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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 03:37 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Homemade vanilla ice cream?

Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.

If there are any old church ladies who know how to help me, I
appreciate it! If I need to buy an old hand cranking machine and take
an hour to prepare the mixture, I'm willing to do it.

Kevin


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Old 09-09-2005, 05:01 AM
skoonj
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste,
a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.

If there are any old church ladies who know how to help me, I
appreciate it! If I need to buy an old hand cranking machine and take
an hour to prepare the mixture, I'm willing to do it.

Kevin


Is it the taste that's lacking, or the texture? Even if it's the latter,
I still think it's your recipe, not your machine.

I have no idea what church lady ice cream tastes like. Did they use
vanilla beans (black specks)? Did you? Did they use eggs (was it white
or yellowish)?

You can try some different recipes. An eggless one would be the most
radical difference. (Here's a basic uncooked Philly-style one:
http://cake.allrecipes.com/AZ/VanillaIceCream.asp)

You're probably battling against nostalgia here, and that's a tough
battle to win.

-T


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Old 09-09-2005, 05:08 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu 08 Sep 2005 07:37:48p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.


Yep, you're right. Ice cream has been discussed to death here, but then,
so has everything else. :-) We just keep doing it.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.


This might be a tall order. I mean, we weren't there. There are thousands
of recipes for vanlla ice cream, many of which made by the little old
ladies at the church. They made the recipe, their husbands and kids
cranked the freezers. When I've tried to perfect a recipe for something I
remembered from childhood, it has sometimes taken years. Be prepared! :-)

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.


The method or equipment for freezing the ice cream has far less to do with
the final product than the recipe. Still, the freezing method/equipment
can make some difference. I'd try to nail down the recipe first.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.


A very good recipe, but most likely very wrong. It's highly doubtful that
the ice cream you remember had any whipping cream in it, and very possibly
no eggs. One reason was economics, as canned milk products were less
expensive. Another is that many recipes including eggs required that they
be cooked into a custard with milk - time consuming.

More likely, those ice creams made for church socials were made with
evaporated milk, regular whole milk, sugar, and vanilla. Also, very
possibly, sweetened condensed milk. Remember, this wasn't gourmet ice
cream, although it tasted pretty darned good to most folks.

Here is one "no cook" vanilla ice cream that does use eggs, but note that
they are not cooked into a custard. This was very common years ago. If
you're worried about salmonella, you can use pasteurized eggs.

6 eggs
1 c. sugar
1 (14 oz.) can condensed milk
2 (13 oz.) cans evaporated milk
2 tbsp. vanilla
whole Milk to fill ice cream freeze

Beat eggs with mixer about 5 minutes. Gradually add sugar, then add
condensed milk and beat for another 2-3 minutes. Add evaporated milk and
vanilla. Mix thoroughly. Pour into ice cream freezer and add milk to
freezer line and freeze.

Here'a another that uses no eggs, and it does have some whipping cream in
it, but most of the dairy is from condensed,evaporated, and whole milk.

1 1/2 cups sugar
1 pint heavy cream -- (whipping cream)
1 can sweetened condensed milk -- (eagle brand)
1 can evaporated milk -- (carnation)
1 tablespoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
while milk -- to make 3 qts total

Add all ingredients except the milk to a mixing bowl and mix well. Pour
into ice cream freezer and add milk to make a total of 3 quarts (to fill
line in a 4 qt. mixer) of liquid.

If there are any old church ladies who know how to help me, I
appreciate it! If I need to buy an old hand cranking machine and take
an hour to prepare the mixture, I'm willing to do it.


I think the key flavor you're missing is coming from the canned milks. If
you determined the ice cream freezer you bought isn't giving you quite what
you want, you can get units like the old hand cranked machines that use a
motor, or with the crank.

HTH

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four,
unless there are three other people.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 09:06 AM
Jen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

My husband has often talked about the ice-cream his grandmother used to
make. It was probably similar to this church lady type one. Of course I
have no idea where to even start making it. So I might try these recipes
myself. But I don't have any type of ice-cream maker, isn't there a way of
beating it regularly and freezing in between to make ice-cream as well?

Jen


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Thu 08 Sep 2005 07:37:48p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.


Yep, you're right. Ice cream has been discussed to death here, but then,
so has everything else. :-) We just keep doing it.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.


