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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Default broken china

The Bubbo wrote:

> After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
> Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
> pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and Friday
> night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>
> I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
> Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the buffet
> crammed full of serving dishes).
>
> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.


Bummer. There is nothing quite like an inheritance to bring out the worst in
siblings. I have seen several families fall apart from fights over their
parents' estates. It's a damned shame. Even the most seemingly fair minded
people sometimes have distorted versions of fairness.

My wife and sister were executors of their father's will. The father had cut the
brother out of his will after an argument with him, but he later relented and
gave him a 20% share with 405 going to each of the other two. When they split
things up they gave him an equal share. They figured that he would have been
upset if he had been short changed and that family harmony was more important
than the money.

A friend of mine was executor of his father's will and one of the assets was a
building that had housed a donut shop which happened to be in his city. His
brother and two sisters are scattered across the country. He had the property
evaluated and arranged the financing to buy it off the estate. The day before the
deal went through his sister called and said that she and the other brother had
discussed it and thought the offer was to low. He told them it wasn't an offer,
that is it. Take it or leave it. Now they are going to have to wait for the
property to be sold, perhaps at a lower price. He is very comfortably retired at
48. He doesn't need the money, but the rest of them do.



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Dave Smith
 
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Default broken china

Jani wrote:

> Personally, I gave up trying to keep a complete set of *anything* years ago.
> I went for colour-coded instead, and now I pick up half-sets, individual
> plates, serving dishes and so on from all sorts of places (charity shops are
> a treasure-trove, especially for antiques) - nothing actually matches, but
> because it's all in the same shades (blue, blue and green, or blue and
> yellow) it .. harmonises, I suppose you'd say. And since they're not full
> sets in the first place, breakages are not so agonising.


I have never been a fan of really fancy dishes, especially the sort that are
easily broken and difficult to replace. I opted for nice every day dishes that
are nice for us and nothing to be embarrassed about using for special company.
When we were first married we went with A Franciscan pattern. A few pieces got
broken, and when I went to replace them I found that the pattern had been
discontinued. When we got down to the point where we needed a new set, I chose
a Johnson Bros. pattern that had been around for years. Damned if that pattern
suddenly got pulled. So when we ran low on cups and saucers it was time to
look for another pattern. We really liked another Johnson Bros. pattern and
bought 8 settings of it. We broke two plates within the first 6 months so I
headed back to the store to order replacements. Son of a gun, that pattern had
been discontinued. Thank goodness there is a place not too far from here were
there is a good stock of some of the discontinued patterns and we got the
replacements. We thought that we were out of luck, but my wife discovered that
there were bread and butter plates available in that pattern, which was odd,
because when we originally bought the place settings there were no bread and
butter plates in that pattern. My wife ordered a bunch of them for herself for
Christmas.



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Dave Smith
 
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Default broken china

Ken wrote:

> > My wife and sister were executors of their father's will. The father had cut the
> > brother out of his will after an argument with him, but he later relented and
> > gave him a 20% share with 405 going to each of the other two. When they split
> > things up they gave him an equal share. They figured that he would have been
> > upset if he had been short changed and that family harmony was more important
> > than the money.

>
> Dave,
>
> I would love to shake your wife's hand, and I certainly hope you know
> what a lucky guy you are. Count your lucky stars, time and time again.


She is a dear woman, as is her sister, who certainly could have used the extra money.

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The Bubbo
 
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Default broken china

After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and Friday
night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.

I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the buffet
crammed full of serving dishes).

After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.

Dammit.


--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Bubbo
 
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Default broken china

Dave Smith wrote:
>
> Bummer. There is nothing quite like an inheritance to bring out the worst

in
> siblings. I have seen several families fall apart from fights over their
> parents' estates. It's a damned shame. Even the most seemingly fair minded
> people sometimes have distorted versions of fairness.
>
> My wife and sister were executors of their father's will. The father had cut

the
> brother out of his will after an argument with him, but he later relented

and
> gave him a 20% share with 405 going to each of the other two. When they

split
> things up they gave him an equal share. They figured that he would have been
> upset if he had been short changed and that family harmony was more

important
> than the money.
>
> A friend of mine was executor of his father's will and one of the assets was

a
> building that had housed a donut shop which happened to be in his city. His
> brother and two sisters are scattered across the country. He had the

property
> evaluated and arranged the financing to buy it off the estate. The day

before the
> deal went through his sister called and said that she and the other brother

had
> discussed it and thought the offer was to low. He told them it wasn't an

offer,
> that is it. Take it or leave it. Now they are going to have to wait for the
> property to be sold, perhaps at a lower price. He is very comfortably

retired at
> 48. He doesn't need the money, but the rest of them do.
>
>
>


Oh, I don't want to give the wrong impression, the 'battle for the china' was
immensely good natured. Also, my mom is very much (thankfully) alive! A few
years after my parents divorced my mom moved to Iowa and then Texas and wanted
to unload excess items, i got the furniture, my sister got the Saab and the
china.

