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Old 07-12-2005, 03:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
kevnbro
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)

Regardless of how you like your chili- (beans, no beans, beef, pork,
mixed, chunked, ground) with a million chili recipes out there, the
difference between good chili and great chili is the seasoning and the
main seasoning in chili is chili powder.
I've made many pots of chili using commercial chili powder and been
quite happy with the end results but the last pot o' chili I made
contained homemade chili powder and I have to say, "I will never buy
another bag, bottle, pouch, sack, tin or box of commercial chili powder
for my chili".
Inspired by Cook's Illustrated, I took their advice and purchased
dried Ancho chili's and dried New Mexico chili's (found in many
stores), put them on a cookie sheet and using low oven heat, slow
roasted them until they were brittle enough to grind to a powder in a
spice grinder (I use a Braun coffee/spice grinder).
Using the homemade powder gave my chili a deep, dark extremely
flavorful chili base that cannot be duplicated using commercial chili
powder. Combine that with whole roasted cumin seed that is also ground,
and you've the beginnings of not a good chili... but a great chili.

So get out there an get chili!!


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Old 07-12-2005, 04:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Cam
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)


kevnbro wrote:
Regardless of how you like your chili- (beans, no beans, beef, pork,
mixed, chunked, ground) with a million chili recipes out there, the
difference between good chili and great chili is the seasoning and the
main seasoning in chili is chili powder.


How about a can of chipotles and a tablespoon of garam masala?

Cam

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Old 07-12-2005, 04:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
kevnbro
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)

Of course! Chipotles w/adobo make a great addition to chili as i'm
sure garam masala would... just depends on the flavor your after.

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Old 10-12-2005, 12:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
ensenadajim
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)

On 7 Dec 2005 07:59:25 -0800, "kevnbro" wrote:

Regardless of how you like your chili- (beans, no beans, beef, pork,
mixed, chunked, ground) with a million chili recipes out there, the
difference between good chili and great chili is the seasoning and the
main seasoning in chili is chili powder.
I've made many pots of chili using commercial chili powder and been
quite happy with the end results but the last pot o' chili I made
contained homemade chili powder and I have to say, "I will never buy
another bag, bottle, pouch, sack, tin or box of commercial chili powder
for my chili".
Inspired by Cook's Illustrated, I took their advice and purchased
dried Ancho chili's and dried New Mexico chili's (found in many
stores), put them on a cookie sheet and using low oven heat, slow
roasted them until they were brittle enough to grind to a powder in a
spice grinder (I use a Braun coffee/spice grinder).
Using the homemade powder gave my chili a deep, dark extremely
flavorful chili base that cannot be duplicated using commercial chili
powder. Combine that with whole roasted cumin seed that is also ground,
and you've the beginnings of not a good chili... but a great chili.

So get out there an get chili!!


So, can you post the recipe?


jim

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Old 10-12-2005, 07:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Mark Shaw
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)

ensenadajim wrote:
On 7 Dec 2005 07:59:25 -0800, "kevnbro" wrote:


Inspired by Cook's Illustrated, I took their advice and purchased
dried Ancho chili's and dried New Mexico chili's (found in many
stores), put them on a cookie sheet and using low oven heat, slow
roasted them until they were brittle enough to grind to a powder in a
spice grinder (I use a Braun coffee/spice grinder).
Using the homemade powder gave my chili a deep, dark extremely
flavorful chili base that cannot be duplicated using commercial chili
powder. Combine that with whole roasted cumin seed that is also ground,
and you've the beginnings of not a good chili... but a great chili.


So, can you post the recipe?


Here's one I've been meaning to try....

