General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-01-2006, 08:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
jw 1111
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins

Hi, i bought on impulse today two bread tins 9" (23cm) by 4.5" (11.5cm) by
2.25" (6 cm) deep and a 1.5 Kg ( 3 lb) bag of whole meal self raising flour.

Could anyone give a novice some reference to simple bread making
instructions please? Many thanks



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2006, 03:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Joseph Littleshoes
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins

jw 1111 wrote:

Hi, i bought on impulse today two bread tins 9" (23cm) by 4.5"
(11.5cm) by
2.25" (6 cm) deep and a 1.5 Kg ( 3 lb) bag of whole meal self raising
flour.

Could anyone give a novice some reference to simple bread making
instructions please? Many thanks


There are a number of good bread recipes, using various flours and
ingredients, one of the simplest is ordinary French bread.It is possible
to approximate, though not duplicate, the crusty country bread of France
using American flours and home ovens. The classic recipe calls for 4
ingredients only -- yeast, four, salt and water.

To thicken and crispen the crust as the bread bakes some authorities
suggest setting a large shallow baking pan of water directly on the
floor of the oven ---the steam generated is claimed to be critical to
the bread's texture. I do not bother with this.

Pain Ordinaire - plain French bread
-----------------------------------------

1 & 1/2 tbs. active dry yeast

3/4 cup warm water (105 - 115 F)

1/2 tsp. salt

2 & 1/4 cups sifted all purpose flour

Glaze
------

1 egg white beaten with 1 tbs. cold water
-------

Sprinkle the yeast over the water and let stand about 5 minutes, or
until completely dissolved. Stir in the salt, then pour mixture into a
large mixing bowl, with one cup of flour (this mixing and kneading can
be done in a food processor much more quickly and easily) mix well and
add another cup of flour, mix and add the remaining 1/4 cup of flour,
mix well and thoroughly.

Examine the texture of the dough. If it seems soft and sticky (as it
may if you attempt to make the bread in rainy or humid weather), add
another 1/4 cup or so of sifted flour.

Remove dough to a clean, floured bread board or other flat surface upon
which to knead the dough, knead well by hand at least 3 - 5 minutes.
Adding flour to the work surface as needed to prevent the bread from
sticking.

When finished kneading transfer the dough to a greased mixing bowl, turn
dough in bowl so that it is lightly greased all over, cover with a
clean, dry cloth, set in a warm place away from drafts and allow to rise
until double in bulk between 1 & 1/2 - 2 hours.

Punch the dough down, turn onto a lightly floured board and knead
briskly for 2 - 3 minutes until dough feels soft and springy.

Using the palms of your hands, roll the dough back and forth on the
floured surface to form a chunky rope about 14 inches long, 3 inches
wide by 2 inches high (can be placed in ordinary loaf pans). Ease onto
an ungreased baking sheet, cover with a clean, dry towel and allow to
rise until double in bulk -- about 1 hour.

Set a shallow baking pan on the oven floor and pour in water to a depth
of 1 inch. Preheat oven to very hot (450 F); this will take about 10
minutes. Meanwhile, brush the bread well with the egg white glaze. Set
it, on the baking sheet, on the middle rack of the oven and bake
uncovered, for 1/2 hour, or until loaf is richly browned and sounds
hollow when thumped with r fingers.

Remove the bread from the oven and cool to room temperature on a wire
rack before cutting. Actually, this bread, like so many rustic breads,.
tears better than it cuts. Simply tear into chunks and enjoy with a
ripe camembert or brie and dry red wine.
---

There are 'quick' breads made without yeast or a period of 'rising' and
other more elaborate breads with oils, milks, butters, eggs, herbs &
spices, cheeses, fruits, veggies etc. etc. in them. Let us know if you
are interested in any of these more complex breads. A Brioche is very
nice but a real 'pain' to make, however i use a food processor and that
makes it a lot easier.
---
Joseph Littleshoes

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2006, 04:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Ken
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins


jw 1111 wrote:
Hi, i bought on impulse today two bread tins 9" (23cm) by 4.5" (11.5cm) by
2.25" (6 cm) deep and a 1.5 Kg ( 3 lb) bag of whole meal self raising flour.