Years later, my sister, realizing she does not really cook or entertain or
anything like that, gave me the china!

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default broken china

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:

> After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
> Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
> pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and Friday
> night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>
> I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
> Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the buffet
> crammed full of serving dishes).
>
> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.
>
> Dammit.


Right. The bum. Accidents happen,
But, frankly, that seems reasonably priced to me.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default broken china

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:

> Years later, my sister, realizing she does not really cook or entertain or
> anything like that, gave me the china!


Ask David to replace the broken plate for your New Year's gift. "-)
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
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The Bubbo
 
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Default broken china

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article >,
> The Bubbo > wrote:
>
>> After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
>> Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
>> pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and

Friday
>> night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>>
>> I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
>> Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the

buffet
>> crammed full of serving dishes).
>>
>> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread

plate
>> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
>> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.
>>
>> Dammit.

>
> Right. The bum. Accidents happen,
> But, frankly, that seems reasonably priced to me.


It's the price to pay to have it. More researched turned out that Marshall
Fields has it for $16.50. They also have soup plates which might be worth
investing in since i have none.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
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P.Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china



The Bubbo wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
>>In article >,
>> The Bubbo > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
>>>Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
>>>pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and

>
> Friday
>
>>>night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>>>
>>>I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
>>>Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the

>
> buffet
>
>>>crammed full of serving dishes).
>>>
>>>After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread

>
> plate
>
>>>and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
>>>thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.
>>>
>>>Dammit.

>>
>>Right. The bum. Accidents happen,
>>But, frankly, that seems reasonably priced to me.

>
>
> It's the price to pay to have it. More researched turned out that Marshall
> Fields has it for $16.50. They also have soup plates which might be worth
> investing in since i have none.
>


It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
display where it is safe.

Peter

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The Bubbo
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

P.Aitken wrote:

> It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
> bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
> get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
> display where it is safe.
>
> Peter
>


welcome to the wonderful world that is me where I worry about everything and
everything is a source of anxiety.

I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think it's
pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place settings
that I have complete.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!


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serene
 
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Default broken china

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 00:11:47 GMT, "P.Aitken" > wrote:

>It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
>bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
>get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
>display where it is safe.


My thought exactly.

I used my Noritake (white-on-white, trimmed in 24K gold) as an
everyday plate, because (a) things break, and that's part of their
beauty, and (b) I'm worth my finest china.

serene
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King's Crown
 
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Default broken china

> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread
> plate
> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.
>


All the dishes I use are antiques and give me a great pleasure to use them.
Yes, they get broken on occasion. I've found ebay and Replacements.com
great sources to pick things up. If it's a piece you can wait until
Replacements has a sale or find an auction on ebay that no one seems
interested in you can replace some things cheaper.

Lynne


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Jani
 
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Default broken china


"The Bubbo" > wrote in message
...
> P.Aitken wrote:
>
>> It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
>> bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
>> get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
>> display where it is safe.
>>
>> Peter
>>

>
> welcome to the wonderful world that is me where I worry about everything
> and
> everything is a source of anxiety.
>
> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think
> it's
> pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place settings
> that I have complete.


Back in the dark ages when I was a student, I did a stint as au pair for a
family in Switzerland, who had Wedgwood plates for everyday use. They also
had two small children, as well as a dishwasher apparently constructed to
take a bite out of everything it washed. Accidents waiting to happen,
basically

Use your china, if you don't want it to be display-only, but don't get too
wound up when you lose a piece. Replacements exist, and it was meant to be
used, not put in a museum, after all

Personally, I gave up trying to keep a complete set of *anything* years ago.
I went for colour-coded instead, and now I pick up half-sets, individual
plates, serving dishes and so on from all sorts of places (charity shops are
a treasure-trove, especially for antiques) - nothing actually matches, but
because it's all in the same shades (blue, blue and green, or blue and
yellow) it .. harmonises, I suppose you'd say. And since they're not full
sets in the first place, breakages are not so agonising.

