General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2005, 12:08 PM
Jen
 
Posts: n/a
Default seasoning a wok

Why do woks need to be seasoned. How do you do it, and how often?

--
Jen



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2005, 12:45 PM
Dr Hfuhruhurr
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Jen wrote:
Why do woks need to be seasoned. How do you do it, and how often?


Seasoning a Wok effectively gives it a non-stick coating. A well
seasoned wok is easy to clean and maintain.

1. Rinse the wok in hot water with small amount of liquid detergent.

2. Scrub the exterior of the wok with a scouring pad.

3. Repeat the process on the inside of the wok, using a sponge
instead of a scouring pad.

4. Rinse the wok and dry thoroughly.

5. Place the wok on low-medium heat.

6. Pour approximately 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil into the wok.

7. Use a paper towel to rub the oil over the entire inside surface of
the wok.

8. Heat the wok for about 10 minutes.

9. Wipe off the oil with another paper towel. There will be black
residue on the towel.

10. Allow the wok to cool.

11. Repeat steps 6 through 9 until no black residue comes up on the
paper (about 3 times). The wok is now ready to use.

Tips:
Flat bottomed woks are better for electric ranges. Round bottomed woks
can reflect heat back on the heating element, damaging it.
It is important to thoroughly clean the wok to remove the
manufacturer's protective coating.
It is better not to purchase a non-stick carbon steel wok, as the high
heats required for Chinese cooking may damage the non-stick coating.
If you do purchase a non-stick wok, follow the seasoning and cleaning
instructions carefully, or you may damage the coating.
More How To's from your Guide To Chinese Cuisine

I can't remember where I got this info from but I refer to it just to
make sure my wok is tip top.

Doc

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2005, 01:12 PM
Jen
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dr Hfuhruhurr" wrote in message
ups.com...

Jen wrote:
Why do woks need to be seasoned. How do you do it, and how often?


Seasoning a Wok effectively gives it a non-stick coating. A well
seasoned wok is easy to clean and maintain.

1. Rinse the wok in hot water with small amount of liquid detergent.

2. Scrub the exterior of the wok with a scouring pad.

3. Repeat the process on the inside of the wok, using a sponge
instead of a scouring pad.

4. Rinse the wok and dry thoroughly.

5. Place the wok on low-medium heat.

6. Pour approximately 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil into the wok.

7. Use a paper towel to rub the oil over the entire inside surface of
the wok.

8. Heat the wok for about 10 minutes.

9. Wipe off the oil with another paper towel. There will be black
residue on the towel.

10. Allow the wok to cool.

11. Repeat steps 6 through 9 until no black residue comes up on the
paper (about 3 times). The wok is now ready to use.



How often do I need to do all this? Or is it just the once?

--
Jen


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2005, 03:12 PM
salgud
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Dr Hfuhruhurr wrote:
Jen wrote:
Why do woks need to be seasoned. How do you do it, and how often?


Seasoning a Wok effectively gives it a non-stick coating. A well
seasoned wok is easy to clean and maintain.

1. Rinse the wok in hot water with small amount of liquid detergent.

2. Scrub the exterior of the wok with a scouring pad.

3. Repeat the process on the inside of the wok, using a sponge
instead of a scouring pad.

4. Rinse the wok and dry thoroughly.

5. Place the wok on low-medium heat.

6. Pour approximately 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil into the wok.

7. Use a paper towel to rub the oil over the entire inside surface of
the wok.

8. Heat the wok for about 10 minutes.

9. Wipe off the oil with another paper towel. There will be black
residue on the towel.

10. Allow the wok to cool.

11. Repeat steps 6 through 9 until no black residue comes up on the
paper (about 3 times). The wok is now ready to use.

Tips:
Flat bottomed woks are better for electric ranges. Round bottomed woks
can reflect heat back on the heating element, damaging it.
It is important to thoroughly clean the wok to remove the
manufacturer's protective coating.
It is better not to purchase a non-stick carbon steel wok, as the high
heats required for Chinese cooking may damage the non-stick coating.
If you do purchase a non-stick wok, follow the seasoning and cleaning
instructions carefully, or you may damage the coating.
More How To's from your Guide To Chinese Cuisine

I can't remember where I got this info from but I refer to it just to
make sure my wok is tip top.

Doc


I've been seasoning my woks for over 30 years in an entirely different
way. I coat the inside with oil, leaving just a little in the bottom,
then heat them up until the oil just begins to smoke (in oven or on
range top), then back off the heat until they just stop smoking. Then
let them stay heated for about an hour. I make sure I keep the insides
of the wok oiled. Let it cool. Rinse it out. Never use soap to clean
it. Clean it with salt (kosher salt is a little more abrasive, but not
required) and dry it when done.
As for seasoning a non-stick wok, that's the most ridiculous idea I've
ever heard of. Just put some oil in it when you start to heat it. What
could oil possibly do in to a non-stick coating by being heated on it,
or left on it when it's cold? Absolutely nothing! It's non-porous!
That's why it's non-stick! It won't absorb food, which means it won't
absorb oil. Treat a non-stick wok like any other non-stick pan, unless
it makes you feel "authentic" somehow.

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2005, 03:53 PM
Dr Hfuhruhurr
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Jen wrote:
"Dr Hfuhruhurr" wrote in message
ups.com...

Jen wrote:
Why do woks need to be seasoned. How do you do it, and how often?


Seasoning a Wok effectively gives it a non-stick coating. A well
seasoned wok is easy to clean and maintain.

1. Rinse the wok in hot water with small amount of liquid detergent.

2. Scrub the exterior of the wok with a scouring pad.

3. Repeat the process on the inside of the wok, using a sponge
instead of a scouring pad.

4. Rinse the wok and dry thoroughly.

5. Place the wok on low-medium heat.

6. Pour approximately 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil into the wok.

7. Use a paper towel to rub the oil over the entire inside surface of
the wok.

8. Heat the wok for about 10 minutes.

9. Wipe off the oil with another paper towel. There will be black
residue on the towel.

10. Allow the wok to cool.

11. Repeat steps 6 through 9 until no black residue comes up on the
paper (about 3 times). The wok is now ready to use.



How often do I need to do all this? Or is it just the once?


If the 'season' appears to go off, and it loses it's 'non stick'
properties then re-do. It depends on how often you use it. Once I've
finished cooking, I clean it with just water and apply a light coating
of oil to store. keeps it OK for about 6 months or so.

Doc



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2005, 10:44 PM
Victor Sack
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jen wrote:

Why do woks need to be seasoned. How do you do it, and how often?


See section 5.1 of the rec.food.cooking FAQ.

http://vsack.homepage.t-online.de/rfc_faq.html

Victor


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is Old Bay Seasoning Hench General Cooking 36 28-03-2013 06:15 PM
Seasoning a Wok Kswck General Cooking 1 19-01-2009 11:23 PM
Seasoning Dick Adams[_2_] General Cooking 55 08-03-2007 04:59 PM
Wok Seasoning [email protected] Cooking Equipment 3 26-01-2005 01:56 PM
wok seasoning? Sticks General Cooking 5 26-05-2004 12:10 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:58 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017