Could anyone give a novice some reference to simple bread making
instructions please? Many thanks


Everybody,

Sorry if this is posted twice. I posted it, but it's not showing up on
my reader. So I'll post it again and see what happens.

Ken

JW,

Since it seems that you want something simple, and you bought self
rising flour, I'm going to give you the easiest bread recipe I know.
I'm a Yank, so measurements will not be in metric, sorry. And I don't
know what whole meal flour is. If that's what we call whole wheat,
you'll need to get some more stuff. Even if bread is called whole
wheat, it's only partially whole wheat, so you'll need to get some
regular white self rising flour. You can add in some whole wheat for a
heartier texture. I'm not experienced enough with breads to tell you
how to adjust.

Self rising flour is also used for what we call biscuits, which is not
the British biscuit, which is what we call a cookie. Sorry, I don't
know England's word for biscuit. The U.S. and England: Two countries
separated by a common language. (I have no idea where you're from, but
since you're using the word tin and metric measurements, I'm assuming
you're more familiar with British than American English.)

Beer Bread:

3 cups self rising flour (This is just regular white, self rising
flour.)
3 tablespoons sugar
1 can beer at room temp. (In the U.S., a can of beer is twelve fluid
ounces.)

Mix together put dough in a greased loaf pan.

Bake 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

This will make a tasty, hearty bread. (Not too many air holes. It's
been a while, but if I remember correctly, it's about half way to corn
bread consistency.) Not what you'd want for sandwiches, but great
heated with butter, or with a plate of cheese and fruit, or to go with
a green salad, or a bowl of stew or soup.

Hope this helps,

Ken

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2006, 05:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Ken
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins


jw 1111 wrote:
Hi, i bought on impulse today two bread tins 9" (23cm) by 4.5" (11.5cm) by
2.25" (6 cm) deep and a 1.5 Kg ( 3 lb) bag of whole meal self raising flour.

Could anyone give a novice some reference to simple bread making
instructions please? Many thanks


JW,

Since it seems that you want something simple, and you bought self
rising flour, I'm going to give you the easiest bread recipe I know
with that type of flour. I'm a Yank, so measurements will not be in
metric, sorry. And I don't know what whole meal flour is. If that's
what we call whole wheat, you'll need to get some more stuff. Even if
bread is called whole wheat, it's only partially whole wheat, so you'll
need to get some regular white, self rising flour. You can add in some
whole wheat for a heartier texture. I'm not experienced enough with
breads to tell you how to adjust.

Self rising flour is also used for what we call biscuits, which is not
the British biscuit, which is what we call a cookie. Sorry, I don't
know England's word for biscuit. The U.S. and England: Two countries
separated by a common language. (I have no idea where you're from, but
since you're using the word tin and metric measurements, I'm assuming
you're more familiar with British than American English.)

Beer Bread:

3 cups self rising flour (This is just regular white, self rising
flour)
3 tablespoons sugar
1 can beer at room temp. (In the U.S., a can of beer is twelve fluid
ounces.)

Mix together put dough in a greased loaf pan.

Bake 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

This will make a tasty, hearty bread. (Not too many air holes. It's
been a while, but if I remember correctly, it's about half way to corn
bread consistency.) Not what you'd want for sandwiches, but great
heated with butter, or with a plate of cheese and fruit, or to go with
a green salad, or a bowl of stew or soup.

Hope this helps,

Ken

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2006, 07:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Kathy in NZ
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins

On 3 Jan 2006 21:09:49 -0800, "Ken"
wrote:


Self rising flour is also used for what we call biscuits, which is not
the British biscuit, which is what we call a cookie. Sorry, I don't
know England's word for biscuit.
Ken


Your biscuit is called a scone, in England (and NZ, and Oz).

Kathy in NZ




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2006, 08:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Joseph Littleshoes
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins

Ken wrote:

jw 1111 wrote:
Hi, i bought on impulse today two bread tins 9" (23cm) by 4.5"

(11.5cm) by
2.25" (6 cm) deep and a 1.5 Kg ( 3 lb) bag of whole meal self

raising flour.