Jani



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Puester
 
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Default broken china

The Bubbo wrote:
> After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
> Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
> pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and Friday
> night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>
> I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
> Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the buffet
> crammed full of serving dishes).
>
> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.
>
> Dammit.
>
>


Think of it as a nice legacy and replace the plate. Be thankful that
it's still available.

gloria p
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Dee Randall
 
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Default broken china


"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> The Bubbo wrote:
>
>> After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
>> Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab
>> was
>> pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and
>> Friday
>> night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>>
>> I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
>> Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the
>> buffet
>> crammed full of serving dishes).
>>
>> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread
>> plate
>> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
>> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.

>

You can be thankful that your set was complete; I know you are. I inherited
a set of china from my in-laws after m-i-l died. When DH was cleaning out
the house and adjoining structures, he found in a garage under an oil-soaked
rag with a heavy tool on top of it, belonging to the set, a soup Tureen with
Lid which I can replace at Replacements.com for $429.95. Of course, I will
never replace it. I'm not down grading your loss; I know the feeling,
having dropped and broken in a blink-of-an-eye, a cup to a 8-piece set of
china; the cup costing around $50 if it is the correct one.
But if you are going to replace it, do it now, or it will be lost forever.
I'm glad you were able to use your lovely set with a holiday dinner. What
happiness!

Afterthought:
My ex-husband 40 years ago got in the property settlement a solid cherry
buffet that I had chosen. His next (3rd) wife used it, I saw it and still
coveted it. He died while he was married to his 4th wife. I was so crass as
to call her and ask her if I could have it/buy it, whatever. She told me to
get lost -- tee hee -- ha ha! I'm still thinking about that beautiful
buffet - there'll never be another one like it. Maybe when I get to the
pearly gates, it'll be there in my furnished apartment.
Dee Dee




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Dee Randall
 
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Default broken china


"serene" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 00:11:47 GMT, "P.Aitken" > wrote:
>
>>It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
>>bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
>>get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
>>display where it is safe.

>
> My thought exactly.
>
> I used my Noritake (white-on-white, trimmed in 24K gold) as an
> everyday plate, because (a) things break, and that's part of their
> beauty, and (b) I'm worth my finest china.
>
> serene


I believe this is the classic Noritake one sees and is quite elegant. Does
it ever go in the dishwasher -- that is, if one is at your home? I have a
few plates that are even too large for my dishwasher, so washing plates is
not my favorite pasttime. Not that I don't do it often though; just
wondering about these particular plates.
My own china has gold rims and I don't put it in the dishwasher, so I don't
use it much; I'd like to, but I don't like the looks of faded gold on plates
because it reminds me of used restaurant china (which I don't care for).
Funny, though I have a small set of Chinese plates and bowls (made in Japan)
I bought from a restaurant outlet (you know, with the dragons, etc.) and
I've used them for years in the dishwasher and the gold rim is still there,
pretty darned good after many years in the dishwasher.
Yes, you are indeed worth the very finest of china; that's a given.
Dee Dee


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Ken
 
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Default broken china

> My wife and sister were executors of their father's will. The father had cut the
> brother out of his will after an argument with him, but he later relented and
> gave him a 20% share with 405 going to each of the other two. When they split
> things up they gave him an equal share. They figured that he would have been
> upset if he had been short changed and that family harmony was more important
> than the money.


Dave,

I would love to shake your wife's hand, and I certainly hope you know
what a lucky guy you are. Count your lucky stars, time and time again.

Ken

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sf
 
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Default broken china

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 00:16:36 GMT, The Bubbo wrote:

>
> welcome to the wonderful world that is me where I worry about everything and
> everything is a source of anxiety.
>
> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think it's
> pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place settings
> that I have complete.


If it can be easily replaced at Marshall Fields, then it's not a
problem. Real problems arise when the pattern is no longer
manufactured. Accidents happen and that's why I buy 12 instead of 8.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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sf
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 16:18:40 -0800, serene wrote:

> On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 00:11:47 GMT, "P.Aitken" > wrote:
>
> >It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
> >bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
> >get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
> >display where it is safe.

