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Old 27-11-2005, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
sf
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?


http://www.themenupage.com/zingarimenu.html

Petto Di Pollo Con Melanzane E Groviera
Sauteed Chicken Breast with Garlic and White Wine
topped with Eggplant & Groviera Cheese

TIA
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.

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Old 27-11-2005, 05:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

I'm guessing that it is a typo and that they mean Graviera cheese. Once
you have the spelling correct, you can find descriptions all over:


http://www.cheese.com/Description.asp?Name=Graviera


--Lia


sf wrote:
http://www.themenupage.com/zingarimenu.html

Petto Di Pollo Con Melanzane E Groviera
Sauteed Chicken Breast with Garlic and White Wine
topped with Eggplant & Groviera Cheese

TIA
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


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Old 27-11-2005, 05:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Michel Boucher
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Julia Altshuler wrote in
:

http://www.cheese.com/Description.asp?Name=Graviera


Good source! Thanks for the link. I notice however that it is
incomplete in that it does not have Velveeta :-)

P.S.: Before anyone gets their knickers in a twist, let me say that I
actually like Velveeta and buy some to eat from time to time. After
all, when I buy Velveeta (or any erroneously named "American" cheese) I
buy the result of Candian invention. Sort of like the French buying a
Chardonnay from the Napa valley. Kinky, but who knows eh? :-)

--

"Compassion is the chief law of human existence."

Dostoevski, The Idiot
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Old 27-11-2005, 06:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
jake
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

sf wrote:

http://www.themenupage.com/zingarimenu.html

Petto Di Pollo Con Melanzane E Groviera
Sauteed Chicken Breast with Garlic and White Wine
topped with Eggplant & Groviera Cheese

TIA
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


Is there any chance it might be related to Gruyere?
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Old 27-11-2005, 07:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Pandora
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?


"sf" ha scritto nel messaggio
news

http://www.themenupage.com/zingarimenu.html

Petto Di Pollo Con Melanzane E Groviera
Sauteed Chicken Breast with Garlic and White Wine
topped with Eggplant & Groviera Cheese

Beautiful restaurant but...shall I correct all the wrong words in italian
Cheers
Pandora

TIA
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.





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Old 27-11-2005, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Nathalie Chiva
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 07:47:36 -0800, sf
wrote:


http://www.themenupage.com/zingarimenu.html

Petto Di Pollo Con Melanzane E Groviera
Sauteed Chicken Breast with Garlic and White Wine
topped with Eggplant & Groviera Cheese


Groviera is the italisan translation of Gruyère.

Nathalie in Switzerland

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Old 27-11-2005, 11:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Nathalie Chiva wrote:

Groviera is the italisan translation of Gruyère.




This makes more sense on an Italian restaurant menu than my guess that
it was the misspelling of a Greek cheese.


I went back to have a look at which would make more sense from a
flavor/texture point of view, and I can't decide. The Gruyere would be
creamier texture, more meltable which might make more sense for a leek
soup where the Graviera would be more of grating cheese which would
still work for the soup. The Gruyere would be a stronger, nuttier
flavor (provided the restaurant owners were able to get a good one--
they vary mightily) where the Graviera would be milder and could still
bring out the flavors of the leeks very nicely.


O.K., here's my new theory: the menu makers couldn't decide between
Italian Gruyere and Greek Graviera so they purposely made it ambiguous.
That way they could serve either one on a given day depending on their
mood and what was available at the market.


--Lia

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Old 27-11-2005, 11:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

http://www.cheese.com/Description.asp?Name=Graviera


Nice link and very interesting. The vegetarian cheeses were more than
plentiful which surprised me. Would a vegan eat those cheeses?



Knowing what I know about vegans, that wouldn't surprise me.

--Lia

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Old 27-11-2005, 11:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

I know, there was a huge assortment. Like 20 of them all made from sheeps
milk. Does the sheep's milk make it vegan or am I completely misreading
the thing?



Now I understand your question better.


Normally, vegetarian means someone who does NOT eat meat, poultry, fish
or shellfish. Vegetarians normally DO eat grains, beans, nuts,
vegetables, fruit, milk and eggs.


Normally, vegan means someone who does NOT eat meat, poultry, fish,
shellfish, eggs or milk. Vegans normally DO eat grains, beans, nuts,
vegetables, and fruit.


The problem is that a great many people who call themselves vegetarians
and vegans bend the definitions such that they eat whatever they want
and confound the well-meaning people who are trying to serve them
something that fits their diet. You run into vegans who are sure that
white sugar isn't a vegan food, and I've told the story of the lady who
went on and on about how she'd been vegetarian for 20 years, accepted my
admiration and compliments, then later in the conversation revealed that
she ate turkey on Thanksgiving and other poultry the rest of the time.
She probably thought KFC was a vegetarian restaurant.


