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Old 19-11-2005, 10:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.

We had the Tom last week and it's still on sale. It was pretty good
after a short 1 hour brining. I used Alton Brown's 500% for the first
1/2 hour and the rest at 350.

What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?


Also, the same supermarket is selling choice Rib Roast (Middle Cut)
for $3.99 a pound. We were going to make brisket and turkey for
thanksgiving but we now we're thinking about Turkey and Rib Roast,
although brisket can be made the day before.

Anyway, what is the middle cut like?

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Old 19-11-2005, 06:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

alan wrote:
Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.

We had the Tom last week and it's still on sale. It was pretty good
after a short 1 hour brining. I used Alton Brown's 500% for the first
1/2 hour and the rest at 350.

What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?


Also, the same supermarket is selling choice Rib Roast (Middle Cut)
for $3.99 a pound. We were going to make brisket and turkey for
thanksgiving but we now we're thinking about Turkey and Rib Roast,
although brisket can be made the day before.

Anyway, what is the middle cut like?



I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.

Bob
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Old 19-11-2005, 07:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
itsjoannotjoann
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


zxcvbob wrote:
alan wrote:
Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.


What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?




I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.

Bob



No, a hen is actually a 'woman' turkey (I know, I know, what a stupid
thing to say) and of course that makes the toms male. Most all turks
sold in the store are toms because they do seem to have the larger
breast. Hen turkeys can be had at the grocery stores but you may have
to do a search at your market or request they order one for you.

I've had both and not being a con-o-sewer I couldn't really tell any
difference in the taste. Some say there is, but I couldn't distinguish
any.

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Old 19-11-2005, 07:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

itsjoannotjoann wrote:
zxcvbob wrote:

alan wrote:

Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.


What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?




I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.

Bob




No, a hen is actually a 'woman' turkey (I know, I know, what a stupid
thing to say) and of course that makes the toms male. Most all turks
sold in the store are toms because they do seem to have the larger
breast. Hen turkeys can be had at the grocery stores but you may have
to do a search at your market or request they order one for you.



I know /biologically/ that's the difference between toms and hens, but
when they are gutted and plucked and shrink-wrapped in plastic, I think
the wrapper says "tom" on the 20 pounders and "hen" on the 10 pounders,
and the actual sex of the once bird has nothing to do with it.

The males do tend to be larger, but I don't think they really sex them.

I've had both and not being a con-o-sewer I couldn't really tell any
difference in the taste. Some say there is, but I couldn't distinguish
any.



Best regards,
Bob
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Old 19-11-2005, 08:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
itsjoannotjoann
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


zxcvbob wrote:


I know /biologically/ that's the difference between toms and hens, but
when they are gutted and plucked and shrink-wrapped in plastic, I think
the wrapper says "tom" on the 20 pounders and "hen" on the 10 pounders,
and the actual sex of the once bird has nothing to do with it.

The males do tend to be larger, but I don't think they really sex them.



Best regards,
Bob



You could very well be right. All I know is I wouldn't want to have to
sex a turkey! snort



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Old 19-11-2005, 08:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


itsjoannotjoann wrote:
zxcvbob wrote:


I know /biologically/ that's the difference between toms and hens, but
when they are gutted and plucked and shrink-wrapped in plastic, I think
the wrapper says "tom" on the 20 pounders and "hen" on the 10 pounders,
and the actual sex of the once bird has nothing to do with it.

The males do tend to be larger, but I don't think they really sex them.



Best regards,
Bob



You could very well be right. All I know is I wouldn't want to have to
sex a turkey! snort


It's actually easier to sex a turkey than it is these days to sex
humans.
Make turkeys have all the fancy schmancy pumage.

Sheldon

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Old 19-11-2005, 08:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


zxcvbob wrote:
alan wrote:
Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.

We had the Tom last week and it's still on sale. It was pretty good
after a short 1 hour brining. I used Alton Brown's 500% for the first
1/2 hour and the rest at 350.

What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?