>
> My thought exactly.
>
> I used my Noritake (white-on-white, trimmed in 24K gold) as an
> everyday plate, because (a) things break, and that's part of their
> beauty, and (b) I'm worth my finest china.
>

I have everyday china and special occasion china. The every day is
stuff I can replace easily if a piece is broken. Replacing my special
occasion china requires research and plenty of $$, so I'm very careful
with it now, especially after replacing a piece with another one that
was the right pattern, but didn't have the right feel, weight,
thickness... it was noticeably "different".

Oh, well. Life went on anyway.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
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ntantiques
 
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Default broken china


The Bubbo wrote:
> After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
> Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
> pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and Friday
> night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
>
> I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
> Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the buffet
> crammed full of serving dishes).
>
> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.


My Mom's china was an obscure 1950's Royal Doulton pattern that (even
in my years as an antiques dealer) I've never seen anywhere else. When
she died, my Dad remarried & I saw precious little of the china, but
always remembered it fondly. After my Dad & Stepmother died a few
years ago their daughters divided their estate. I was delighted to walk
away with the remnants of Mom's Royal Doulton service for 8. Over the
years there'd been significant breakage and I was down to a complete
service for 5. After suffering severe sticker shock at the
Replacements website, I tried ebay & w/in a month scored every piece I
needed to restore the service to its full glory...for a tenth of the
cost at Replacements. If I were you I'd give ebay a whirl.

Nancy T



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Steve Pope
 
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Default broken china

On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 16:18:40 -0800, serene wrote:

> I used my Noritake (white-on-white, trimmed in 24K gold) as an
> everyday plate, because (a) things break, and that's part of their
> beauty, and (b) I'm worth my finest china.


For some reason I was lucky enough to end up with my mother's
Noritake china (it says "made in occupied Japan"; no idea if
the gold trim is 24K or not). We don't use it everyday, not so
much that it is too delicate/precious, but that it's wrong-sized;
the soup dishes are too small for eating a bowl of chili out of,
the dinner plates are on the small side too -- you could never
eat a leek off of one, it would flop over the edges. I like
to use 12" presentation plates as dinner plates (they mostly
came from Crate and Barrel, but if you want some nice ones,
go to Fish Eddy's), and we have outsized stoneware soup bowls
made by a local artisan. (He just offered to manufacture some
more of the bowls for us, as a special as he has sinced moved
into figurines.) But we do use the china soup bowls and dinner
plates for some dinners, and the smaller china salad and dessert
plates for some appetizers.

There were some china pieces missing to begin with, and a
few more have broken under our custody, but I have no plans
to replace them just for completion.

Steve
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Dan Abel
 
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Default broken china

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:


> After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
> and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.


Many years ago, several of us went to somebody's house. Everything was
perfect. Her nails were perfect, the house was perfect, her makeup was
perfect and her kids were perfect. I felt sorry for her kids. That's
not fun. She served us some little food item on little plates. She
made a big point about how the plates were rimmed in platinum and cost
US$90.00 each. I couldn't wait to finish the food and give the plate
back.

--
Dan Abel

Petaluma, California, USA
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Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:

> P.Aitken wrote:
>
> > It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
> > bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
> > get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
> > display where it is safe.
> >
> > Peter
> >

>
> welcome to the wonderful world that is me where I worry about everything and
> everything is a source of anxiety.
>
> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think it's
> pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place settings
> that I have complete.


And don't let anyone try to convince you that there's anything wrong
with that plan, Kiddo. Sure, they break if not handled carefully. And
those "special occasion only" things are often what 'make' the memory.
Nice to recall when you're older. A friend has her mom's Haviland china
- it is very, very beautiful - and she uses it for Christmas, I think.
And she washes it by hand - alone. Puts a towel at the bottom of the
sink. And you can bet that she remembers her mom and those special
times when she does. A person could do worse.

While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
loan.

And may all your memories of its use be joyous ones.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

In article . com>,
"ntantiques" > wrote:

> Over the years there'd been significant breakage and I was down to a
> complete service for 5. After suffering severe sticker shock at the
> Replacements website, I tried ebay & w/in a month scored every piece
> I needed to restore the service to its full glory...for a tenth of
> the cost at Replacements.
>
> Nancy T


Yeay, Nancy!! I've never met a dish I didn't like. "-)
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china


"Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> The Bubbo > wrote:
>
>> P.Aitken wrote:
>>
>> > It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you. Why
>> > bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore will
>> > get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put it on
>> > display where it is safe.
>> >
>> > Peter
>> >

>>
>> welcome to the wonderful world that is me where I worry about everything
>> and
>> everything is a source of anxiety.
>>
>> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think
>> it's
>> pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place
>> settings
>> that I have complete.