What's meant by vegetarian cheese? It should mean that the rennet
(coagulating agent) comes from a non-animal source. The oldest cheeses
use a rennet that's made from some intestinal source of the animal. I'm
not sure of the exact science here, but the rennet is such a small
amount, practically microscopic, that lots of vegetarians wouldn't
consider it meat, but others would. A vegetarian cheese uses a
different rennet. Again, I'm not sure of the chemistry part of the lesson.


Vegan cheese is another question altogether. Since vegans don't eat
milk, it should mean some sort of cheese-like substance made from tofu
or beans or something that's not milk. But I like to make fun of vegans
on this list so I suggest that there are people out there who proclaim
themselves to be vegans, then go out and eat cheese made from regular
milk. We've got a customer like that in the wine and cheese shop, but
that's not the craziest thing about her. I'd be glad if it were.


--Lia

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Old 28-11-2005, 12:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
sf
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 22:44:09 +0100, Nathalie Chiva wrote:

On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 07:47:36 -0800, sf
wrote:


http://www.themenupage.com/zingarimenu.html

Petto Di Pollo Con Melanzane E Groviera
Sauteed Chicken Breast with Garlic and White Wine
topped with Eggplant & Groviera Cheese


Groviera is the italisan translation of Gruyère.

Nathalie in Switzerland


thanks!
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


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Old 28-11-2005, 12:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Michel Boucher
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Julia Altshuler wrote in
:

Normally, vegan means someone who does NOT eat meat, poultry,
fish, shellfish, eggs or milk. Vegans normally DO eat grains,
beans, nuts, vegetables, and fruit.


Then there are fruitarians who only eat previously "dead" vegetables.
There was a very funny bit about that in the movie Notting Hill.

--

"Compassion is the chief law of human existence."

Dostoevski, The Idiot
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Old 28-11-2005, 12:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Arri London
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?



Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan wrote:

Julia Altshuler looking for trouble wrote in
:

I'm guessing that it is a typo and that they mean Graviera cheese. Once
you have the spelling correct, you can find descriptions all over:


http://www.cheese.com/Description.asp?Name=Graviera


--Lia


Nice link and very interesting. The vegetarian cheeses were more than
plentiful which surprised me. Would a vegan eat those cheeses?

Michael


If they are made from milk of any sort, a true vegan wouldn't eat them.
But many vegans seem to be 'I'm vegan except when it comes to ...'

--
...Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
final say on what is, or is not, posted.
Send email to dog30 at charter dot net

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Old 28-11-2005, 05:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

What an absolutely fabulous explanation. I do a low fat regime myself and
your explanation will help me enormously. Vegetarian is so different.



blush Aw, thanks for the compliment. If you explain that you're on a
low-fat regime, that should do it.


A vegetarian meal can be high or low fat. Cream, butter and eggs are
vegetarian and high fat (assuming you're eating a lot of them). Lean
beef and chicken broth are not vegetarian and low fat.


--Lia

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Old 28-11-2005, 06:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
gkm
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

Julia Altshuler wrote:
Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

What an absolutely fabulous explanation. I do a low fat regime myself
and your explanation will help me enormously. Vegetarian is so
different.




blush Aw, thanks for the compliment. If you explain that you're on a
low-fat regime, that should do it.


A vegetarian meal can be high or low fat. Cream, butter and eggs are
vegetarian and high fat (assuming you're eating a lot of them). Lean
beef and chicken broth are not vegetarian and low fat.


--Lia


Having inlaws that are vegetarian from a traditional religious
background, I'd say eggs would be in the grey area.

But even the (almost centurion) grand-mother was quite amused on a
recent visit to the SF Bay area when a waitress lectured her (I'd say
berated) on vegetarianism. Her crime was asking asking for milk at a
vegetarian restaurant in the city.


--
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Old 28-11-2005, 06:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
serene
 
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Default what is Groviera Cheese ?

On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 22:16:54 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
wrote:

Julia Altshuler looking for trouble wrote in
:

Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

http://www.cheese.com/Description.asp?Name=Graviera


Nice link and very interesting. The vegetarian cheeses were more than
plentiful which surprised me. Would a vegan eat those cheeses?



Knowing what I know about vegans, that wouldn't surprise me.

--Lia


I know, there was a huge assortment. Like 20 of them all made from sheeps
milk. Does the sheep's milk make it vegan or am I completely misreading
the thing?


Things made from animals' milk are not vegan.

serene


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