Also, the same supermarket is selling choice Rib Roast (Middle Cut)
for $3.99 a pound. We were going to make brisket and turkey for
thanksgiving but we now we're thinking about Turkey and Rib Roast,
although brisket can be made the day before.

Anyway, what is the middle cut like?



I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.


Actually the hens are indeed females, the toms are indeed males... and
it is very easy to tell the difference.... as easy as telling a rooster
from a hen with chickens

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.


Actually it's the opposite.... the heavier the bird the greater the
bone to meat ratio.

There is more meat, and more white meat, on two 12 pound hens than on
one 24 pound tom. Hens are moister and tastier, cook quicker, and are
easier to handle.... two hens cooked together will require the same
time as one hen. Hens being so much smaller will also defrost more
quickly. I recommend two hens rather than one large tom... you get
four wings and four drumsticks too. And even though hens may cost 10%
more they contain 10% more meat, and requiring less cooking time save
energy use too... no matter how you slice it hens are a better buy.

Sheldon

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Old 19-11-2005, 08:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

I wonder why the hens are 10 cents more a pound, unless there is just
less of a supply or with the Tom, you get a volume discount.

On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 13:33:02 -0600, zxcvbob
wrote:

itsjoannotjoann wrote:
zxcvbob wrote:

alan wrote:

Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.


What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?




I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.

Bob




No, a hen is actually a 'woman' turkey (I know, I know, what a stupid
thing to say) and of course that makes the toms male. Most all turks
sold in the store are toms because they do seem to have the larger
breast. Hen turkeys can be had at the grocery stores but you may have
to do a search at your market or request they order one for you.



I know /biologically/ that's the difference between toms and hens, but
when they are gutted and plucked and shrink-wrapped in plastic, I think
the wrapper says "tom" on the 20 pounders and "hen" on the 10 pounders,
and the actual sex of the once bird has nothing to do with it.

The males do tend to be larger, but I don't think they really sex them.

I've had both and not being a con-o-sewer I couldn't really tell any
difference in the taste. Some say there is, but I couldn't distinguish
any.



Best regards,
Bob

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Old 19-11-2005, 08:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

Joan,

I used to think females had larger breasts than males but I guess it
depends on who you hang out with. It's a good think to know for
reincarnation.

alan

On 19 Nov 2005 11:21:05 -0800, "itsjoannotjoann"
wrote:


zxcvbob wrote:
alan wrote:
Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.


What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?




I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.

Bob



No, a hen is actually a 'woman' turkey (I know, I know, what a stupid
thing to say) and of course that makes the toms male. Most all turks
sold in the store are toms because they do seem to have the larger
breast. Hen turkeys can be had at the grocery stores but you may have
to do a search at your market or request they order one for you.

I've had both and not being a con-o-sewer I couldn't really tell any
difference in the taste. Some say there is, but I couldn't distinguish
any.

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Old 19-11-2005, 09:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
itsjoannotjoann
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


alan wrote:
Joan,

I used to think females had larger breasts than males but I guess it
depends on who you hang out with. It's a good think to know for
reincarnation.

alan

I'm not touching that with a ten foot pole!



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Old 19-11-2005, 09:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

itsjoannotjoann wrote:

I may be wrong, but I think the birds are sorted by size rather than
sex. A "hen" is smaller than a "tom", and either be male or female.

The heavier the bird, the more meat you get per pound.


No, a hen is actually a 'woman' turkey (I know, I know, what a stupid
thing to say) and of course that makes the toms male. Most all turks
sold in the store are toms because they do seem to have the larger
breast. Hen turkeys can be had at the grocery stores but you may have
to do a search at your market or request they order one for you.

I've had both and not being a con-o-sewer I couldn't really tell any
difference in the taste. Some say there is, but I couldn't distinguish
any.


When all else fails, Google is you friend. From the University of Illinois
Turkey for the Holiday page:

A Hen or A Tom Turkey

Most experts agree that a hen turkey is a better buy than a tom. Hens are
generally weigh less than 16 pounds and a tom turkey is usually over 16
pounds. Toms are larger with larger bones and less edible portions. However,
age not gender is the determining factor where tenderness is concerned.

