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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 01:36 PM
MOMPEAGRAM
 
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"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

I've only been to London once and that was 30+ years ago and then it was
too crowded; I wonder what it is today. I feel the same about NY,
although it is an exciting thought to think about all the delis there.
Dee Dee


Much, much worse!



  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 02:57 PM
Vilco
 
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Mi e' parso che Dee Randall abbia scritto:

I found at Wegman's a wonderful cheese I hadn't had in
years, Morbier. For those who don't know it
http://www.interfrance.com/en/fc/ga_la-fromagerie.html &
stroll down to 'Morbier.' It was heaven.


Too wonderful view!
Of those, I had only raclette and morbier de jura, but they all
look so good!
--
Vilco
Think Pink , Drink Rose'


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 03:02 PM
Vilco
 
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Mi e' parso che Pandora abbia scritto:

Thank you Bob. Good recipe!


I quote.

My recipe is similar. The only differences are these:
1) I lard the meat with pieces of bacon;
2) I brown the meat in butter and oil with a cloves of
garlic and some rosemary (rosemary give a particular and
good taste to this dish), then I wet with 1/2 glass of
white wine. 3) I put a spoon of mustard in the milk.
4) I cook the pork in the oven for about 45 minutes;


Almost the same recipe as here, only one difference: we don't use
the mustard.
Cooking can happen in the oven or in the casserole, usually in
summer we go for the casserole.
--
Vilco
Think Pink , Drink Rose'


  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 03:55 PM
Boron Elgar
 
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On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 08:43:14 +0200, "Pandora"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio


Potatoes? Like a regular gnocchi? I had looked around on the net and
most recipes had just the chestnut and regular or wheat flour. How
interesting!
Thank you so much.
Gloria


I Am sure that if you put only flour, Gnocchi come out too hard and
difficult to digest!!!!
Cheers
Pandora



Spaetzle recipes are only flour and yet can be tender, so no potatoes
seemed "normal."

These are the ingredients from a recipe that I had found online and
seemed quite appealing:

Source: The Great Italian Cookbook (1987). Compiled by the Italian
Academy of Cookery. New York: International Culinary Society. ISBN:
0-517-63553-4
http://www.chestnutleaf.com/gnocchi_di_castagne.htm

3 cups chestnut flour

2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup whole shelled walnuts

1/3 cup pine nuts

1 cup oil

1 sprig parsley

2 cloves garlic

3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Make the gnocchi: Mix the chestnut flour and the all-purpose flour on
a board. Add sufficient water to produce a soft, smooth dough.
Divide the dough into pieces as large as an orange, then form
finger-thick rolls on the board. Cut these into segments about 3/4
inch long and press against the back of a fork or a grater to produce
the characteristic gnocchi shape. Keep separated so they do not stick
together.

Make the sauce: Blanch the walnuts in boiling water for 3-4 minutes to
help remove their skins and toast the pine nuts in the oven. Put all
the nuts in a mortar and pound well. Peel and finely chop the garlic
cloves. Fry with the parsley and 4 tbsp oil in a saucepan. Add the
nuts, stir and continue frying for a couple of minutes. Remove from
the heat and then add the remaining oil mixed with a little boiling
water (the water is necessary to obtain a smooth paste).

Boil the gnocchi in plenty of salted water for about 7-8 minutes.
Remove carefully with a slotted spoon, then transfer to individual
plates.

Cover each portion with some of the sauce and grated Parmesan cheese.

  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 04:23 PM
Pandora
 
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"Vilco" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
Mi e' parso che Pandora abbia scritto:

Thank you Bob. Good recipe!


I quote.

My recipe is similar. The only differences are these:
1) I lard the meat with pieces of bacon;
2) I brown the meat in butter and oil with a cloves of
garlic and some rosemary (rosemary give a particular and
good taste to this dish), then I wet with 1/2 glass of
white wine. 3) I put a spoon of mustard in the milk.
4) I cook the pork in the oven for about 45 minutes;


Almost the same recipe as here, only one difference: we don't use the
mustard.
Cooking can happen in the oven or in the casserole, usually in summer we
go for the casserole.


At this point, perhaps is better the pressure cooking because you haven't to
add every time the liquid. But I have never tried before.
In the pressure pot I always cook the *Vitello Tonnato* (veil tonnč) and
comes out very good.
Ciao
Pandora




  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 04:34 PM
Pandora
 
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"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 08:43:14 +0200, "Pandora"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio


Potatoes? Like a regular gnocchi? I had looked around on the net and
most recipes had just the chestnut and regular or wheat flour. How
interesting!
Thank you so much.
Gloria


I Am sure that if you put only flour, Gnocchi come out too hard and
difficult to digest!!!!
Cheers
Pandora



Spaetzle recipes are only flour and yet can be tender, so no potatoes
seemed "normal."