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci..._28230,00.html

--
Mark Shaw
================================================== ======================
"The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny....'" - Isaac Asimov


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Old 10-12-2005, 08:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Bob Terwilliger
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)

Jim replied to kevnbro

Inspired by Cook's Illustrated, I took their advice and purchased
dried Ancho chili's and dried New Mexico chili's (found in many
stores), put them on a cookie sheet and using low oven heat, slow
roasted them until they were brittle enough to grind to a powder in a
spice grinder (I use a Braun coffee/spice grinder).
Using the homemade powder gave my chili a deep, dark extremely
flavorful chili base that cannot be duplicated using commercial chili
powder. Combine that with whole roasted cumin seed that is also ground,
and you've the beginnings of not a good chili... but a great chili.

So get out there an get chili!!


So, can you post the recipe?


Here's the Cook's Illustrated recipe, and it *is* very good:

Cooks Illustrated Chili con Carne

3 tablespoons ancho chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 1/2 ounce), toasted
and ground
3 tablespoons New Mexico chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 3/4 ounce),
toasted and ground
2 tablespoons cumin seeds, toasted in a dry skillet over medium heat until
fragrant, about 4 minutes, and ground
2 teaspoons dried oregano, preferably Mexican
1/2 cup water
1 4-pound beef chuck roast, trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1-inch cubes
2 teaspoons salt, plus extra for seasoning
8 ounces bacon (7 or 8 slices), cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1 medium onion, minced (about 1 cup)
5 medium garlic cloves, minced
4-5 small jalapeño chile peppers, cored, seeded, and minced
1 cup canned crushed tomatoes or plain tomato sauce
2 tablespoons juice from 1 medium lime
5 tablespoons masa harina or 3 tablespoons cornstarch
Ground black pepper

1. Mix chili powders, cumin, and oregano in small bowl and stir in 1/2 cup
water to form thick paste; set aside. Toss beef cubes with salt; set aside.

2. Fry bacon in large, heavy soup kettle or Dutch oven over medium-low heat
until fat renders and bacon crisps, about 10 minutes. Remove bacon with
slotted spoon to paper towel-lined plate, pour all but 2 teaspoons fat from
pot into small bowl; set aside. Increase heat to medium-high; sauté meat in
four batches until well-browned on all sides, about 5 minutes per batch,
adding additional 2 teaspoons bacon fat to pot as necessary. Reduce heat to
medium, add 3 tablespoons bacon fat to now-empty pan. Add onion; sauté until
softened, 5 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and jalapeño; sauté until fragrant,
about 1 minute. Add chili paste; sauté until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add
reserved bacon and browned beef, crushed tomatoes or tomato sauce, lime
juice, and 7 cups water; bring to simmer. Continue to cook at a steady
simmer until meat is tender and juices are dark, rich, and starting to
thicken, about 2 hours.

3. Mix masa harina with 2/3 cup water (or cornstarch with 3 tablespoons
water) in a small bowl to form smooth paste. Increase heat to medium; stir
in paste and simmer until thickened, 5 to 10 minutes. Adjust seasoning
generously with salt and ground black pepper. Serve immediately, or
preferably, cool slightly, cover, and refrigerate overnight or for up to 5
days. Reheat before serving.


SMOKY CHIPOTLE CHILI CON CARNE SERVES 6

Grill-smoking the meat, a technique from food writers John and Matt Lewis
Thorne, authors of the Serious Pig, in combination with chipotle chiles give
this chili a distinct but not overwhelming smoky flavor. Make sure you
start with a chuck roast that is at least three inches thick. The grilling
is meant to flavor the meat by searing the surface and smoking it lightly,
not to cook it.

1. To prepare meat: Puree 4 medium garlic cloves with two teaspoons salt.
Rub intact chuck roast with puree, and sprinkle evenly with 2 to 3
tablespoons New Mexico chili powder; cover and set aside. Meanwhile, build
a hot fire. When you can hold your hand 5 inches above the grill for no
more than 3 seconds, spread hot coals to area about the size of the roast.
Open bottom grill vents, scatter one cup soaked mesquite or hickory wood
chips over hot coals, and set grill rack in place. Grill roast over hot
coals, opening lid vents three-quarters of the way and covering so that
vents are opposite bottom vents to draw smoke through and around roast.
Sear meat until all sides are dark and richly colored, about 12 minutes per
side. Remove roast to bowl; when cool to the touch, trim and cut into
1-inch cubes, reserving juices.