This might be a tall order. I mean, we weren't there. There are
thousands
of recipes for vanlla ice cream, many of which made by the little old
ladies at the church. They made the recipe, their husbands and kids
cranked the freezers. When I've tried to perfect a recipe for something I
remembered from childhood, it has sometimes taken years. Be prepared! :-)

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.


The method or equipment for freezing the ice cream has far less to do with
the final product than the recipe. Still, the freezing method/equipment
can make some difference. I'd try to nail down the recipe first.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.


A very good recipe, but most likely very wrong. It's highly doubtful that
the ice cream you remember had any whipping cream in it, and very possibly
no eggs. One reason was economics, as canned milk products were less
expensive. Another is that many recipes including eggs required that they
be cooked into a custard with milk - time consuming.

More likely, those ice creams made for church socials were made with
evaporated milk, regular whole milk, sugar, and vanilla. Also, very
possibly, sweetened condensed milk. Remember, this wasn't gourmet ice
cream, although it tasted pretty darned good to most folks.

Here is one "no cook" vanilla ice cream that does use eggs, but note that
they are not cooked into a custard. This was very common years ago. If
you're worried about salmonella, you can use pasteurized eggs.

6 eggs
1 c. sugar
1 (14 oz.) can condensed milk
2 (13 oz.) cans evaporated milk
2 tbsp. vanilla
whole Milk to fill ice cream freeze

Beat eggs with mixer about 5 minutes. Gradually add sugar, then add
condensed milk and beat for another 2-3 minutes. Add evaporated milk and
vanilla. Mix thoroughly. Pour into ice cream freezer and add milk to
freezer line and freeze.

Here'a another that uses no eggs, and it does have some whipping cream in
it, but most of the dairy is from condensed,evaporated, and whole milk.

1 1/2 cups sugar
1 pint heavy cream -- (whipping cream)
1 can sweetened condensed milk -- (eagle brand)
1 can evaporated milk -- (carnation)
1 tablespoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
while milk -- to make 3 qts total

Add all ingredients except the milk to a mixing bowl and mix well. Pour
into ice cream freezer and add milk to make a total of 3 quarts (to fill
line in a 4 qt. mixer) of liquid.

If there are any old church ladies who know how to help me, I
appreciate it! If I need to buy an old hand cranking machine and take
an hour to prepare the mixture, I'm willing to do it.


I think the key flavor you're missing is coming from the canned milks. If
you determined the ice cream freezer you bought isn't giving you quite
what
you want, you can get units like the old hand cranked machines that use a
motor, or with the crank.

HTH

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four,
unless there are three other people.



  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 09:19 AM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jen" said:

My husband has often talked about the ice-cream his grandmother used to
make. It was probably similar to this church lady type one. Of course I
have no idea where to even start making it. So I might try these recipes
myself. But I don't have any type of ice-cream maker, isn't there a way of
beating it regularly and freezing in between to make ice-cream as well?


This recipe uses raw eggs, but that's never bothered me. It's very good
ice cream, courtesy of Miche in NZ:

VANILLA ICE CREAM Yield: about 1 1/2 litres/quarts

3 eggs, separated
3/4 cup caster sugar, divided in half
1 1/2 cups cream
1 1/2 teaspoons good vanilla essence/extract

Beat the egg yolks with half the sugar in a large bowl until very thick
and light in colour. Set aside. Beat the egg whites until soft peaks
form; add the other half of the sugar in two lots, beating well in
between, to form a meringue. The meringue mixture should end up very
stiff and glossy. Gently fold the meringue into the egg yolk mixture.
Set aside. Whip the cream with the vanilla essence until very thick.
Gently fold into the egg mixture. Pour into a 2-litre/quart container,
cover and freeze until solid (several hours, preferably overnight).

--
http://www.manilowfund.com/

"You Deserve a Break Today" by Barry Manilow


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 10:33 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri 09 Sep 2005 01:06:59a, Jen wrote in rec.food.cooking:

My husband has often talked about the ice-cream his grandmother used to
make. It was probably similar to this church lady type one. Of course
I have no idea where to even start making it. So I might try these
recipes myself. But I don't have any type of ice-cream maker, isn't
there a way of beating it regularly and freezing in between to make
ice-cream as well?

Jen


Yes, and the type of recipe you want is often called "refrigerator ice
cream" or "still frozen ice cream", as those recipes were developed when
there was only a small freezing unit suspended inside the top section of
refrigerators. The ice cream was frozen in the ice cube trays. Here is
one...

