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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
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mikehende
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.

Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
Thanks.

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Doug Kanter
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"mikehende" > wrote in message
lkaboutcooking.com...
> Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
> problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
> even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>
> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
> to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
> Thanks.
>


Put a floor fan by the big garage door, blowing outward while you're
cooking. Smoke clings to everything, which is why it's such a major project
to get rid of the smell when there's been a house fire (and some of the
house is still intact).

The other obvious solution is to grill outdoors. If it's cold outside, it's
probably not much warmer in the garage. Why cook in there to begin with,
unless it's raining or snowing?


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Doug Kanter" > wrote

> "mikehende" > wrote


>> Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
>> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
>> problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
>> even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>>
>> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
>> to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
>> Thanks.


> Put a floor fan by the big garage door, blowing outward while you're
> cooking.


> The other obvious solution is to grill outdoors. If it's cold outside,
> it's probably not much warmer in the garage. Why cook in there to begin
> with, unless it's raining or snowing?


I hope Mike is grilling with the door open?

nancy


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Doug Kanter
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Nancy Young" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Doug Kanter" > wrote
>
>> "mikehende" > wrote

>
>>> Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
>>> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
>>> problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
>>> even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>>>
>>> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't
>>> wish
>>> to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
>>> Thanks.

>
>> Put a floor fan by the big garage door, blowing outward while you're
>> cooking.

>
>> The other obvious solution is to grill outdoors. If it's cold outside,
>> it's probably not much warmer in the garage. Why cook in there to begin
>> with, unless it's raining or snowing?

>
> I hope Mike is grilling with the door open?
>
> nancy
>


Good question. :-) If he never comes back to the discussion, we may have
the answer.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Mr Libido Incognito
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

Nancy Young wrote:
> "Doug Kanter" > wrote
>
>> "mikehende" > wrote

>
>>> Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
>>> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
>>> problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
>>> even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>>>
>>> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
>>> to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
>>> Thanks.

>
>> Put a floor fan by the big garage door, blowing outward while you're
>> cooking.

>
>> The other obvious solution is to grill outdoors. If it's cold outside,
>> it's probably not much warmer in the garage. Why cook in there to begin
>> with, unless it's raining or snowing?

>
> I hope Mike is grilling with the door open?
>
> nancy
>
>

Every Year People die from carbon Monoxide poisioning from grilling in
enclosed spaces... Don't be a dead whimp...Grill outside.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
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mikehende
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

I am Sooooo sorry everyone for the misunderstanding here, I had thought
that by saying this in my original post:

"Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back"

that would have explained it all, it's my fault. The other info I should
have given was that I am using a Propane Stove in the Garage and doing
regular cooking that you would do on your stove in your kitchen. The added
heat from the cooking also is a big help in keeping the Garage warm even
though I am using at the same time, a Garage Shop Heater.

So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
options do I have to get rid of the smell?

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article
outcooking.com>,
"mikehende" > wrote:

> Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
> problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
> even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>
> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
> to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
> Thanks.
>


Incense.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
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sarah bennett
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article
> outcooking.com>,
> "mikehende" > wrote:
>
>
>>Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
>>cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
>>problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
>>even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>>
>> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
>>to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
>>Thanks.
>>

>
>
> Incense.


you need to keep the garage door open, anyhow, so you dont die.

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Doug Kanter
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"mikehende" > wrote in message
lkaboutcooking.com...
>I am Sooooo sorry everyone for the misunderstanding here, I had thought
> that by saying this in my original post:
>
> "Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back"
>
> that would have explained it all, it's my fault. The other info I should
> have given was that I am using a Propane Stove in the Garage and doing
> regular cooking that you would do on your stove in your kitchen. The added
> heat from the cooking also is a big help in keeping the Garage warm even
> though I am using at the same time, a Garage Shop Heater.
>
> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>


Hang fresh evergreen branches all over the garage.

Why are you doing this kind of cooking in the garage instead of in the
house?