Could anyone give a novice some reference to simple bread making
instructions please? Many thanks


JW,

Since it seems that you want something simple, and you bought self
rising flour...


So much for my reading skills! i did not even see that "self rising"
aspect of the request.
---
JL

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2006, 02:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Ken
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins


Kathy in NZ wrote:
On 3 Jan 2006 21:09:49 -0800, "Ken"
wrote:


Self rising flour is also used for what we call biscuits, which is not
the British biscuit, which is what we call a cookie. Sorry, I don't
know England's word for biscuit.
Ken


Your biscuit is called a scone, in England (and NZ, and Oz).

Kathy in NZ


Kathy,

Thanks. I was thinking that, but when people here make what they call
scones, it's something different. Similar but different. Our biscuits
are often very light and airy. And it's traditional for them to be
short cylinders about an inch-and-a-half high (4 cm) cut from the dough
with a round cookie cutter. Although home made ones are often little
lumps.

Can you tell me what whole meal flour is?

Thanks again,

Ken

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 04:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Kathy in NZ
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins

On 4 Jan 2006 06:11:11 -0800, "Ken"
wrote:


Can you tell me what whole meal flour is?

Thanks again,

Ken

Whole meal flour is wholemeal (one word) in NZ (and probably other
Commonwealth countries) and is known as whole wheat elsewhere. Just
different names for the same thing.

Kathy in NZ

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 04:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Ken
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins


Kathy in NZ wrote:
On 4 Jan 2006 06:11:11 -0800, "Ken"
wrote:


Can you tell me what whole meal flour is?

Thanks again,

Ken

Whole meal flour is wholemeal (one word) in NZ (and probably other
Commonwealth countries) and is known as whole wheat elsewhere. Just
different names for the same thing.

Kathy in NZ


Kathy,

That's what I thought. I hope the o.p. reads a little of this thread
because if he tries to make bread from 100% wholemeal or whole wheat I
would guess he'll end up with more of a brick than a loaf.

Thanks again, again,

Ken

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 11:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Rhonda Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default impulse buy bread tins

"Ken" wrote in
ups.com:


Kathy in NZ wrote:



Your biscuit is called a scone, in England (and NZ, and Oz).

Kathy in NZ


Kathy,

Thanks. I was thinking that, but when people here make what they call
scones, it's something different. Similar but different. Our biscuits
are often very light and airy.


So are good scones.

And it's traditional for them to be
short cylinders about an inch-and-a-half high (4 cm) cut from the dough
with a round cookie cutter. Although home made ones are often little
lumps.


Sounds like scones g. From biscuit recipes I've seen I think plain
scones are very much like biscuits. Pumpkin scones or sultana or date
scones are a little different, but not a lot.

This is a fairly typical sort of plain scone recipe - some recipes use
just milk, recipes for a richer plain scone might include an egg.

2 cups self-raising flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp butter
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup water
extra milk

Sift flour and salt into bowl. Rub in butter till mixture resembles
breadcrumbs. Combine milk and water, pour into bowl and mix to a soft
dough with a knife. Knead very lightly on floured surface until dough is
smooth on the outside. Pat out to a round about 2 cm thick. Cut out
scones with cutter, pressing sharply and evenly, without twisting the
cutter in the dough. Arrange the scones close together, but not touching,
on a greased oven tray. Brush the tops lightly with milk and bake in a
hot oven for 10 to 15 minutes or until golden on top.

Rhonda Anderson
Cranebrook, NSW, Australia


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Source for spice tins? Curt Nelson General Cooking 26 01-09-2006 10:46 PM
Impulse purchase Stark General Cooking 8 28-01-2005 02:24 AM
Twinings Tins Henry Tea 8 19-02-2004 04:42 PM
rats in tins ? Shane D. Maudiss Preserving 7 02-12-2003 09:46 PM
Muffin tins Binky Baking 2 20-10-2003 01:03 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:21 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017