These are the ingredients from a recipe that I had found online and
seemed quite appealing:

Source: The Great Italian Cookbook (1987). Compiled by the Italian
Academy of Cookery. New York: International Culinary Society. ISBN:
0-517-63553-4
http://www.chestnutleaf.com/gnocchi_di_castagne.htm

3 cups chestnut flour

2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup whole shelled walnuts

1/3 cup pine nuts

1 cup oil

1 sprig parsley

2 cloves garlic

3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Make the gnocchi: Mix the chestnut flour and the all-purpose flour on
a board. Add sufficient water to produce a soft, smooth dough.
Divide the dough into pieces as large as an orange, then form
finger-thick rolls on the board. Cut these into segments about 3/4
inch long and press against the back of a fork or a grater to produce
the characteristic gnocchi shape. Keep separated so they do not stick
together.

Make the sauce: Blanch the walnuts in boiling water for 3-4 minutes to
help remove their skins and toast the pine nuts in the oven. Put all
the nuts in a mortar and pound well. Peel and finely chop the garlic
cloves. Fry with the parsley and 4 tbsp oil in a saucepan. Add the
nuts, stir and continue frying for a couple of minutes. Remove from
the heat and then add the remaining oil mixed with a little boiling
water (the water is necessary to obtain a smooth paste).

Boil the gnocchi in plenty of salted water for about 7-8 minutes.
Remove carefully with a slotted spoon, then transfer to individual
plates.
Cover each portion with some of the sauce and grated Parmesan cheese.


I don't know how they can come out. The ideal should be boiled chestnut that
you use like potatoes togheter with chestnut flour! Gnocchi should come more
savoury. Unfortunately we have to wait october to see chestnuts.
BTW I have seen that some people make this kind of Gnocchi with dried
chestnuts, also.
We must try some recipes.
Thank you, I will try your recipe too.
Cheers
Pandora


  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 04:38 PM
TammyM
 
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"Bob" wrote in message
...
Pandora replied:

I use chestnut flour in the wintertime to make chestnut polenta, which
I serve with pork braised in milk. It's a wonderful combination.


This is a very good idea! I've never made it. I must try. Coul you give

me
the recipe also for pork braised in milk? I make a pork roast with milk;

I
want to confront my recipe with yours.


This is the recipe I follow; it was posted by evergene in this group back

in
1995:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
This recipe and the next one come from "The Classic Italian Cookbook", by
Marcella Hazan. They are interesting and very tasty. Be advised,

however,
that Ms. Hazan is, uh, fussy. (We used to refer to her as "She Who Must

Be
Obeyed".) Note that she calls for slices of meat "3/8 inch thick."

Pork Loin Braised in Milk
(from "The Classic Italian Cookbook", by Marcella Hazan)

(She writes Pork loin cooked by this method turns out to be

exceptionally
tender and juicy. It is quite delicate, because it loses all its fat and
the milk, as such, disappears, to be replaced by clusters of delicious,
nut-brown sauce.)

2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 pounds pork loin in one piece, with some fat on it, securely tied
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 1/2 cups milk

1. Heat the butter and oil over medium-high heat in a casserole large

enough
to just contain the pork. When the butter foam subsides add the meat, fat
side facing down. Brown thoroughly on all sides, lowering the heat if the
butter starts to turn dark brown.

2. Add the salt, pepper and milk. (Add the milk slowly, otherwise it may
boil over.) Shortly after the milk comes to a boil, turn the heat down to
medium, cover, but not tightly, with the lid partly askew, and cook slowly
for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until the meat is easily pierced by a fork.
Turn and baste the meat from time to time, and, if necessary, add a little
milk. By the time the meat is cooked the milk should have coagulated into
small nut-brown clusters. If it is still pale in color, uncover the pot,
raise the heat to high, and cook briskly until it darkens.

3. Remove the meat to a cutting board and allow to cool off slightly for

a
few minutes. Remove the trussing string, carve into slices 3/8 inch

thick,
and arrange them on a warm platter. Draw off most of the fat from the pot
with a spoon and discard, being careful not to discard any of the

coagulated
milk clusters. Taste and correct for salt. (There may be as much as 1 to

1
1/2 cups of fat to be removed.) Add 2 or 3 tablespoons of warm water,

turn
the heat to high, and boil away the water while scraping and loosening all
the cooking residue in the pot. Spoon the sauce over the sliced pork and
serve immediately.