2. For the chili: Follow recipe for chili con carne, omitting the browning
of meat cubes and substituting 5 minced canned chipotle peppers in adobo
sauce for jalapeños.


To ensure the best chili flavor, I recommend toasting whole dried chiles and
grinding them in a mini-chopper or spice-dedicated coffee grinder. For
hotter chili boost the heat with a pinch of cayenne, a dash of hot pepper
sauce, or crumbled pequin chiles near the end of cooking. Serve the chili
with any of the following side dishes: warm pinto or kidney beans, corn
bread or chips, corn tortillas or tamales, rice, biscuits, or just plain
crackers, and top with any of the following garnishes: chopped fresh
cilantro leaves, minced white onion, diced avocado, shredded cheddar or jack
cheese, or sour cream.


Bob


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Old 10-12-2005, 10:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
ensenadajim
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)


Here's Pepper Fool's Chili Powder #1
http://www.pepperfool.com/recipes/ch...i_powder1.html

Chili Powder #1

# 6 dried New Mexico hot peppers
# 6 dried Chipotle peppers
# 3 Pasilla Negro peppers
# 2 Mulato peppers
# 6 tablespoons cumin seed
# 6 tablespoons coriander seed
# 1 tablespoon whole cloves
# 3 tablespoons celery seed
# 2 tablespoons ground Cayenne

1. Break up the New Mexico, chipotle, and mulato chiles. Toast the
chiles in small batches on an ungreased skillet, or comal over medium
heat until they just begin to release their aroma. Do not let them
darken or the may become bitter.
2. Toast the cumin, coriander, and cloves on an ungreased skillet, or
comal over low heat until they release their fragrance and become
lightly roasted, about three minutes.
3. Grind the toasted spices and celery seed (best to use a spice
grinder).
4. Grind the chiles in a spice grinder or food processor.
5. Mix the ground chiles, spices, and ground cayenne. This receipe is
an adaptation of one appearing in "New Southwestern Cooking" by Dille
& Belsinger. Since I never have the chiles called for in the receipe,
I invariably "wing it." The spices seem to be the important factor so
substituting different chiles doesn't make a major difference in the
finished product.

From: Glen Hosey's Recipe Collection Program,
Posted By: Judy Howle
Flavors of the South, Recipes for "heat lovers"
Post Date: Wed, 29 Apr 1998


jim

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Old 10-12-2005, 11:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
djs0302
 
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Default 'Tis the Chili Season! (Literally)


Bob Terwilliger wrote:
Jim replied to kevnbro

Inspired by Cook's Illustrated, I took their advice and purchased
dried Ancho chili's and dried New Mexico chili's (found in many
stores), put them on a cookie sheet and using low oven heat, slow
roasted them until they were brittle enough to grind to a powder in a
spice grinder (I use a Braun coffee/spice grinder).
Using the homemade powder gave my chili a deep, dark extremely
flavorful chili base that cannot be duplicated using commercial chili
powder. Combine that with whole roasted cumin seed that is also ground,
and you've the beginnings of not a good chili... but a great chili.

So get out there an get chili!!


So, can you post the recipe?


Here's the Cook's Illustrated recipe, and it *is* very good:

Cooks Illustrated Chili con Carne

3 tablespoons ancho chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 1/2 ounce), toasted
and ground
3 tablespoons New Mexico chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 3/4 ounce),
toasted and ground
2 tablespoons cumin seeds, toasted in a dry skillet over medium heat until
fragrant, about 4 minutes, and ground
2 teaspoons dried oregano, preferably Mexican
1/2 cup water
1 4-pound beef chuck roast, trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1-inch cubes
2 teaspoons salt, plus extra for seasoning
8 ounces bacon (7 or 8 slices), cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1 medium onion, minced (about 1 cup)
5 medium garlic cloves, minced
4-5 small jalapeño chile peppers, cored, seeded, and minced
1 cup canned crushed tomatoes or plain tomato sauce
2 tablespoons juice from 1 medium lime
5 tablespoons masa harina or 3 tablespoons cornstarch
Ground black pepper

1. Mix chili powders, cumin, and oregano in small bowl and stir in 1/2 cup
water to form thick paste; set aside. Toss beef cubes with salt; set aside.