Refrigerator Ice Cream

2 ea Eggs
2 tb Sugar
1/2 c Sugar
1 c Whipping cream
1 1/2 c Milk; whole or condensed
1 ts Vanilla

Instructions:

Beat egg whites until stiff and add 2 T. sugar. Beat yolks and add rest of
sugar. Add milk to beaten yolks then beaten whites. Whip cream added last.
Freeze in refrigerator trays. Note: This recipe uses uncooked eggs and may
pose a health hazard due to salmonella. Source: Union County OH

Here is another...


---------- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

Title: Basic Refrigerator Ice Cream
Categories: Ice cream, Dessert
Yield: 1 servings

1 c Sugar
2 ts Cornstarch
1 qt Milk
3 Eggs, separated
2 ts Vanilla
1 c Heavy cream, whipped

Mix sugar and cornstarch in top of a double boiler and gradually stir in
milk. Add egg yolks and beat until frothy. Set over simmering water and
heat 15 minutes, stirring now and then at first in vanilla. Beat egg
whites to soft peaks and fold in. Pour into 2 refrigerator trays and
freeze until mushy. Spoon into a large bowl, beat heard until fluffy,
then beat in cream. Spoon into 3 trays and freeze until firm. (Note:
for extra smoothness, beat once more before freezing until firm.)

Variations:
Berry Ice Cream: prepare as directed but reduce vanilla to 1 tsp. and add
2 cups any crushed, sweetened-to-taste berries (fresh, frozen, or canned)
along with beaten egg whites.

Banana Ice Cream: Prepare as directed but reduce vanilla to 1 tsp. and add
2 cups pureed ripe bananas (about 6 medium-sized bananas) along with egg
whites.

Pineapple Ice Cream: Prepare as directed but reduce vanilla to 1 tsp. and
add 3 (8 oz.) cans crushed pineapple (un-drained) along with egg whites.

Peach or Apricot Ice Cream: Prepare as directed but reduce vanilla to 1/2
tsp. and add 1/2 tsp. almond extract; mix in 2 cups peach or apricot puree
along with beaten egg whites.

Orange Ice Cream: Prepare custard mixture as directed, using 3/4 cup sugar
and 3 cups milk. Add 1 (6 oz.) can thawed frozen orange juice concentrate
and 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice; omit vanilla. Proceed as
directed.

Chocolate Ice Cream: Add 2 (1 oz.) squares coarsely grated unsweetened
chocolate to hot custard mixture and stir until melted. Reduce vanilla to
1 tsp. and proceed as directed.

Burnt Almond Ice Cream: Prepare custard mixture as directed, using 1/2 cup
sugar; caramelize 1/2 cup sugar and mix in along with vanilla called for.
Proceed as directed, mixing 1 cup coarsely chopped toasted blanched
almonds into beaten frozen mixture along with whipped cream.

Butter Pecan Ice Cream: Prepare as directed, mixing 1 cup coarsely
chopped, butter-browned pecans into beaten frozen mixture along with
whipped cream.

Pistachio Ice Cream: Prepare as directed but reduce vanilla to 1 tsp. and
add 1/2 tsp. almond extract. Tint mixture pale green before freezing.
Mix 3/4 cup coarsely chopped pistachio nuts into beaten frozen mixture
along with whipped cream.

Peppermint Ice Cream: Prepare as directed but omit vanilla and add 1/4
tsp. peppermint extract; also mix 1 1/2 cups finely crushed peppermint
candy into beaten frozen mixture along with whipped cream.

Two general suggestions: put the bowl and beaters in the fridge or the
freezer, whatever you have space for. The colder the utensils are, the
less chance of everything melting when you go to beat it. Also, the
refrigerator trays they are talking about (for those of you young enough
to have only see the little plastic ones) are the old fashioned ice cube
trays that were made out of aluminum or some kind of light metal. They
had a lever that you pulled back to release the ice cubes. Remember
those? You can often times find them at yard sales for very reasonable
prices (like 15 cents!) cause people don't know what to do with them.
Clean them up, take out the insert that is there to make the ice cubes,
and use them to make the ice cream. Lacking that, any flattish, metal pan
will do.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four,
unless there are three other people.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 03:34 PM
Peter Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.

If there are any old church ladies who know how to help me, I
appreciate it! If I need to buy an old hand cranking machine and take
an hour to prepare the mixture, I'm willing to do it.