>
> And don't let anyone try to convince you that there's anything wrong
> with that plan, Kiddo. Sure, they break if not handled carefully. And
> those "special occasion only" things are often what 'make' the memory.
> Nice to recall when you're older. A friend has her mom's Haviland china
> - it is very, very beautiful - and she uses it for Christmas, I think.
> And she washes it by hand - alone. Puts a towel at the bottom of the
> sink. And you can bet that she remembers her mom and those special
> times when she does. A person could do worse.


Haviland is the old china I have inherited that I said the replacement for
the tureen was $$$. It is old, thin and fragile. And it has been used by
the family, well used. But I am very careful of it.
I remember when I was a teen that we visited a home for dinner, the likes of
which I'd never seen before, and they insisted that I come in to dry the
crystal. I don't know what they were thinking. They told me to be careful,
but I didn't even know what crystal was, but from their admonitions, I knew
it was dear.
Dee Dee




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon 26 Dec 2005 08:36:43a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's
Jammin'?

> In article >,
> The Bubbo > wrote:
>
>> P.Aitken wrote:
>>
>> > It sounds like this china is nothing but a source of worry for you.
>> > Why bother - to impress people? It is meant to be used, and therefore
>> > will get broken. Enjoy it and accept the inevitable breakage - or put
>> > it on display where it is safe.
>> >
>> > Peter
>> >

>>
>> welcome to the wonderful world that is me where I worry about
>> everything and everything is a source of anxiety.
>>
>> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I
>> think it's pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8
>> place settings that I have complete.

>
> And don't let anyone try to convince you that there's anything wrong
> with that plan, Kiddo. Sure, they break if not handled carefully. And
> those "special occasion only" things are often what 'make' the memory.
> Nice to recall when you're older. A friend has her mom's Haviland china
> - it is very, very beautiful - and she uses it for Christmas, I think.
> And she washes it by hand - alone. Puts a towel at the bottom of the
> sink. And you can bet that she remembers her mom and those special
> times when she does. A person could do worse.
>
> While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
> shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
> Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
> remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
> occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
> loan.
>
> And may all your memories of its use be joyous ones.


I totally agree, Barb. I have two sets of good china, an extensive set of
Wedgewood that I collected while in my twenties, and a set of Royal Jackson
that I inherited from my mother.

We use the Wedgewood at least once a month. I would use it daily if it
weren't for the raised border that requires storing with separators to
prevent damage to the border. However, it does go into the dishwasher.

We only use the Royal Jackson a couple of times a year because it requires
hand-washing due to the gold rim that predates a glaze fired over the gold.
It's particularly precious to me because I remember my parents inheriting
it when I was 5 years old.

I have only broken one piece of Wedgewood over the years and replaced it
promptly. There are 16 place settings of the Royal Jackson and a few
dessert plates were broken all at once many years ago. I've never replaced
them because I still have 11 or 12 and would never use more than that.

The memories count big time!

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
The Bubbo
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

Melba's Jammin' wrote:

>>
>> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think

it's
>> pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place settings
>> that I have complete.

>
> And don't let anyone try to convince you that there's anything wrong
> with that plan, Kiddo. Sure, they break if not handled carefully. And
> those "special occasion only" things are often what 'make' the memory.
> Nice to recall when you're older. A friend has her mom's Haviland china
> - it is very, very beautiful - and she uses it for Christmas, I think.
> And she washes it by hand - alone. Puts a towel at the bottom of the
> sink. And you can bet that she remembers her mom and those special
> times when she does. A person could do worse.
>
> While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
> shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
> Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
> remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
> occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
> loan.
>
> And may all your memories of its use be joyous ones.


I have this other set of china that I know almost nothign about. My ex-MIL
gave it to me, it had been a grandmother's at some point. She said it was
'soapbox china', given away piece by piece in boxes of detergent IIRC. It's
white with a light green, almost Grecian pattern. The funny thing about it is
some of it's Noritake, some say H&Co Selb Bavaria, some say H&Co Magjya. It's
a real mix of manufacturers but the pattern is the same. I'd like to get more
just to fill out the collection but I can't even figure out what to search
for!

Also, I think it made my mom incredibly happy to have me serving dinner on her
china. I even made after-dinner coffee and served it in the cups with saucers,
filled the sugar and creamer, and the coffee pot.