2. Fry bacon in large, heavy soup kettle or Dutch oven over medium-low heat
until fat renders and bacon crisps, about 10 minutes. Remove bacon with
slotted spoon to paper towel-lined plate, pour all but 2 teaspoons fat from
pot into small bowl; set aside. Increase heat to medium-high; sauté meat in
four batches until well-browned on all sides, about 5 minutes per batch,
adding additional 2 teaspoons bacon fat to pot as necessary. Reduce heat to
medium, add 3 tablespoons bacon fat to now-empty pan. Add onion; sauté until
softened, 5 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and jalapeño; sauté until fragrant,
about 1 minute. Add chili paste; sauté until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add
reserved bacon and browned beef, crushed tomatoes or tomato sauce, lime
juice, and 7 cups water; bring to simmer. Continue to cook at a steady
simmer until meat is tender and juices are dark, rich, and starting to
thicken, about 2 hours.

3. Mix masa harina with 2/3 cup water (or cornstarch with 3 tablespoons
water) in a small bowl to form smooth paste. Increase heat to medium; stir
in paste and simmer until thickened, 5 to 10 minutes. Adjust seasoning
generously with salt and ground black pepper. Serve immediately, or
preferably, cool slightly, cover, and refrigerate overnight or for up to 5
days. Reheat before serving.


SMOKY CHIPOTLE CHILI CON CARNE SERVES 6

Grill-smoking the meat, a technique from food writers John and Matt Lewis
Thorne, authors of the Serious Pig, in combination with chipotle chiles give
this chili a distinct but not overwhelming smoky flavor. Make sure you
start with a chuck roast that is at least three inches thick. The grilling
is meant to flavor the meat by searing the surface and smoking it lightly,
not to cook it.

1. To prepare meat: Puree 4 medium garlic cloves with two teaspoons salt.
Rub intact chuck roast with puree, and sprinkle evenly with 2 to 3
tablespoons New Mexico chili powder; cover and set aside. Meanwhile, build
a hot fire. When you can hold your hand 5 inches above the grill for no
more than 3 seconds, spread hot coals to area about the size of the roast.
Open bottom grill vents, scatter one cup soaked mesquite or hickory wood
chips over hot coals, and set grill rack in place. Grill roast over hot
coals, opening lid vents three-quarters of the way and covering so that
vents are opposite bottom vents to draw smoke through and around roast.
Sear meat until all sides are dark and richly colored, about 12 minutes per
side. Remove roast to bowl; when cool to the touch, trim and cut into
1-inch cubes, reserving juices.

2. For the chili: Follow recipe for chili con carne, omitting the browning
of meat cubes and substituting 5 minced canned chipotle peppers in adobo
sauce for jalapeños.


To ensure the best chili flavor, I recommend toasting whole dried chiles and
grinding them in a mini-chopper or spice-dedicated coffee grinder. For
hotter chili boost the heat with a pinch of cayenne, a dash of hot pepper
sauce, or crumbled pequin chiles near the end of cooking. Serve the chili
with any of the following side dishes: warm pinto or kidney beans, corn
bread or chips, corn tortillas or tamales, rice, biscuits, or just plain
crackers, and top with any of the following garnishes: chopped fresh
cilantro leaves, minced white onion, diced avocado, shredded cheddar or jack
cheese, or sour cream.


Bob


WHAT? No spaghetti? I always put a little spaghetti in chili.



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