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bobemeril
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

That propane in the garage is no safer than any other fuel.The carbon
monoxide will sneak up on you.A friend of mine in a similar situation
thought it was odd that his cigarette kept going out.Not till his wife
mentioned that the dog was acting strange did he realize the lack of
oxygen in his garage!!! If you continue to do this,at least get a
carbon monoxide detector for your garage[good idea to have one in the
house too]
mikehende wrote:
> I am Sooooo sorry everyone for the misunderstanding here, I had thought
> that by saying this in my original post:
>
> "Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back"
>
> that would have explained it all, it's my fault. The other info I should
> have given was that I am using a Propane Stove in the Garage and doing
> regular cooking that you would do on your stove in your kitchen. The added
> heat from the cooking also is a big help in keeping the Garage warm even
> though I am using at the same time, a Garage Shop Heater.
>
> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> options do I have to get rid of the smell?




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Mr Libido Incognito" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:


>> I hope Mike is grilling with the door open?


> Every Year People die from carbon Monoxide poisioning from grilling in
> enclosed spaces... Don't be a dead whimp...Grill outside.


Just what I was thinking ... he said he put the grill aside, then
he's cooking in the garage? Is he using the grill?

Definitely want to think twice about using that in the house.

nancy


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Sheldon
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article
> outcooking.com>,
> "mikehende" > wrote:
>
> > Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
> > cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
> > problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
> > even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
> >
> > Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
> > to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
> > Thanks.
> >

>
> Incense.


Yeah... light an italian. Wait, he's cooking in the garage, he is an
italian!

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Sheldon
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


bobemeril wrote:
> That propane in the garage is no safer than any other fuel.The carbon
> monoxide will sneak up on you.


Cooking with propane indoors is perfectly safe, there is very little
carbon monoxide produced... millions of homes use propane stoves,
millions of propane forklifts are operated indoors... you'd best never
enter Home Depot, Lowes, etal.

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Dee Randall
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

>
> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> options do I have to get rid of the smell?


I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
(and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon filter
for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into the
room.

Is there any disagreement on this?
Dee Dee





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Doug Kanter
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
> >
>> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
>> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>> options do I have to get rid of the smell?

>
> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
> filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
> into the room.
>
> Is there any disagreement on this?
> Dee Dee


As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone was
either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more permanent
sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends steam away
from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to replace than
the fan blades.




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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article
outcooking.com>,
"mikehende" > wrote:

> Now that it's winter I have put aside the Grill and intend on doing some
> cooking inside my Garage until the spring when I will switch back. The
> problem I am having is the food smell that seems to stay in the Garage,
> even with a little "airing" out of the place I still get the smell.
>
> Is there anything I can do to get rid of the smell quickly? I don't wish
> to simply "cover up" the smell, I want to get rid of it, any ideas?
> Thanks.


Open doors and a fan to circulate the air. There's also a
locally-manufactured product called Atmos-Klear that's supposed to be
pretty effective for removing odor/aroma/fragrance from stuff.

http://www.atmosklear.net/
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-3-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article .com>,
"bobemeril" > wrote:

> If you continue to do this,at least get a
> carbon monoxide detector for your garage


Excellent advice!!!!!!!!!!!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

> >
> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?

>
> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon filter
> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into the
> room.
>
> Is there any disagreement on this?
> Dee Dee
>
>
>
>
>


Depends...

The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
install a roof vent/chimeney.

I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
charcoal filter.

I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article >,
"Doug Kanter" > wrote:

> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
> > >
> >> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> >> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> >> options do I have to get rid of the smell?

> >
> > I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
> > (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
> > over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
> > filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
> > into the room.
> >
> > Is there any disagreement on this?
> > Dee Dee

>
> As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone was
> either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
> fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
> ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more permanent
> sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends steam away
> from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to replace than
> the fan blades.
>
>


And it messes up the ceiling...

I just happen to have a cabinet above the stove so it has to be cleaned
regularly.

Yeah, it's a PITA.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Sheldon
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>
> Every Year People die from carbon Monoxide poisioning from grilling in
> enclosed spaces... Don't be a dead whimp...Grill outside.


You're thinking *charcoal*.... propane produces no significant carbon
monoxide. The only real safety issue with using an outdoor propane
grill indoors is heat build up, outdoor propane grills need to be more
than ten feet from combustibles and with no combustibles above. And of
course grilling creates lots of cooking smoke/fumes and it's not
practical to vent an outdoor grill indoors.



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Dee Randall
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Doug Kanter" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
>> >
>>> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
>>> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>>> options do I have to get rid of the smell?