When I'm alone I do fill the teapot and get out a cup and saucer and sit
quietly, reading and remembering when I would have a cold or ear infectin and
my mom would make me a pot of tea and serve it to me in the china to make me
feel better.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
> >>
> >> I like the china, I like to eat off it and I like servinbg on it. I think

> it's
> >> pretty. I know things will break but I'd like to keep the 8 place settings
> >> that I have complete.

> >
> > And don't let anyone try to convince you that there's anything wrong
> > with that plan, Kiddo. Sure, they break if not handled carefully. And
> > those "special occasion only" things are often what 'make' the memory.
> > Nice to recall when you're older. A friend has her mom's Haviland china
> > - it is very, very beautiful - and she uses it for Christmas, I think.
> > And she washes it by hand - alone. Puts a towel at the bottom of the
> > sink. And you can bet that she remembers her mom and those special
> > times when she does. A person could do worse.
> >
> > While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
> > shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
> > Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
> > remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
> > occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
> > loan.
> >
> > And may all your memories of its use be joyous ones.

>
> I have this other set of china that I know almost nothign about. My ex-MIL
> gave it to me, it had been a grandmother's at some point. She said it was
> 'soapbox china', given away piece by piece in boxes of detergent IIRC. It's
> white with a light green, almost Grecian pattern. The funny thing about it is
> some of it's Noritake, some say H&Co Selb Bavaria, some say H&Co Magjya. It's
> a real mix of manufacturers but the pattern is the same. I'd like to get more
> just to fill out the collection but I can't even figure out what to search
> for!
>
> Also, I think it made my mom incredibly happy to have me serving dinner on her
> china. I even made after-dinner coffee and served it in the cups with saucers,
> filled the sugar and creamer, and the coffee pot.
>
> When I'm alone I do fill the teapot and get out a cup and saucer and sit
> quietly, reading and remembering when I would have a cold or ear infectin and
> my mom would make me a pot of tea and serve it to me in the china to make me
> feel better.


There you go, Toots! Memories give meaning to Stuff.
There's a china replacement place in Excelsior. We could go there, too,
for a look and a holler. China Replacements? Bet you could find it
with a search or four.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
sf
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 06:10:19 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

> There were some china pieces missing to begin with, and a
> few more have broken under our custody, but I have no plans
> to replace them just for completion.


I'm not a complete set person myself. I sold the teacups to my
everyday china at a garage sale for 50 each - so I made someone very
happy. I have two sets of fine china dinner plates only and one full
set of china, right down to bullion cups... remember those?
Obviously, the only china I've bought is the everyday stuff. I love
finding dessert plates in antique stores. Once time, I found 12
Haviland dessert plates (perfect condition) at something like $1 each.
Mostly I use glass though and I have scads. I use mugs instead of
cups for coffee & tea. They are completely white and quite formal
looking. I got them from Cost Plus and Pier One many many years ago.

Like a previous poster, I like to mix and match... but I'm not in a
position where I need or want to find a lot of different patterns in
one color family. What I'm thinking of doing next is buying the
collector set boxes of blue Spode. I love the color and most of the
patterns... but I'd need even more storage space.

Now, shall we talk about crystal and fine glassware? LOLOL
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 09:36:43 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
> wrote:

> While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
> shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
> Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
> remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
> occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
> loan.


And you're leaving these to me in your will, right ... Mom?

They're beautiful!

Carol


  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 16:57:52 GMT, The Bubbo >
wrote:

> When I'm alone I do fill the teapot and get out a cup and saucer and sit
> quietly, reading and remembering when I would have a cold or ear infectin and
> my mom would make me a pot of tea and serve it to me in the china to make me
> feel better.


*SMILE*

Thanks for sharing that.
Carol
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
sf
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On 26 Dec 2005 17:16:25 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> Royal Jackson


You made me google an image and there are lots of Royal Jacksons! It
looks like Margaret Rose could be yours, if so... it's very pretty,
sir! Reminds me of my Wedgewood, Conway pattern. I won't make you
google it: http://tinyurl.com/bahtq Hmmm. The prices are pretty
good there, maybe I'll replace that icky replacement dinner plate I
got at replacements unlimited or whatever it's called.

--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

.. It's
> white with a light green, almost Grecian pattern. The funny thing about it
> is
> some of it's Noritake, some say H&Co Selb Bavaria, some say H&Co Magjya.
> It's
> a real mix of manufacturers but the pattern is the same. I'd like to get
> more
> just to fill out the collection but I can't even figure out what to search
> for!
>
> .:Heather:.