About 25 years ago, I had a cooking class with Biba Caggiano (I and about 10
other students, including my auntie.) She made pork loin braised in milk,
it is one of the most delicious dishes I've ever tasted. I've made it a few
times, but never has it been as good as hers. Must try it again (when it
cools off -- IF it cools off!!!)

TammyM


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 04:41 PM
TammyM
 
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"Pandora" wrote in message
...

I'll give you recipe as soon as possible. I will make
Gnocchi today or tomorrow.
Cheers
Pandora


I am eagerly awaiting your posting of this recipe! Do you think it would go
well with the pork loin braised in milk?

TammyM -- will buy chestnut flour this w/e



  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 04:44 PM
Shaun aRe
 
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"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"Shaun aRe" wrote in message
eenews.net...


Ahh, thanks - will look in the w/f places. No It. delis here many many
many
miles from The London, unfortunately (but I'd not move to London for all
the
delis in the damned world!).

Cheers,
Shaun aRe


I've only been to London once and that was 30+ years ago and then it was

too
crowded; I wonder what it is today. I feel the same about NY, although it
is an exciting thought to think about all the delis there.
Dee Dee


Hectic, busy, furious even - it makes my head spin. Even sitting looks like
a frantic affair for me, and I'm a fairly hyper, fidget, 'must move' kinda
guy. I don't like that you hardly if ever can see the horizon, either. I can
enjoy it for short periods of time (like a couple days) but it wears on me
very quickly. I'm not a 'country boy' but hells, I *LOVE* my surroundings to
be green, natural places as much as possible. I like to walk in woods,
through fields, by and in rivers. I'll settle for limited delis, for that
greenness and some good markets like we have here any day!

',;~}~


Shaun aRe - It's beautiful countryside where we live.


  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 04:45 PM
Shaun aRe
 
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"MOMPEAGRAM" wrote in message
news:[email protected] eranews...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

I've only been to London once and that was 30+ years ago and then it was
too crowded; I wonder what it is today. I feel the same about NY,
although it is an exciting thought to think about all the delis there.
Dee Dee


Much, much worse!


In some ways, but, I'm betting it's mostly a darn lot cleaner than it was
even 30 y/ago.


Shaun aRe




  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 05:21 PM
Pandora
 
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"TammyM" ha scritto nel messaggio
...

"Pandora" wrote in message
...

I'll give you recipe as soon as possible. I will make
Gnocchi today or tomorrow.
Cheers
Pandora


I am eagerly awaiting your posting of this recipe! Do you think it would
go
well with the pork loin braised in milk?


Surely!!!! Bob gave us a good idea!
Cheers
Pandora
Ps. I Am curious like a cat. I Am very nearly to do them now )))
I let you know.

TammyM -- will buy chestnut flour this w/e





  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 11:55 PM
Jean B.
 
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Pandora wrote:

I will make this week. Then I will tell you.
Cheers
Pandora.


Thanks! I see you have been experimenting since then.

--
Jean B.
  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-07-2005, 06:51 AM
Pandora
 
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"Jean B." ha scritto nel messaggio
...
Pandora wrote:

I will make this week. Then I will tell you.
Cheers
Pandora.


Thanks! I see you have been experimenting since then.

--
Jean B.


Yes. You are right: experiments )
Pandora


  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-07-2005, 01:57 PM
Shaun aRe
 
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"Pandora" wrote in message
...

"TammyM" ha scritto nel messaggio
...

"Pandora" wrote in message
...

I'll give you recipe as soon as possible. I will make
Gnocchi today or tomorrow.
Cheers
Pandora


I am eagerly awaiting your posting of this recipe! Do you think it

would
go
well with the pork loin braised in milk?


Surely!!!! Bob gave us a good idea!
Cheers
Pandora
Ps. I Am curious like a cat. I Am very nearly to do them now )))
I let you know.

TammyM -- will buy chestnut flour this w/e


I have seen it now! I will, with my wife, be searching now for the chestnut
flour - I will let you know if we make it well or not - thanks for the
recipe Pandora ',;~}~


Shaun aRe
--
May all your wishes be both wise and fulfilled.


  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-07-2005, 06:32 PM
Jean B.
 
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Pandora wrote:

Yes. You are right: experiments )
Pandora


I like the idea of rolling such things on a grooved cutting
board. :-)

--
Jean B.


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