>>
>> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
>> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
>> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>> filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
>> into the room.
>>
>> Is there any disagreement on this?
>> Dee Dee

>
> As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone
> was either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
> fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
> ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more
> permanent sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends
> steam away from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to
> replace than the fan blades.



Are you talking about a ceiling fan or a vent fan over a stove?
Are you saying that steam turns into dry dust in over-head kitchen VENT/FAN
element? That is what I want to know, not whether steam causes dust on a
ceiling fan.
Is one to deduce that because steam causes dust on a ceiling fan that the
accelerated steam coming off a stove will rapidly turn to dust as it 'hits
the fan'?
Thanks for your response.
Dee Dee






>



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Dee Randall
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Doug Kanter" > wrote:
>
>> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > >
>> >> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
>> >> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>> >> options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>> >
>> > I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not
>> > all
>> > (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could
>> > use
>> > over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>> > filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
>> > into the room.
>> >
>> > Is there any disagreement on this?
>> > Dee Dee

>>
>> As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone
>> was
>> either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
>> fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
>> ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more
>> permanent
>> sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends steam
>> away
>> from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to replace than
>> the fan blades.
>>
>>

>
> And it messes up the ceiling...
>
> I just happen to have a cabinet above the stove so it has to be cleaned
> regularly.
>


Yes, but -- er -- Does the steam that goes up into your fan area while
cooking always vent back into the room? That is what I was told.
Thanks,
Dee Dee


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Dee Randall
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
>> >
>> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
>> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?

>>
>> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
>> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
>> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>> filter
>> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into the
>> room.
>>
>> Is there any disagreement on this?
>> Dee Dee
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>

>
> Depends...
>
> The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
> metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
> install a roof vent/chimeney.
>
> I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
> charcoal filter.
>
> I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
> --
> Om.


Thanks, Om, for your answer. That IS what she was saying, that if you did
not have a roof vent, the steam vented back into the room. But, I'm
thinking that, as I do have cabinets overhead, is the steam going to come
back out into your face? Onto your clothing? I have some pretty heavy-duty
steam coming out of my pots at times. For the worse steaming, I take
outside. My Genn-Air is a down draft now and it is insufficient to do the
job of heavy steaming.

We would have to intall a roof vent thru the attic and that's a ways up.
The Genn-Air down draft is looking more and more attractive. Yuk!
Thanks.
Dee Dee


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Nancy Young
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Dee Randall" > wrote

> Yes, but -- er -- Does the steam that goes up into your fan area while
> cooking always vent back into the room? That is what I was told.


If it's vented to the outside, I don't know why it would. If it's
just a fan that recirculates into the room as mine does, then yes.

Mine is an over-stove microwave that doubles as a vent, you
could vent it either way. Wasn't convenient to vent it to the
outside so I'm stuck with it that way.

nancy


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Doug Kanter
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Doug Kanter" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> >
>>>> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
>>>> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>>>> options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>>
>>> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
>>> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
>>> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>>> filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
>>> into the room.
>>>
>>> Is there any disagreement on this?
>>> Dee Dee

>>
>> As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone
>> was either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
>> fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
>> ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more
>> permanent sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends
>> steam away from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to
>> replace than the fan blades.

>
>
> Are you talking about a ceiling fan or a vent fan over a stove?
> Are you saying that steam turns into dry dust in over-head kitchen
> VENT/FAN element? That is what I want to know, not whether steam causes
> dust on a ceiling fan.
> Is one to deduce that because steam causes dust on a ceiling fan that the
> accelerated steam coming off a stove will rapidly turn to dust as it 'hits
> the fan'?
> Thanks for your response.
> Dee Dee


I beginning to wonder if you're joking. But, for the moment, let's assume
you're not. I'm talking about two fans: The one over your stove, and the
fact that its steam will have an effect on the dust that normally settles on
your ceiling fan, if you have one.

Steam is steam. Dust is dust. One cannot become the other, but they can
interact. Your ceiling fan blades will get dusty. Add steam, and now you
have gummy dust that's harder to clean. The steam did not cause the dust -
it simply changed its consistency, like adding water to a bowl of flour.