When I was looking for the Haviland china, I took a picture of it and
emailed it to replacements.com and within a few days they told me what it
was.
This is something you might want to do sometime, too. Good luck.
Dee Dee


  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon 26 Dec 2005 03:13:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?

> On 26 Dec 2005 17:16:25 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>
>> Royal Jackson

>
> You made me google an image and there are lots of Royal Jacksons! It
> looks like Margaret Rose could be yours, if so... it's very pretty,
> sir! Reminds me of my Wedgewood, Conway pattern. I won't make you
> google it: http://tinyurl.com/bahtq Hmmm. The prices are pretty
> good there, maybe I'll replace that icky replacement dinner plate I
> got at replacements unlimited or whatever it's called.
>
> --
>
> Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
>


No, my Royal Jackson pattern is Cherry Branch. My mom always though it
looked like Christmas china.

http://www.replacements.com/webquote/ROJCHB.htm

My Wedgewood is the Queensware Shell Edge, Cream on Lavender.

http://www.replacements.com/webquote/WW_CCLS.htm

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Bubbo
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 16:57:52 GMT, The Bubbo >
> wrote:
>
>> When I'm alone I do fill the teapot and get out a cup and saucer and sit
>> quietly, reading and remembering when I would have a cold or ear infectin

and
>> my mom would make me a pot of tea and serve it to me in the china to make

me
>> feel better.

>
> *SMILE*
>
> Thanks for sharing that.
> Carol


I always have to remember that for as much as my mom makes me crazy, she's
incredible in a crisis. When I left my ex I showed up on her doorstep with an
hour's notice, just the clothes I was wearing and she took care of me the
whole weekend. She's good that way.

Now I am just patiently waiting for the christmas china...

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Christine Dabney
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On 26 Dec 2005 17:16:25 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> wrote:

>On Mon 26 Dec 2005 08:36:43a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's
>Jammin'?



>> While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
>> shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
>> Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
>> remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
>> occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
>> loan.
>>
>> And may all your memories of its use be joyous ones.

>
>I totally agree, Barb. I have two sets of good china, an extensive set of
>Wedgewood that I collected while in my twenties, and a set of Royal Jackson
>that I inherited from my mother.


I like your idea, Barb.

I inherited half of my mother's china (don't ask why only half), and
when I settle down again I plan to find the pieces to make it a full
set, and then some.

My mother's pattern is no longer made, and I have found it at
Replacements,Ltd. This is the pattern:
http://www.replacements.com/webquote...tm?s1=KX&7082&

I have only 2 soup bowls/plates, and about 4-5 dinner plates from that
set. Plus one of the serving platters, and some of the little bowls.
And salad plates.

It looks like a pretty extensive set, and I am lusting after some of
the other less common pieces.

Before she died, my mother was using it regularly instead of just for
company occasions. That and the good silver, which I did inherit in
it's entirety. I would love to start using it that way also, not just
for the most formal occasions. But I think that gold banding around
the rims probably is not dishwasher safe, and I am very leary of
washing this china anyway, in the dishwasher.

Now, if I could only find some of the lovely glasses I inherited from
my great aunt... And the dishes that she gave me, which were simply
called a "breakfast set".

Christine

  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon 26 Dec 2005 03:13:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?

> On 26 Dec 2005 17:16:25 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>
>> Royal Jackson

>
> You made me google an image and there are lots of Royal Jacksons! It
> looks like Margaret Rose could be yours, if so... it's very pretty,
> sir! Reminds me of my Wedgewood, Conway pattern. I won't make you
> google it: http://tinyurl.com/bahtq Hmmm. The prices are pretty
> good there, maybe I'll replace that icky replacement dinner plate I
> got at replacements unlimited or whatever it's called.


I did google it, and the Margaret Rose pattern is very pretty. My mother
would probably have liked it better than the Cherry Branch she had, although
I really love the Cherry Branch.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 09:36:43 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
> > wrote:
>
> > While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
> > shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
> > Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
> > remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
> > occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
> > loan.