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Old 20-11-2005, 01:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Elaine Parrish
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


On Sat, 19 Nov 2005, alan wrote:

Waldbaums, our supermarket, has turkeys in sale if you spend $25. The
Toms are 29 cents a pound and the Hens are 39 cents. Price wars are
great!.

We had the Tom last week and it's still on sale. It was pretty good
after a short 1 hour brining. I used Alton Brown's 500% for the first
1/2 hour and the rest at 350.

What is the difference in taste between a Tom and a Hen and is there
any difference in the size of the breast in the Hen?


Also, the same supermarket is selling choice Rib Roast (Middle Cut)
for $3.99 a pound. We were going to make brisket and turkey for
thanksgiving but we now we're thinking about Turkey and Rib Roast,
although brisket can be made the day before.

Anyway, what is the middle cut like?



Most of the Thanksgiving turkeys are young Toms. The reason being that
female turkeys are kept for breeding. One Tom can service a flock of
hens, so Toms get the axe. The same is true for most of the meats we eat.

If the turkeys are the same age, then there should not be a lot of
difference. The Toms will probably be bigger for their age and have more
meat on their bones. Hens, generally, have a higher fat ratio. If there is
an age difference (young tom, old hen) the hen will be tougher and
more stringy.

There are less hens available, so, often, they are priced higher.
When hens are on the market, it can be because there was a bumper crop of
hens or older, non-laying, or no-longer-laying hens are being culled from
the crop.

Elaine, too


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Old 20-11-2005, 01:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Elaine Parrish
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen




On Sat, 19 Nov 2005, alan wrote:

Joan,

I used to think females had larger breasts than males but I guess it
depends on who you hang out with. It's a good think to know for
reincarnation.

alan



That's only in mammals! wink

Elaine, too



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Old 20-11-2005, 01:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen

Elaine Parrish wrote:

If the turkeys are the same age, then there should not be a lot of
difference. The Toms will probably be bigger for their age and have more
meat on their bones. Hens, generally, have a higher fat ratio. If there is
an age difference (young tom, old hen) the hen will be tougher and
more stringy.


Especially if they are married :-)



There are less hens available, so, often, they are priced higher.
When hens are on the market, it can be because there was a bumper crop of
hens or older, non-laying, or no-longer-laying hens are being culled from
the crop.


Turkeys tend to produce about three times as many hens as toms.

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Old 20-11-2005, 02:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey: Tom or Hen


Dave Smith wrote:

Turkeys tend to produce about three times as many hens as toms.


Naturally you can offer better proof than imbecilic Elaine.

Actually with avians the percentage of male to female production in the
wild is darn close to 1 : 1. There is much info on the net regarding
this topic. With domestic birds for food production, such as turkeys,
farmers have tried to manipulate the sex ratio with temperature and
hormones but to no avail, the population stays darn close to 1 : 1.

Also, large turkey farmers that raise turkey for consumption either buy
their chicks (poults) or incubate eggs but typically do not produce
eggs, instead they purchase fertile eggs from farmers who just breed.
They definitely do not wish to lose any so turkey farmers who proudce
marketable turkey refrain from attempts at artificial population
manipulation... I mean they can kill off a certain percentage of poults
as soon as they can be sexed. duh Hens mature for market at about 15
weeks, toms at about 20 weeks. Production of both sexes is very close
to equal.

If you search turkey raising you will be amazed at what's available.

Btw, did you know that turkeys possess a significantly higher IQ than
Elaine

I have wild turkeys living on my property (100s), I can confirm that
the mix of males to females is purty darn equal. But, not all males
actually mate. The related males (those of the same mother) will work
as a team to round up the females but only the dominant male gets to
mate while his brothers stand guard to keep other males away and to
cheer their brother on... only the toms can make the gobble sound,
which can be heard for a mile. Don't believe, look it up, every word
is true.

Sheldon



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