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Old 11-11-2005, 02:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Peter Huebner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?


In an earlier life I was working as adult ed consultant at a school that
was teaching German to Vietnamese boat people - and as a direct result I
got invited to quite a lot of Vietnamese banquets. Which I really
enjoyed, and I got quite a few hints and tips on how to prepare some of
the dishes.

There are a couple of issues, however, where my memory fails. One thing
is the [pastry] for lack of a better word. A lot of dishes were similar
to spring rolls, but they were things bundled in a white
pastry/pasta/whatever and then boiled or steamed rather than deep fried.
Grab with chopsticks, dunk in fish sauce and eat. Delicious. But I
cannot for the life of me remember how to make that coating. Rice flour
and hot water is what has stuck but I am at a loss as to method ?!?

The other thing I am wondering about is the fish sauce. I remember it as
quite different from Thai fish sauce which is the only I have been able
to obtain here in NZ so far. Are they really different, or is my memory
playing tricks on me?

If anyone has a good link on how-tos I'd appreciate it. I think I can
remember well enough what it should taste like to be able to experiment
successfully with a few memory refreshers.

cheers, -Peter

--
=========================================
firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com

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Old 11-11-2005, 08:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Dan Abel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?

In article ,
Peter Huebner wrote:


There are a couple of issues, however, where my memory fails. One thing
is the [pastry] for lack of a better word. A lot of dishes were similar
to spring rolls, but they were things bundled in a white
pastry/pasta/whatever and then boiled or steamed rather than deep fried.
Grab with chopsticks, dunk in fish sauce and eat. Delicious. But I
cannot for the life of me remember how to make that coating. Rice flour
and hot water is what has stuck but I am at a loss as to method ?!?



Rice wrappers. I've never met anyone who made them, you buy them at the
store.


The other thing I am wondering about is the fish sauce. I remember it as
quite different from Thai fish sauce which is the only I have been able
to obtain here in NZ so far. Are they really different, or is my memory
playing tricks on me?



For me, a little fish sauce goes a long ways. I usually ask that it be
omitted. When I get those rolls I ask for peanut sauce instead. Fish
sauce is on the table, in little pots.

We have a nice place a few blocks from our house. At first they were
really cheap but I left hungry. I think you were supposed to order
multiple dishes. Over the years the prices have gone up, along with the
portion size.

--
Dan Abel

Petaluma, California, USA
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Old 11-11-2005, 08:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
dwn
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?

I would enjoy a bowl of pho and a caf su da right now...

Also, Siracha sauce is now a staple in my house -- right next to the
ketchup.


--
Jessica Alba NAKED
http://sheendigital.com/alba/



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Old 12-11-2005, 12:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
rmg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?


"Peter Huebner" wrote in message
t...

The other thing I am wondering about is the fish sauce. I remember it as
quite different from Thai fish sauce which is the only I have been able
to obtain here in NZ so far. Are they really different, or is my memory
playing tricks on me?

If anyone has a good link on how-tos I'd appreciate it. I think I can
remember well enough what it should taste like to be able to experiment
successfully with a few memory refreshers.


Authentic Vietnamese Cooking - by Corinne Trang

That resource is a great one. The recipes are classic, simple and
straightforward.

Regarding fish sauce, I consider it essential to the seasoning in certain
dishes. There are a wide variety of fish sauces, from cheap-o to good
quality. Research a good quality fish sauce and it shouldn't overpower your
other ingredients. Have fun.

cheers,

rox


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Old 12-11-2005, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
limey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?


"Peter Huebner" wrote in message
t...

In an earlier life I was working as adult ed consultant at a school that
was teaching German to Vietnamese boat people - and as a direct result I
got invited to quite a lot of Vietnamese banquets. Which I really
enjoyed, and I got quite a few hints and tips on how to prepare some of
the dishes.

There are a couple of issues, however, where my memory fails. One thing
is the [pastry] for lack of a better word. A lot of dishes were similar
to spring rolls, but they were things bundled in a white
pastry/pasta/whatever and then boiled or steamed rather than deep fried.
Grab with chopsticks, dunk in fish sauce and eat. Delicious. But I
cannot for the life of me remember how to make that coating. Rice flour
and hot water is what has stuck but I am at a loss as to method ?!?

The other thing I am wondering about is the fish sauce. I remember it as
quite different from Thai fish sauce which is the only I have been able
to obtain here in NZ so far. Are they really different, or is my memory
playing tricks on me?

If anyone has a good link on how-tos I'd appreciate it. I think I can
remember well enough what it should taste like to be able to experiment
successfully with a few memory refreshers.

cheers, -Peter


Would this help, do you think? -

http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/...cgi?vietnamese

Dora




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Old 12-11-2005, 01:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Clay Irving
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?

