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  #46 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 01:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

Following up to sarah

that's one I don't like at all. I'm not convinced its even food.


I won't try to convince you; all the more for meeeeeee! I hope to grow
it one day, because every hour between plant and table decreases the
flavour and sweetness.


its easy enough to grow, foxes go for it though.

When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
think I burst into tears and ran from the table!


all together ahhhhhhhhhh.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap

  #47 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 01:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default beef was Venison

Following up to sarah

Only regret is that most of it is still in their freezers until we can
get the wiring to the garage sorted and put a chest freezer in :-(


you really *do* like bulk buying, don't you? Is it you can take
the Canadian out of Canada but you cant take Canada out of the
Canadian? :-)
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 04:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
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Default beef was Venison

The Reid wrote:

Following up to sarah

Only regret is that most of it is still in their freezers until we can
get the wiring to the garage sorted and put a chest freezer in :-(


you really *do* like bulk buying, don't you? Is it you can take
the Canadian out of Canada but you cant take Canada out of the
Canadian? :-)


Look, at UKP7/kg, I'll take as much as I think we can eat :-)

regards
sarah

--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #49 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 04:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

The Reid wrote:

Following up to sarah

that's one I don't like at all. I'm not convinced its even food.


I won't try to convince you; all the more for meeeeeee! I hope to grow
it one day, because every hour between plant and table decreases the
flavour and sweetness.


its easy enough to grow, foxes go for it though.

When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
think I burst into tears and ran from the table!


all together ahhhhhhhhhh.


I've just *really* realised all of this has been x-posted to
rec.food.cooking. But no one's commented, so perhaps we're alone in here
:-)

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #50 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 04:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
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Default Venison

The Reid wrote:

Following up to sarah

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants;


not happened to me but its sap makes your skin hypersensitive to
sunlight, causing burns.


Yup. I've experimented with that in some of its wild relatives. The
numbness is strange, though. I should ask him if he's noticed it.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.


  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 05:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Doctor J. Frink
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah wrote:

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
first food allergy!


I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
(as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.

Frink

--
Doctor J. Frink : 'Rampant Ribald Ringtail'
See his mind here : http://www.cmp.liv.ac.uk/frink/
Annoy his mind here : pjf at cmp dot liv dot ack dot ook
"No sir, I didn't like it!" - Mr Horse
  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 05:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

Doctor J. Frink wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah wrote:

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
first food allergy!


I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
(as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.


I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

regards
sarah

--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 06:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison


"sarah" wrote in message
...
Doctor J. Frink wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah wrote:

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
first food allergy!


I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
(as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.


I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?
Graham


  #54 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 07:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
S Viemeister
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote
I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?

It's certainly a feature of the Giant Hogweed.
  #55 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
Doctor J. Frink wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah wrote:

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
first food allergy!

I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
(as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.


I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?


I don't know, but it's possible, perhaps to a lesser extent. The
compounds involved are psoralens and furanocoumarins. There are records
of contact dermatitis suffered by people working with carrots, angelica,
and dill to name some of the more popular plants; others, such as Giant
Hogweed (_Hieraceum mantegazzianum_, from memory!) are very dangerous. I
tested the Wild Parsnip to judge whether the results were sufficiently
severe to have put two lads in hospital with what were diagnosed as
'chemical burns' on their legs. The answer was most definitely 'Yes',
and I'd add I have *never* itched so much from anything before (but then
I don't think I ever encountered Poison Ivy).

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.


  #56 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2005, 10:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison


"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
Doctor J. Frink wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah
wrote:

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or
two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know
it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if
some
roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
first food allergy!

I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain
toxins
(as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well
and
thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.

I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?


I don't know, but it's possible, perhaps to a lesser extent. The
compounds involved are psoralens and furanocoumarins. There are records
of contact dermatitis suffered by people working with carrots, angelica,
and dill to name some of the more popular plants; others, such as Giant
Hogweed (_Hieraceum mantegazzianum_, from memory!) are very dangerous. I
tested the Wild Parsnip to judge whether the results were sufficiently
severe to have put two lads in hospital with what were diagnosed as
'chemical burns' on their legs. The answer was most definitely 'Yes',
and I'd add I have *never* itched so much from anything before (but then
I don't think I ever encountered Poison Ivy).

I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
such an important source of food, herbs and spices.
Graham


  #57 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 07:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
Doctor J. Frink wrote:

[-]
I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain
toxins (as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when
exposed to sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well
and thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might
help.

I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?


I don't know, but it's possible, perhaps to a lesser extent. The
compounds involved are psoralens and furanocoumarins. There are records
of contact dermatitis suffered by people working with carrots, angelica,
and dill to name some of the more popular plants; others, such as Giant
Hogweed (_Hieraceum mantegazzianum_, from memory!) are very dangerous. I
tested the Wild Parsnip to judge whether the results were sufficiently
severe to have put two lads in hospital with what were diagnosed as
'chemical burns' on their legs. The answer was most definitely 'Yes',
and I'd add I have *never* itched so much from anything before (but then
I don't think I ever encountered Poison Ivy).

I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
such an important source of food, herbs and spices.


I've never reacted to carrots or dill -- it's usually people who harvest
or otherwise work with the plants a lot who develop sensitivities.
Hogweed/Wild Parsnip are unusual in the degree and speed of reaction.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #58 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 09:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Gregoire Kretz
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

sarah wrote:

The Reid wrote:

Following up to sarah

When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
think I burst into tears and ran from the table!


all together ahhhhhhhhhh.


I've just *really* realised all of this has been x-posted to
rec.food.cooking. But no one's commented, so perhaps we're alone in here
:-)


I think you'll find most posters to both groups have also lost milkteeth
at one point or another in the past.


Greg

--

That time's long past, but what would I not give
To see the whorehouse where we used to live.
No spam: ficus = no(n)
  #59 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 10:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default beef was Venison

Following up to sarah

Look, at UKP7/kg, I'll take as much as I think we can eat :-)


I thought you would riposte about my wine buying! :*)
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap


  #60 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2005, 10:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

Following up to sarah

I've never reacted to carrots or dill -- it's usually people who harvest
or otherwise work with the plants a lot who develop sensitivities.
Hogweed/Wild Parsnip are unusual in the degree and speed of reaction.


all parsnips of course.
I often get umbillifer sap on me on the allotment I should think,
ive had no problem with carrots etc, but then I havent with
parsnip, but then you harvest them in winter. Perhaps i'm
roboallotmenter?
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap


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