General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #76 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 05:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Umbellifers was Venison

Phil C. wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 22:18:06 GMT, "graham" wrote:

I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
such an important source of food, herbs and spices.


As I recall, water parsley is deadly poisonous and hemlock is also one
of the family. Don't try this at home. I wonder if our distant
ancestors had to treat parsnips to detoxify them and gradually bred
the poisons out. Perhaps they were used for "medicinal" properties
before they became ordinary vegetables. But then all sorts of foods
are poisonous if we eat enough, don't prepare them properly or are
unlucky enough to be susceptible. Some beans are well known for
containing arsenic and even potatoes are poisonous if we eat an
unfeasibly large amount. Others may know more.


I have some books on the topic, and if I spend any longer working on
*that* document I'll be quite, quite mad...

**NOTE: READ AT YOUR OWN RISK. I AM NOT ADVISING ANYONE TO TRY ANY OF
THIS. ANY PLANT CAN BE HARMFUL WHEN INGESTED. Some EXTREMELY POISONOUS
plants (such as Fool's Parsley) can be easily confused with the
following interesting plants**

Launert (Edible and Medicinal Plants of Britain and Northern Europe)
declares Wild Parsnip to be edible: the root (best collected in late
autumn or winter[1], when it's at its sweetest) should be blanched in
boiling salted water to remove its 'sharp flavour', as should the older
leaves. Young leaves and shoots can be added to soups, roots treated as
carrots (after blanching). Both he and de Rougemont (Crops of Britain
and Europe) place Wild Parsnip in the same Genus and spp as cultivated,
although apparently some people put Wild Parsnip in a separate
subspecies. DR says Parsnip has been cultivated since Roman times, but
'superior forms' probably developed after the Middle Ages.

Interestingly, Launert gives only medicinal uses for Wild Carrot (juice
of the root for nervous or physical exhaustion, dropsy and internal
inflammation; must be taken for long periods), freshly grated roots good
against worms in children, dried powdered root to treat diarrhoea in
babi... excuse me a moment: READ THE NOTE AT THE TOP AGAIN! I have in
fact nibbled on roots of wild carrot without ill effect, but not much
pleasure either. I should try some wild parsnip sometime, but I'd want
to mark the plants in high summer to avoid confusion with the really
nasty relatives.

regards
sarah



[1] Makes sense. Winter/early spring is when people were hungriest, too.


--
Think of it as evolution in action.

  #77 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 05:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Allotment films was Venison

The Reid wrote:

Following up to The Reid

"carry on up the allotment" would have worked.


or "Dig for Victory"


You *have* been daydreaming, haven't you? :-)

I don't dig it, man, I've got a raised bed. Do I have to smirk when I
type that?

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #78 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 08:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Phil C.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Umbellifers was Venison

On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 17:35:53 +0000, (sarah)
wrote:

Phil C. wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 22:18:06 GMT, "graham" wrote:

I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
such an important source of food, herbs and spices.


As I recall, water parsley is deadly poisonous and hemlock is also one
of the family. Don't try this at home. I wonder if our distant
ancestors had to treat parsnips to detoxify them and gradually bred
the poisons out. Perhaps they were used for "medicinal" properties
before they became ordinary vegetables. But then all sorts of foods
are poisonous if we eat enough, don't prepare them properly or are
unlucky enough to be susceptible. Some beans are well known for
containing arsenic and even potatoes are poisonous if we eat an
unfeasibly large amount. Others may know more.


I have some books on the topic, and if I spend any longer working on
*that* document I'll be quite, quite mad...

**NOTE: READ AT YOUR OWN RISK. I AM NOT ADVISING ANYONE TO TRY ANY OF
THIS. ANY PLANT CAN BE HARMFUL WHEN INGESTED. Some EXTREMELY POISONOUS
plants (such as Fool's Parsley) can be easily confused with the
following interesting plants**

(snip)
I should have written "water parsnip", though wild plants are prone to
a variety of confusing names. I'd tend to treat umbellifera like fungi
- best avoided unless one is really sure. Even hemlock looks much like
the others.

We get no shortage of keck (cow parsley) growing in the lawn. It's a
nuisance but when I mow it, it produces a lovely/horrible (delete as
appropriate) coriander smell.
--
Phil C.
  #79 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison


"The Reid" wrote in message
...
Following up to graham

Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could
we
include her as a love interest?


How much love interest is this film having?


I was just trying to balance the lust interest:-)

Graham


  #80 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 09:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
June Hughes
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

In message [email protected], graham
writes

"The Reid" wrote in message
.. .
Following up to graham

Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could
we
include her as a love interest?


How much love interest is this film having?


I was just trying to balance the lust interest:-)

Humph! Typical Man
--
June Hughes


  #81 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-12-2005, 08:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Allotment films was Venison

Following up to sarah

I've got a raised bed. Do I have to smirk when I
type that?


its compulsory i'm afraid.
--
Mike Reid
"Christmas is the Disneyfication of Christianity" Don Cupitt (theologian)
"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/happyxmas.htm"


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Venison Dip [email protected] Recipes (moderated) 0 14-01-2007 01:27 AM
Venison Steve M General Cooking 1 13-02-2006 05:38 AM
Venison ~patches~ General Cooking 16 10-11-2005 06:09 PM
Venison in NYC markmas Restaurants 12 24-10-2005 10:25 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017