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Doug Kanter
 
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Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
>
> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
>> In article >,
>> "Doug Kanter" > wrote:
>>
>>> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > >
>>> >> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my
>>> >> kitchen
>>> >> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>>> >> options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>> >
>>> > I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not
>>> > all
>>> > (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could
>>> > use
>>> > over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>>> > filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except
>>> > back
>>> > into the room.
>>> >
>>> > Is there any disagreement on this?
>>> > Dee Dee
>>>
>>> As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone
>>> was
>>> either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
>>> fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
>>> ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more
>>> permanent
>>> sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends steam
>>> away
>>> from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to replace
>>> than
>>> the fan blades.
>>>
>>>

>>
>> And it messes up the ceiling...
>>
>> I just happen to have a cabinet above the stove so it has to be cleaned
>> regularly.
>>

>
> Yes, but -- er -- Does the steam that goes up into your fan area while
> cooking always vent back into the room? That is what I was told.
> Thanks,
> Dee Dee
>


Yes, unless you have a duct to the outside. Do you?


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
> >
> > Every Year People die from carbon Monoxide poisioning from grilling in
> > enclosed spaces... Don't be a dead whimp...Grill outside.

>
> You're thinking *charcoal*.... propane produces no significant carbon
> monoxide.


Maybe, maybe not.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...ane+stoves+and
+carbon+monoxide

Seriously, it does not pay to screw around.
It really does not.

A CO detector is a small investment for safety.
Especially when you are dealing with lives.

CO (Carbon monoxide) has a higher affinity for blood hemoglobin than
oxygen does.
Once the molecule attaches, it does not let go.

I'm not joking. It's basic physiology.

Hemoglobin/Red Blood cells have a 3 month lifespan in the bloodstream.

> The only real safety issue with using an outdoor propane
> grill indoors is heat build up, outdoor propane grills need to be more
> than ten feet from combustibles and with no combustibles above.


Sorry luv, but you are dead wrong on this point.
Literally.

Outdoor grills are not designed to operate in indoor conditions.

> And of
> course grilling creates lots of cooking smoke/fumes and it's not
> practical to vent an outdoor grill indoors.
>


Just open the damned garage door.

And wear warm clothing.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Doug Kanter
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
>
> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
>> In article >,
>> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>>
>>> >
>>> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
>>> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>>> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>>
>>> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
>>> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
>>> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>>> filter
>>> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into
>>> the
>>> room.
>>>
>>> Is there any disagreement on this?
>>> Dee Dee
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> Depends...
>>
>> The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
>> metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
>> install a roof vent/chimeney.
>>
>> I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
>> charcoal filter.
>>
>> I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
>> --
>> Om.

>
> Thanks, Om, for your answer. That IS what she was saying, that if you did
> not have a roof vent, the steam vented back into the room. But, I'm
> thinking that, as I do have cabinets overhead, is the steam going to come
> back out into your face? Onto your clothing? I have some pretty
> heavy-duty steam coming out of my pots at times. For the worse steaming,
> I take outside. My Genn-Air is a down draft now and it is insufficient to
> do the job of heavy steaming.
>
> We would have to intall a roof vent thru the attic and that's a ways up.
> The Genn-Air down draft is looking more and more attractive. Yuk!
> Thanks.
> Dee Dee
>


Just to be su Your stove is NOT on an outside wall?


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?

Doug Kanter wrote:
> "mikehende" > wrote in message
> lkaboutcooking.com...
>> that would have explained it all, it's my fault. The other info I
>> should have given was that I am using a Propane Stove in the Garage
>> and doing regular cooking that you would do on your stove in your
>> kitchen. The added heat from the cooking also is a big help in
>> keeping the Garage warm even though I am using at the same time, a
>> Garage Shop Heater.
>>
>> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my
>> kitchen has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot,
>> what other options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>

>
> Why are you doing this kind of cooking in the garage instead of in the
> house?


Excellent question, Doug. Doesn't make sense to me; might as well just
bundle up and grill outdoors.

Jill


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> "bobemeril" wrote:
>
> > If you continue to do this,at least get a
> > carbon monoxide detector for your garage

>
> Excellent advice!!!!!!!!!!!