On 2005-11-12, limey wrote:

"Peter Huebner" wrote in message
t...


In an earlier life I was working as adult ed consultant at a school that
was teaching German to Vietnamese boat people - and as a direct result I
got invited to quite a lot of Vietnamese banquets. Which I really
enjoyed, and I got quite a few hints and tips on how to prepare some of
the dishes.

There are a couple of issues, however, where my memory fails. One thing
is the [pastry] for lack of a better word. A lot of dishes were similar
to spring rolls, but they were things bundled in a white
pastry/pasta/whatever and then boiled or steamed rather than deep fried.
Grab with chopsticks, dunk in fish sauce and eat. Delicious. But I
cannot for the life of me remember how to make that coating. Rice flour
and hot water is what has stuck but I am at a loss as to method ?!?

The other thing I am wondering about is the fish sauce. I remember it as
quite different from Thai fish sauce which is the only I have been able
to obtain here in NZ so far. Are they really different, or is my memory
playing tricks on me?

If anyone has a good link on how-tos I'd appreciate it. I think I can
remember well enough what it should taste like to be able to experiment
successfully with a few memory refreshers.

cheers, -Peter


Would this help, do you think? -

http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/...cgi?vietnamese


And, for information about fish sauce:

http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/...cgi?fish-sauce

I also found this useful information about the difference between Thai
and Vietnamese fish sauce:

Also keep in mind that fish sauce is also used in Thai and Filipino
cooking, where it tends to be saltier and heavier in flavor. So, even
though Thailand produces most of the fish sauce sold in the U.S., you
need to make sure that the condiment you're buying is made in the
'Vietnamese' style. How to do this? Look for Vietnamese
lettering alongside the Thai script. Sometimes, the terms Phu Quoc
and Phan Thiet are included on the label to signal a connection with
these two famous fish sauce-producing areas in Vietnam. Fish sauce
from Vietnam now sometimes use "Hon Phu Quoc" or "Hon Phan Thiet" (see
image on left) to indicate that their product came from islands in
those regions; hon means islands, and communicates a more authentic
Viet condiment (versus a Thai product, which may not be clued in on
such linguistic subtleties).

http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/essentials.htm

--
Clay Irving
Maybe this world is another planet's Hell.
- Aldous Huxley
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Old 12-11-2005, 01:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
limey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vietnamese anyone?


"Clay Irving" wrote in message
limey wrote:

"Peter Huebner" wrote in message

In an earlier life I was working as adult ed consultant at a school that
was teaching German to Vietnamese boat people - and as a direct result I
got invited to quite a lot of Vietnamese banquets. Which I really
enjoyed, and I got quite a few hints and tips on how to prepare some of
the dishes.

There are a couple of issues, however, where my memory fails. One thing
is the [pastry] for lack of a better word. A lot of dishes were similar
to spring rolls, but they were things bundled in a white
pastry/pasta/whatever and then boiled or steamed rather than deep fried.
Grab with chopsticks, dunk in fish sauce and eat. Delicious. But I
cannot for the life of me remember how to make that coating. Rice flour
and hot water is what has stuck but I am at a loss as to method ?!?

The other thing I am wondering about is the fish sauce. I remember it as
quite different from Thai fish sauce which is the only I have been able
to obtain here in NZ so far. Are they really different, or is my memory
playing tricks on me?

If anyone has a good link on how-tos I'd appreciate it. I think I can
remember well enough what it should taste like to be able to experiment
successfully with a few memory refreshers.

cheers, -Peter


Would this help, do you think? -

http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/...cgi?vietnamese


And, for information about fish sauce:

http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/...cgi?fish-sauce

I also found this useful information about the difference between Thai
and Vietnamese fish sauce:

Also keep in mind that fish sauce is also used in Thai and Filipino
cooking, where it tends to be saltier and heavier in flavor. So, even
though Thailand produces most of the fish sauce sold in the U.S., you
need to make sure that the condiment you're buying is made in the
'Vietnamese' style. How to do this? Look for Vietnamese
lettering alongside the Thai script. Sometimes, the terms Phu Quoc
and Phan Thiet are included on the label to signal a connection with
these two famous fish sauce-producing areas in Vietnam. Fish sauce
from Vietnam now sometimes use "Hon Phu Quoc" or "Hon Phan Thiet" (see
image on left) to indicate that their product came from islands in
those regions; hon means islands, and communicates a more authentic
Viet condiment (versus a Thai product, which may not be clued in on
such linguistic subtleties).

http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/essentials.htm

--
Clay Irving


My goodness, you are Clay, of Clay's Kitchen? I have your web site in my
Favorites and on my Desktop, since a friend is from Peru and also I am
trying to learn Thai cooking! The link I just gave Peter Huebner was taken
from your web page.

It's a good site. Thank you.

Dora




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