Kevin


I can't help with a recipe but I will tell you this - recreating remembered
childhood tastes is hopeless. Even if you exactly recreate the ice cream,
the fact is that you are an adult, not a child, and it will not taste the
same.


--
Peter Aitken


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Old 09-09-2005, 03:52 PM
Dimitri
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.


I don't have the book is the mixture cooked?

If not see below:

Dimitri


Home Recipes

Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe courtesy Alton Brown, 2005
Show: Good Eats
Episode: Churn Baby Churn, 2


3 cups half-and-half
1 cup heavy cream
8 large egg yolks
9 ounces vanilla sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
Place the half-and-half and the heavy cream into a medium saucepan, over medium
heat. Bring the mixture just to a simmer, stirring occasionally, and remove from
the heat.
In a medium mixing bowl whisk the egg yolks until they lighten in color.
Gradually add the sugar and whisk to combine. Temper the cream mixture into the
eggs and sugar by gradually adding small amounts, until about a third of the
cream mixture has been added. Pour in the remainder and return the entire
mixture to the saucepan and place over low heat. Continue to cook, stirring
frequently, until the mixture thickens slightly and coats the back of a spoon
and reaches 170 to 175 degrees F. Pour the mixture into a container and allow to
sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Stir in the vanilla extract. Place the
mixture into the refrigerator and once it is cool enough not to form
condensation on the lid, cover and store for 4 to 8 hours or until the
temperature reaches 40 degrees F or below.
Pour into an ice cream maker and process according to the manufacturer's
directions. This should take approximately 25 to 35 minutes. Serve as is for
soft serve or freeze for another 3 to 4 hours to allow the ice cream to harden.


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 05:05 PM
sueb
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 08 Sep 2005 07:37:48p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.


Yep, you're right. Ice cream has been discussed to death here, but then,
so has everything else. :-) We just keep doing it.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.


......... deleted stuff
I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.


A very good recipe, but most likely very wrong. It's highly doubtful that
the ice cream you remember had any whipping cream in it, and very possibly
no eggs. One reason was economics, as canned milk products were less
expensive. Another is that many recipes including eggs required that they
be cooked into a custard with milk - time consuming.

More likely, those ice creams made for church socials were made with
evaporated milk, regular whole milk, sugar, and vanilla. Also, very
possibly, sweetened condensed milk. Remember, this wasn't gourmet ice
cream, although it tasted pretty darned good to most folks.


Actually Wayne, I bet you are 180 degrees wrong. It's equally likely
that the church social ice cream was made with better ingredients than
he/she tried, because they were fresher. When my grandmother made ice
cream, she used fresh eggs (from her hens), and fresh milk and cream
(from her cows).

The only thing they used from cans were things they put into cans. And
cooking a custard was something done regularly, not thought of as
particularly onerous or time consuming. People used to expect to have
to take time cooking.

I suggest getting a hand cranked ice cream machine and continuing to
experiment. One thing that always gives me the "old timey" feel is the
slight taste of the rock salt in the finished product, as horrible as
that sounds.

Susan B.

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 05:28 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"sueb" wrote in message
ups.com...

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 08 Sep 2005 07:37:48p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.


Yep, you're right. Ice cream has been discussed to death here, but then,
so has everything else. :-) We just keep doing it.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.


........ deleted stuff
I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.


A very good recipe, but most likely very wrong. It's highly doubtful
that
the ice cream you remember had any whipping cream in it, and very
possibly
no eggs. One reason was economics, as canned milk products were less
expensive. Another is that many recipes including eggs required that they
be cooked into a custard with milk - time consuming.

More likely, those ice creams made for church socials were made with
evaporated milk, regular whole milk, sugar, and vanilla. Also, very
possibly, sweetened condensed milk. Remember, this wasn't gourmet ice
cream, although it tasted pretty darned good to most folks.


Actually Wayne, I bet you are 180 degrees wrong. It's equally likely
that the church social ice cream was made with better ingredients than
he/she tried, because they were fresher. When my grandmother made ice
cream, she used fresh eggs (from her hens), and fresh milk and cream
(from her cows).

The only thing they used from cans were things they put into cans. And
cooking a custard was something done regularly, not thought of as
particularly onerous or time consuming. People used to expect to have
to take time cooking.

I suggest getting a hand cranked ice cream machine and continuing to
experiment. One thing that always gives me the "old timey" feel is the
slight taste of the rock salt in the finished product, as horrible as
that sounds.

Susan B.