That's actually no advice at all... darn thing would go off every time
the car was moved... but would do nothing from using a propane stove.
Placing a carbon monoxide detector in a garage is like putting a
methane detector inside your out house. hehe



  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Doug Kanter" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> In article >,
>>> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>>>
>>>> >
>>>> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my
>>>> > kitchen
>>>> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
>>>> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>>>
>>>> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not
>>>> all
>>>> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could
>>>> use
>>>> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>>>> filter
>>>> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into
>>>> the
>>>> room.
>>>>
>>>> Is there any disagreement on this?
>>>> Dee Dee
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> Depends...
>>>
>>> The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
>>> metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
>>> install a roof vent/chimeney.
>>>
>>> I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
>>> charcoal filter.
>>>
>>> I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
>>> --
>>> Om.

>>
>> Thanks, Om, for your answer. That IS what she was saying, that if you
>> did not have a roof vent, the steam vented back into the room. But, I'm
>> thinking that, as I do have cabinets overhead, is the steam going to come
>> back out into your face? Onto your clothing? I have some pretty
>> heavy-duty steam coming out of my pots at times. For the worse steaming,
>> I take outside. My Genn-Air is a down draft now and it is insufficient to
>> do the job of heavy steaming.
>>
>> We would have to intall a roof vent thru the attic and that's a ways up.
>> The Genn-Air down draft is looking more and more attractive. Yuk!
>> Thanks.
>> Dee Dee
>>

>
> Just to be su Your stove is NOT on an outside wall?


Yes, our present Jenn-Air is definitely on the outside wall. And vented to
the outside now. But heavy duty pots are too high to catch the steam into
the down-draft.
DH doesn't want to go thru cabinets and tall attic to vent steam out (for
various reasons). Even now, he opens the windows when we cook to equalize
the air coming & going.
Dee Dee
>



  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Doug Kanter
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


"jmcquown" > wrote in message
news
> Doug Kanter wrote:
>> "mikehende" > wrote in message
>> lkaboutcooking.com...
>>> that would have explained it all, it's my fault. The other info I
>>> should have given was that I am using a Propane Stove in the Garage
>>> and doing regular cooking that you would do on your stove in your
>>> kitchen. The added heat from the cooking also is a big help in
>>> keeping the Garage warm even though I am using at the same time, a
>>> Garage Shop Heater.
>>>
>>> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my
>>> kitchen has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot,
>>> what other options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>>

>>
>> Why are you doing this kind of cooking in the garage instead of in the
>> house?

>
> Excellent question, Doug. Doesn't make sense to me; might as well just
> bundle up and grill outdoors.
>
> Jill
>
>

Don't start with me, Jill. I know your motives.

:-)


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Doug Kanter
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Doug Kanter" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> In article >,
>>>> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> >
>>>>> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my
>>>>> > kitchen
>>>>> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what
>>>>> > other
>>>>> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?
>>>>>
>>>>> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not
>>>>> all
>>>>> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could
>>>>> use
>>>>> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
>>>>> filter
>>>>> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into
>>>>> the
>>>>> room.
>>>>>
>>>>> Is there any disagreement on this?
>>>>> Dee Dee
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Depends...
>>>>
>>>> The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
>>>> metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
>>>> install a roof vent/chimeney.
>>>>
>>>> I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
>>>> charcoal filter.
>>>>
>>>> I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
>>>> --
>>>> Om.
>>>
>>> Thanks, Om, for your answer. That IS what she was saying, that if you
>>> did not have a roof vent, the steam vented back into the room. But, I'm
>>> thinking that, as I do have cabinets overhead, is the steam going to
>>> come back out into your face? Onto your clothing? I have some pretty
>>> heavy-duty steam coming out of my pots at times. For the worse
>>> steaming, I take outside. My Genn-Air is a down draft now and it is
>>> insufficient to do the job of heavy steaming.
>>>
>>> We would have to intall a roof vent thru the attic and that's a ways up.
>>> The Genn-Air down draft is looking more and more attractive. Yuk!
>>> Thanks.
>>> Dee Dee
>>>

>>
>> Just to be su Your stove is NOT on an outside wall?

>
> Yes, our present Jenn-Air is definitely on the outside wall. And vented
> to the outside now. But heavy duty pots are too high to catch the steam
> into the down-draft.
> DH doesn't want to go thru cabinets and tall attic to vent steam out (for
> various reasons). Even now, he opens the windows when we cook to equalize
> the air coming & going.
> Dee Dee
>>

>
>


So, find an overhead cooking fan unit that vents straight out through the
wall. End of problem.