>
> And you're leaving these to me in your will, right ... Mom?
>
> They're beautiful!
>
> Carol


Thanks, Sweetie. Aren't they gorgeous? I have a boatload of serving
pieces and accessories, too. About four years after I first started
acquiring them (in the mid-'80s) I ran into a sale at Marshall's. I
bought a bunch. There are glasses, too, with the motif. I've got it
all on a database. Let's see. . . . . Beck's exact words when I just
told her (we're at her place right now) were "Hah! Yeah, right. In HER
dreams." Let me tell you a little story about that: I once asked my
daughter what, of my Stuff, she wants when I croak. Well, now, she
*promptly* replied, "The sterling, your diamond bracelet, the Christmas
dishes, and your good china and crystal." MY reply was, "Jeez, have
been thinking about this MUCH? It didn't take you long at long at all
to come up with that list." LOL. I keep telling her that I love other
people in my life, too, and that she shouldn't expect EVERYTHING. I
don't think she believes me.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default broken china

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 17:56:38 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
> wrote:

> In article >,
> Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>
> > On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 09:36:43 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
> > > wrote:
> >
> > > While you're at it (buying the replacement), get two and save on the
> > > shipping and you'll be even next time one breaks. I have Block
> > > Poinsettia, <http://tinyurl.com/8uymx> service for 12 or 16 (I can't
> > > remember) and a spare cup and saucer and dinner plate for just such an
> > > occurrence and for when the stuff is tough to find and acquire without a
> > > loan.

> >
> > And you're leaving these to me in your will, right ... Mom?
> >
> > They're beautiful!
> >
> > Carol

>
> Thanks, Sweetie. Aren't they gorgeous? I have a boatload of serving
> pieces and accessories, too. About four years after I first started
> acquiring them (in the mid-'80s) I ran into a sale at Marshall's. I
> bought a bunch. There are glasses, too, with the motif. I've got it
> all on a database. Let's see. . . . . Beck's exact words when I just
> told her (we're at her place right now) were "Hah! Yeah, right. In HER
> dreams." Let me tell you a little story about that: I once asked my
> daughter what, of my Stuff, she wants when I croak. Well, now, she
> *promptly* replied, "The sterling, your diamond bracelet, the Christmas
> dishes, and your good china and crystal." MY reply was, "Jeez, have
> been thinking about this MUCH? It didn't take you long at long at all
> to come up with that list." LOL. I keep telling her that I love other
> people in my life, too, and that she shouldn't expect EVERYTHING. I
> don't think she believes me.


Well, tell her who's getting the Block Poinsetta stuff, so she doesn't
have her heart broken when you do get around to passing. Personally,
I think you're too ornery to die. ;-)

Carol
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Jessica V.
 
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Default broken china


ntantiques wrote:
> The Bubbo wrote:
> > After much finagling and sibling rivalry I managed to inherit my mother's
> > Wedgwood china (I think my argument that my mom gave my sister the Saab was
> > pretty much the end of the debate). I've had this china since May and Friday
> > night was the first time I'd really gotten to use it.
> >
> > I had a complete set of Wedgwood before, but my ex got that in the Great
> > Division of Property (I also lost my KA food processor, but I got the buffet
> > crammed full of serving dishes).
> >
> > After the night of the first real use, David accidentally drops a bread plate
> > and shatters it. I'm not mad, i know it was an accident, but that damned
> > thing, that small 6 inch plate, costs $23 plus shipping.

>
> My Mom's china was an obscure 1950's Royal Doulton pattern that (even
> in my years as an antiques dealer) I've never seen anywhere else. When
> she died, my Dad remarried & I saw precious little of the china, but
> always remembered it fondly. After my Dad & Stepmother died a few
> years ago their daughters divided their estate. I was delighted to walk
> away with the remnants of Mom's Royal Doulton service for 8. Over the
> years there'd been significant breakage and I was down to a complete
> service for 5. After suffering severe sticker shock at the
> Replacements website, I tried ebay & w/in a month scored every piece I
> needed to restore the service to its full glory...for a tenth of the
> cost at Replacements. If I were you I'd give ebay a whirl.
>
> Nancy T


Being in the trade doesn't make it any easier to find the stuff
sometimes does it? I've been searching for the past four years for the
pieces I need to fill in what was once service for 24.
Gr.-Grandmother-in-Law bought the set around 1910 at Gumps in San Fran
and had it shipped back to Boston. Adams Titian Ware in the Alcazar
pattern seems next to non-existant on the east coast, Ebay has been
kind to me on uncommon pieces but oatmeal bowls seem near impossible to
locate. None of my dinnerware patterns are still active but this is
the hardest to find, filling in her missing Rose Medalion pieces was
exponentially easier.

Jessica

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