Our ice cream 'socials' in the late 1930's, the ice cream was always made
with everything from the farm, as above. Someone drove to town to buy ice
from the ice plant for the hand-cranked wooden ice cream freezer.
The ice cream usually in spite of the fact that it had 'cream' and eggs was
a bit runny when served, or should I say, it melted quickly when put in a
dish. We always had vanilla ice cream. I'll bet there was nothing really
anything exotic or mysterious about these recipes. I'd start with all good
products and an ice cream maker using salt and I'll bet you can reproduce it
in no time.
If I were you, though, I'd get a electric crank unless you have lots of
family taking turns.

One night on a very full stomach of ice creamcoming home (about 4 years old)
when my mom put me back in the rumble seat of the car, I can still remember
the stars overhead swirling around. I had eaten too much of it. Little did
I know until later in life I was lactose intolerant.
Dee Dee





  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 06:37 PM
hob
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies made
at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain taste, a
certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's been at least
15 years since I had such an ice cream.


Yes - as I remember, having been to many and worked at them, they would

1) buy a commercial container and scoop it out of that
- about 50 years back, they got it that cardboard can from the local
creamery - where milk came in in cream cans. And Mr B made his ice cream
out of the top cream. (his kid and I were in the same grade, his daughter
babysat me, so I hung around the creamery a bit)

2) use a packaged mix made with beaters - don't remember the name, it might
have even been a pudding - they beat it up and froze it - and maybe stirred
it a couple times - but it was pretty much air.

3) the ladies were too busy with daily chores and kids to hand-crank ice
cream for everybody - besides, making ice cream was man's and kid's work, as
I recall. It was a treat for special occasions, not a daily meal item.
In our extended family (13 aunts/uncles on one side, 11 on the other, not
counting inlaws families of almost the same size), and in all the gatherings
where ice cream was made, no lady ever turned the ice cream crank.
Hot day, nice clothes that were hard to clean and come by and little
anti-perspirant - no female would be caught dead in a social gathering doing
work like that.

as they used to say " horses sweat, men perspire, and women glow."

Note that ice cream back then had the "milk's taste", a taste which varied
with season depending on what the cow ate. Since cows in the summer were on
pasture, ice cream back then had the summer grass flavor.

fwiw........


In an attempt to recreate my childhood memory, I bought a "bachelor"
ice cream maker, VillaWare brand, but it's just not the same. Maybe
the maker has nothing to do with it.

I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.

If there are any old church ladies who know how to help me, I
appreciate it! If I need to buy an old hand cranking machine and take
an hour to prepare the mixture, I'm willing to do it.

Kevin



  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 06:59 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Fri 09 Sep 2005 09:05:52a, sueb wrote in rec.food.cooking:


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 08 Sep 2005 07:37:48p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Hi, I'm sure this topic has been addressed in one form or another on
the net. I've done some searching and found many threads about ice
cream.


Yep, you're right. Ice cream has been discussed to death here, but
then, so has everything else. :-) We just keep doing it.

The question I pose is pretty specific (in my mind) though. Does
anyone else remember the vanilla ice cream that little old ladies
made at church functions / social events? I can envision a certain
taste, a certain texture that I still long for to this day. It's
been at least 15 years since I had such an ice cream.


........ deleted stuff
I'm using a simple vanilla recipe from a Ben and Jerry's recipe book.
Heavy whipping cream, milk, vanilla, sugar, eggs. Very
straightforward, but it comes nowhere near the taste I'm looking for.


A very good recipe, but most likely very wrong. It's highly doubtful
that the ice cream you remember had any whipping cream in it, and very
possibly no eggs. One reason was economics, as canned milk products
were less expensive. Another is that many recipes including eggs
required that they be cooked into a custard with milk - time consuming.

More likely, those ice creams made for church socials were made with
evaporated milk, regular whole milk, sugar, and vanilla. Also, very
possibly, sweetened condensed milk. Remember, this wasn't gourmet ice
cream, although it tasted pretty darned good to most folks.


Actually Wayne, I bet you are 180 degrees wrong. It's equally likely
that the church social ice cream was made with better ingredients than
he/she tried, because they were fresher. When my grandmother made ice
cream, she used fresh eggs (from her hens), and fresh milk and cream
(from her cows).


I think we're talking about two different things here. What my
grandmother made at would have been like what your grandmother made at
home. What they made at the church was usually made to make a profit as
well as offer some entertainment.

