plate.


We can talk about that. I've got recipes. And we're going to have to
hit Penzeys and do coffee before noon - I just learned about another
funeral I have to go to on Saturday afternoon. Honest to Alex!! MOF,
I'll send the obit to you at work -- the lovely man went to school at
what's now the name of the place where you work.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
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maxine in ri
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine


Melba's Jammin' wrote:

> > My grandfather's 80th birthday is next month and I've been tasked with doing
> > the food, I'd like to make an interesting jam to serve on the cheese plate.

>
> I just learned about another
> funeral I have to go to on Saturday afternoon. Honest to Alex!! MOF,
> I'll send the obit to you at work -- the lovely man went to school at
> what's now the name of the place where you work.


Every day I check the obituaries in three papers that cover most of my
friends and family. If I don't see any names I know, it's a good day.


All I can say Barb, is you'd better be taking good care of yourself. I
doubt there are enough hotel rooms in your area to accommodate all of
us!

maxine in ri

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Rhonda Anderson
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine

"maxine in ri" > wrote in
ups.com:


>
> All I can say Barb, is you'd better be taking good care of yourself.
> I doubt there are enough hotel rooms in your area to accommodate all
> of us!
>


She can't go till I have enough money in the bank to pay for airfares to
the funeral - and at the rate we're going, that'll be quite a few years yet
<g>.

Rhonda Anderson
Cranebrook, NSW, Australia


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Making jam in a bread machine - recipe included

In article >,
wrote:
(snippage)
>
> What has this got to do with making jam in a bread machine?
> I think you have newsgroups confused with chat rooms.
>
> Don't post completely irreverent messages to a newsgroup - use a chat
> room instead, then we all won't have to read your personal messages.
>
> The idea of a newsgroup, is to post messages that EVERYONE is
> interested in.


You're right, although sometimes the irreverent messages do brighten up
the day.

And the irrelevant messages (like this one) shouldn't be here but
sometimes show up because the thread drifts.

Here are a couple recipes -- for bread and jam -- but not in an electric
bread machine. "-) I hope you'll be interested in them. What's kind
of cool is that in 2000 I had the best of the jams at the Fair -- and
the blue ribbon for white bread to spread it on. How can you beat that?
:-)

{ Magically Exported from MasterCook Mac }

Barb Schaller's Mango-Strawberry Jam with Kiwifruit
(This is in the rec.food.cooking cookbook)

Recipe By: posted yet again to rec.food.cooking by Barb Schaller,
1-21-2006
Serving Size: 10 jars (half pint size)

2 cups diced mango (1#)
1 3/4 cups mashed strawberries
3/4 cup diced kiwifruit
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 tsp citric acid
7 1/2 cups sugar
2 pouches Certo brand liquid fruit pectin

Follow Certo instructions for cooked Strawberry Jam using these measures
of fruit and sugar, adding the acids with the fruit and sugar. Process
in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

----------
Notes: Source: Made it up for 1996 State Fair. Best stuff I made all
summer; it didn't win a thing at the Fair. Humbug! But it did win
First Place in 1997!! But not in 1998.

{ Effortlessly Exported from MasterCook Mac }

Sweepstakes White Bread (Half recipe - 2 large loaves)

Recipe By: posted again to rec.food.cooking by Barb Schaller, 1-21-2006
Serving Size: 24
Preparation Time: 4:30

1 package active dry yeast (2-1/2 teaspoons) (1/4 oz.)
1/4 cup warm water (110F/45C)
1/2 tsp sugar
1 cup milk scalded
3 tablespoons shortening scant
3 tablespoons sugar scant
1 tablespoon salt
3/4 cup cold water
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (2 1/2 to 2 3/4 cup)
2 1/2 cups bread flour (2 1/2 to 2 3/4 cup)
Butter

In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water with 1/2 teaspoon sugar.
In a large bowl, combine scalded milk, sugar, shortening, and salt. Add
cold water to cool mixture to lukewarm. Stir in dissolved yeast, 2 cups
all purpose flour and 2 cups bread flour. Beat well until smooth. By
hand, stir in enough additional flour to make a stiff dough. Turn out
dough onto a floured surface, Knead minimum of 10 minutes or until
dough is smooth and elastic. Wash and grease a large bowl. Place dough
in bowl. Cover with plastic film; let rise in a warm place 60-75
minutes or until doubled in size. Punch down dough. Cover, let rise 30
minutes. Punch down dough. Divide dough in 2 pieces; shape in oblongs.
Cover with an inverted bowl and let rest 15 minutes. Grease 2
(8-1/2"x4-1/2") loaf pans. Shape dough pieces in loaves. Place in
greased pans and lightly grease tops of loaves. Cover and let rise
until loaves are light and almost as high as you want them when baked,
about 45 to 60 minutes. Preheat oven to 400F (205C). Bake in preheated
oven 45 minutes or until loaves sound hollow when lightly tapped.
Remove from pans. Immediately butter tops of warm loaves. Makes 2
loaves.

----------
Notes: Source: Second place winner in 1990, 1993, 1995, and 1997
Minnesota State Fairs. First Place in 2000 Fair!! Woo-hoo! I do it
all in the Kitchen-Aid mixer. I think I bake it for about 30 minutes at
375.

Source: Page 82, Americas Best State Fair Recipes, Catherine Hanley,
HP Books, 1987. This is Elaine Janas' recipe. Elaine is the perennial
baking queen at the Fair.

_____
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
maxine in ri
 
Posts: n/a
Default Making jam in a bread machine

On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 16:57:35 +1030, connected the dots
and wrote:

~On 19 Jan 2006 06:33:02 -0800, "maxine in ri" >
~wrote:
~
~>
~>Melba's Jammin' wrote:
~>
~
~>> I just learned about another
~>> funeral I have to go to on Saturday afternoon. Honest to Alex!!
MOF,
~>> I'll send the obit to you at work -- the lovely man went to school
at
~>> what's now the name of the place where you work.
~>
~>Every day I check the obituaries in three papers that cover most of
my
~>friends and family. If I don't see any names I know, it's a good
day.
~>
~>
~>All I can say Barb, is you'd better be taking good care of yourself.
I
~>doubt there are enough hotel rooms in your area to accommodate all
of
~>us!
~>
~>maxine in ri
~
~What has this got to do with making jam in a bread machine?
~I think you have newsgroups confused with chat rooms.
~
~Don't post completely irreverent messages to a newsgroup - use a chat
~room instead, then we all won't have to read your personal messages.
~
~The idea of a newsgroup, is to post messages that EVERYONE is
~interested in.

You must be new to this forum. Barb has been sharing advice with
anyone who asks for eons, and when she's down we will empathize,
sympathize, and try to cheer her up a bit.

And if you are concerned about posting relevant messages to this
newsgroup, perhaps you should reconsider the one you sent just sent to
which I am responding.

OB Food: I love fish. We lost power this evening for about an hour,
and when it came back on, dinner was on the table in 20 minutes.

maxine in ri
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default Making jam in a bread machine


> wrote

> The idea of a newsgroup, is to post messages that EVERYONE is
> interested in.


Sounds as if you should high thee to rec.food.recipes.
Enjoy.

nancy


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