  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


Dee Randall wrote:
> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "Doug Kanter" > wrote:
> >
> >> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > >
> >> >> So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> >> >> has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> >> >> options do I have to get rid of the smell?
> >> >
> >> > I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not
> >> > all
> >> > (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could
> >> > use
> >> > over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
> >> > filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
> >> > into the room.
> >> >
> >> > Is there any disagreement on this?
> >> > Dee Dee
> >>
> >> As far as the steam, how could there be any disagreement, unless someone
> >> was
> >> either blind, or stupid? :-) It happens right before your eyes (and
> >> fingers). You can see and feel the steam being redirected toward your
> >> ceiling fan, where it'll cause normally dry dust to become a more
> >> permanent
> >> sludge. The only major advantage to such a fan is that it sends steam
> >> away
> >> from your kitchen cabinets, which are much more expensive to replace than
> >> the fan blades.
> >>
> >>

> >
> > And it messes up the ceiling...
> >
> > I just happen to have a cabinet above the stove so it has to be cleaned
> > regularly.
> >

>
> Yes, but -- er -- Does the steam that goes up into your fan area while
> cooking always vent back into the room? That is what I was told.


It would no longer be steam, in fact it was not steam, what you saw was
water vapor (steam is invisible)... it quickly condensed on the metal
parts of your grease catcher (what you describe is not a ventilator,
that's a filtrator) and then quickly evaporates back into the room
atmosphere... goes from visible vapor to rain to invisible vapor, but
was not steam. Those stove hoods that do not vent to the outdoors are
essentially a waste of money... the best they can do is trap a very
small percentage of grease from cooking fumes, and many contain a lamp
so you can better see what you cook... an awfully expensive lamp.

  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


My original post posed this question:
I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not
all (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could
use over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
filter for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back
into
the room. Is there any disagreement on this?

and that is the question that one of the other posters answered concisely:

>>>>> The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
>>>>> metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
>>>>> install a roof vent/chimeney.
>>>>>
>>>>> I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
>>>>> charcoal filter.
>>>>>
>>>>> I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.

***

Your last answer:
So, find an overhead cooking fan unit that vents straight out through the
wall. End of problem.

No, not end of problem. Loss of cabinets for venting system, whether to
roof or outside of wall is the same problem; i.e., installation of a vent
"system."
However, this was not what I was addressing, so conversation 'fait
accompli.'
Thanks for any response.
Dee Dee











  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

> > And it messes up the ceiling...
> >
> > I just happen to have a cabinet above the stove so it has to be cleaned
> > regularly.
> >

>
> Yes, but -- er -- Does the steam that goes up into your fan area while
> cooking always vent back into the room? That is what I was told.
> Thanks,
> Dee Dee


Yes, it does.
Thru a fan filter.

It reduces the amount of grease on the ceiling if you use the proper
filter and keep it clean.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Doug Kanter
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?

"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...

>
> Your last answer:
> So, find an overhead cooking fan unit that vents straight out through the
> wall. End of problem.
>
> No, not end of problem. Loss of cabinets for venting system, whether to
> roof or outside of wall is the same problem; i.e., installation of a
> vent "system."
> However, this was not what I was addressing, so conversation 'fait
> accompli.'
> Thanks for any response.
> Dee Dee


Loss of cabinets? Why? Are they mounted unusually low over your stove,
meaning not enough clearance to add a fan thing?


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?

In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

>
> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> >
> >> >
> >> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> >> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> >> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?
> >>
> >> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
> >> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
> >> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
> >> filter
> >> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into the
> >> room.
> >>
> >> Is there any disagreement on this?
> >> Dee Dee
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>

> >
> > Depends...
> >
> > The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
> > metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
> > install a roof vent/chimeney.
> >
> > I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
> > charcoal filter.
> >
> > I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
> > --
> > Om.

>
> Thanks, Om, for your answer. That IS what she was saying, that if you did
> not have a roof vent, the steam vented back into the room. But, I'm
> thinking that, as I do have cabinets overhead, is the steam going to come
> back out into your face? Onto your clothing? I have some pretty heavy-duty
> steam coming out of my pots at times. For the worse steaming, I take
> outside. My Genn-Air is a down draft now and it is insufficient to do the
> job of heavy steaming.
>
> We would have to intall a roof vent thru the attic and that's a ways up.
> The Genn-Air down draft is looking more and more attractive. Yuk!
> Thanks.
> Dee Dee


As long as the upper part of the vent runs back into the room, you are
getting limited ventilation.