The only thing they used from cans were things they put into cans. And
cooking a custard was something done regularly, not thought of as
particularly onerous or time consuming. People used to expect to have
to take time cooking.


Evaporated and condensed milk was used by many people in the early part of
the 20th century, not just today. If you look at old cookbooks, ice cream
recipes frequently call for both.


I suggest getting a hand cranked ice cream machine and continuing to
experiment. One thing that always gives me the "old timey" feel is the
slight taste of the rock salt in the finished product, as horrible as
that sounds.

Susan B.





--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 07:02 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Fri 09 Sep 2005 09:28:38a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Our ice cream 'socials' in the late 1930's, the ice cream was always
made with everything from the farm, as above. Someone drove to town to
buy ice from the ice plant for the hand-cranked wooden ice cream
freezer. The ice cream usually in spite of the fact that it had 'cream'
and eggs was a bit runny when served, or should I say, it melted quickly
when put in a dish. We always had vanilla ice cream. I'll bet there
was nothing really anything exotic or mysterious about these recipes.
I'd start with all good products and an ice cream maker using salt and
I'll bet you can reproduce it in no time.
If I were you, though, I'd get a electric crank unless you have lots of
family taking turns.

One night on a very full stomach of ice creamcoming home (about 4 years
old) when my mom put me back in the rumble seat of the car, I can still
remember the stars overhead swirling around. I had eaten too much of
it. Little did I know until later in life I was lactose intolerant.
Dee Dee


Well, the OP has already tried an ice cream made of cream, milk, eggs, and
sugar and that wasn't it.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2005, 07:14 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Fri 09 Sep 2005 09:28:38a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Our ice cream 'socials' in the late 1930's, the ice cream was always
made with everything from the farm, as above. Someone drove to town to
buy ice from the ice plant for the hand-cranked wooden ice cream
freezer. The ice cream usually in spite of the fact that it had 'cream'
and eggs was a bit runny when served, or should I say, it melted quickly
when put in a dish. We always had vanilla ice cream. I'll bet there
was nothing really anything exotic or mysterious about these recipes.
I'd start with all good products and an ice cream maker using salt and
I'll bet you can reproduce it in no time.
If I were you, though, I'd get a electric crank unless you have lots of
family taking turns.

One night on a very full stomach of ice creamcoming home (about 4 years
old) when my mom put me back in the rumble seat of the car, I can still
remember the stars overhead swirling around. I had eaten too much of
it. Little did I know until later in life I was lactose intolerant.
Dee Dee


Well, the OP has already tried an ice cream made of cream, milk, eggs, and
sugar and that wasn't it.


Wayne Boatwright **


Riiiiiiiiiight!
WELL! I said (along with my other wind-bag advice)
If I were you, though, I'd get a electric crank unless you have lots of
family taking turns.

Soooooorrrrry!!! I'll try to be a little more precise and exact and to the
point for the OP's, as do most of the posters here.
Phew!
Dee Dee




  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2005, 02:39 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri 09 Sep 2005 11:14:57a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Fri 09 Sep 2005 09:28:38a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Our ice cream 'socials' in the late 1930's, the ice cream was always
made with everything from the farm, as above. Someone drove to town

to
buy ice from the ice plant for the hand-cranked wooden ice cream
freezer. The ice cream usually in spite of the fact that it had 'cream'
and eggs was a bit runny when served, or should I say, it melted

quickly
when put in a dish. We always had vanilla ice cream. I'll bet there
was nothing really anything exotic or mysterious about these recipes.
I'd start with all good products and an ice cream maker using salt and
I'll bet you can reproduce it in no time.
If I were you, though, I'd get a electric crank unless you have lots of
family taking turns.

One night on a very full stomach of ice creamcoming home (about 4 years
old) when my mom put me back in the rumble seat of the car, I can still
remember the stars overhead swirling around. I had eaten too much of
it. Little did I know until later in life I was lactose intolerant.
Dee Dee


Well, the OP has already tried an ice cream made of cream, milk, eggs,

and
sugar and that wasn't it.


Wayne Boatwright **


Riiiiiiiiiight!
WELL! I said (along with my other wind-bag advice)
If I were you, though, I'd get a electric crank unless you have lots of
family taking turns.

Soooooorrrrry!!! I'll try to be a little more precise and exact and to

the
point for the OP's, as do most of the posters here.
Phew!
Dee Dee


That's what we love about you, Dee! :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!



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