Ideally, any stove should vent to the outside but this is the exception
rather than the rule.

Unless you fix it. ;-)

The deposits coming back thru the vent can settle _anywhere_.

Check the tops of cabinets etc. It's not unusual to end up with a
greasy/dusty deposit on the cabinets above and in my case, on top of the
refrigerator since it's next to the stove.

Most of it ends up on the ceiling stuff above the stove. I have to strip
and re-paint from time to time. I want to eventually install a plastic
or tile lined area above the front of the stove for easier cleaning.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


"Doug Kanter" > wrote in message
...
> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>
>> Your last answer:
>> So, find an overhead cooking fan unit that vents straight out through the
>> wall. End of problem.
>>
>> No, not end of problem. Loss of cabinets for venting system, whether to
>> roof or outside of wall is the same problem; i.e., installation of a
>> vent "system."
>> However, this was not what I was addressing, so conversation 'fait
>> accompli.'
>> Thanks for any response.
>> Dee Dee

>
> Loss of cabinets? Why? Are they mounted unusually low over your stove,
> meaning not enough clearance to add a fan thing?


DH's reply:
DH says without specifically measuring and looking at all the new necessary
fan, duct working, and stove specifications, that a fan plus it's housing,
plus the electrical, plus the duct work and whatever other appurtenances to
allow exhausting up and thru the side of the house must take up some of the
existing cabinet/storage space above the stove and necessitate carpentry
work.

DH said to say that he has been known to make snap judgments and he's not
up to speed on the latest and greatest in this regard, but he doesn't
understand how all of this new equipment will not take up present cabinet
space.

Dee Dee


  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Getting rid of food smell?


OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
> >
> > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > In article >,
> > > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> > >
> > >> >
> > >> > So with the exception of having any type of fan vent like my kitchen
> > >> > has to pull most of the steam from off the top of the pot, what other
> > >> > options do I have to get rid of the smell?
> > >>
> > >> I was told yesterday when looking at kitchen vents that most, if not all
> > >> (and I would assume the salesperson was talking about vents I could use
> > >> over MY existing 30" slide in stove or a stove top) only had a carbon
> > >> filter
> > >> for smells, but NEVER would vent steam anywhere else except back into the
> > >> room.
> > >>
> > >> Is there any disagreement on this?
> > >> Dee Dee
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> > > Depends...
> > >
> > > The stove vent that I bought came with a pop-out tracing in the upper
> > > metal insert specifically designed to vent out the roof if I wanted to
> > > install a roof vent/chimeney.
> > >
> > > I did not do it, yet, so yes it vents back into the kitchen thru a
> > > charcoal filter.
> > >
> > > I will eventually install a roof vent when I can afford it.
> > > --
> > > Om.

> >
> > Thanks, Om, for your answer. That IS what she was saying, that if you did
> > not have a roof vent, the steam vented back into the room. But, I'm
> > thinking that, as I do have cabinets overhead, is the steam going to come
> > back out into your face? Onto your clothing? I have some pretty heavy-duty
> > steam coming out of my pots at times. For the worse steaming, I take
> > outside. My Genn-Air is a down draft now and it is insufficient to do the
> > job of heavy steaming.
> >
> > We would have to intall a roof vent thru the attic and that's a ways up.
> > The Genn-Air down draft is looking more and more attractive. Yuk!
> > Thanks.
> > Dee Dee

>
> As long as the upper part of the vent runs back into the room, you are
> getting limited ventilation.
>
> Ideally, any stove should vent to the outside but this is the exception
> rather than the rule.
>
> Unless you fix it. ;-)
>
> The deposits coming back thru the vent can settle _anywhere_.
>
> Check the tops of cabinets etc. It's not unusual to end up with a
> greasy/dusty deposit on the cabinets above and in my case, on top of the
> refrigerator since it's next to the stove.
>
> Most of it ends up on the ceiling stuff above the stove. I have to strip
> and re-paint from time to time. I want to eventually install a plastic
> or tile lined area above the front of the stove for easier cleaning.


Better to install a thru-the-wall exhaust fan, they're inexpensive and
easy to install... and the only tool you'll need with a trailer is a
can opener. hehehe

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