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Old 21-06-2005, 12:31 AM
Will
 
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Default Wheat bread vs Whole Wheat Bread ???

Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good stuff
in them... meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?

thanks for the help - Will



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Old 21-06-2005, 01:07 AM
Dan Abel
 
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In article , "Will"
wrote:

Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good stuff
in them... meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?



As Sheldon would post, what do you think white bread is made out of?
Wheat! It's *all* wheat bread. What's the difference? The brown stuff
labeled as "wheat" has food coloring added. Perhaps you want "whole
wheat" bread?


:-)

--
Dan Abel
Sonoma State University
AIS

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Old 21-06-2005, 01:16 AM
Julia Altshuler
 
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The wheat kernel has 3 parts:

the germ (contains oil, vitamins)
the endosperm (the part white flour is made from, has the gluten)
the bran (has the fiber, makes a denser loaf).


Depending on your diet and what constitutes good nutrition for you, you
want flour made from one, the other, some, or all of the 3 parts. Whole
wheat flour should mean flour made from all 3, and many consumers want
bread made from whole wheat flour-- or rather, they think they want
that. Then they discover that whole wheat bread is denser, chewier, not
as light as the white bread they're used to. There are consumers who
want to think they're eating whole wheat bread for the nutritional
advantage when they simultaneously want a loaf that's exactly like the
white bread they prefer.


This provides a rich environment for advertisers to take advantage of
the situation. By advertising "wheat bread," they can be telling the
literal truth. The bread is made from wheat flour (as opposed to rye or
corn or oat or any number of other grains or substances that can be
ground into flour). But the bread is not made from the whole wheat
kernel (or has only a little whole wheat flour in it). The word "wheat"
conjures up the picture of "whole wheat" in the consumer's mind.


Paydirt! The consumers get the light loaf they prefer to eat while
getting the warm fuzzy feeling that comes with eating health food.
Meanwhile, white flour is cheaper by far so the bakery (or Subway or
similar company) saves money. I don't know the specific buns you're
talking about at Subway, but I have seen bread that was made with
processed refined white flour plus coloring to turn it brown. That's
cheaper than using whole wheat flour in the first place.


I should stress that white flour is not necessarily a bad or inferior
product. This is one of those situations where the best bread for you
depends on what you like and your specific nutritional needs.


--Lia


Will wrote:
Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it, meaning the good stuff out of whole grain, but I'm not sure of
this. I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better.

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good stuff
in them, meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?

Thanks for the help - Will



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Old 21-06-2005, 01:34 AM
Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default

In article , "Will"
wrote:

Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?


Look for at least 3g of dietary fiber per slice. Sara Lee makes some
"Heart Healthy" breads that fill that bill.
--
-Barb, http://www.jamlady.eboard.com 6/17/05 Pictures & story
from Notable Women's Dinner at the Governor's Residence.
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Old 21-06-2005, 02:05 AM
sarah bennett
 
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Will wrote:
Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good stuff
in them... meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?

thanks for the help - Will



"wheat" bread is dark colored "wonder" type bread. If you want whole
grains, look at the ingredients. The first one should be "100% whole
{whatever grain}"

--

saerah

"It's not a gimmick, it's an incentive."- asterbark, afca

aware of the manifold possibilities of the future

"I think there's a clause in the Shaman's and Jujumen's Local #57 Union
contract that they have to have reciprocity for each other's shop rules."
-König Prüß


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Old 21-06-2005, 03:26 AM
Chris
 
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"sarah bennett" wrote in message
...


"wheat" bread is dark colored "wonder" type bread. If you want whole
grains, look at the ingredients. The first one should be "100% whole
{whatever grain}"


True. There are some commercial 100% whole wheat breads that are not as
dense/dry/chewy as others. The lighter, fluffier 100% whole wheat
breads (such as those made by Wonder or Schmidt's) use added ingredients
to lighten the bread. I find these loaves to be a good compromise; you
might not be getting as much whole grain per slice as you do in a
heavier loaf, but it's still a whole grain product and is more like
white bread than the heavy/chewy type w/out the added ingredients.

Also, beware of "multigrain" or 7-grain, 9-grain, 12-grain or 15-grain
bread. Read the label. Sometimes these loaves are 100% whole grain,
but sometimes the first ingredient is "Enriched wheat flour" (not a
whole grain -- that's white flour with vitamins added).

Chris


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Old 21-06-2005, 02:06 PM
Peter Aitken
 
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Default

"Will" wrote in message
. ..
Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good
stuff in them... meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?

thanks for the help - Will


Pasty white Wonder bread is wheat bread. It is made from wheat after all but
just poart pof the wheat with the germ and bran removed - white flour in
other words. You need whole wheat bread which uses flour made from the
entire wheat kernel.


--
Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


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Old 21-06-2005, 03:14 PM
Sheldon
 
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Chris wrote:
"sarah bennett" wrote:


"wheat" bread is dark colored "wonder" type bread. If you want whole
grains, look at the ingredients. The first one should be "100% whole
{whatever grain}"


True. There are some commercial 100% whole wheat breads that are not as
dense/dry/chewy as others. The lighter, fluffier 100% whole wheat
breads (such as those made by Wonder or Schmidt's) use added ingredients
to lighten the bread. I find these loaves to be a good compromise; you
might not be getting as much whole grain per slice as you do in a
heavier loaf, but it's still a whole grain product and is more like
white bread than the heavy/chewy type w/out the added ingredients.

Also, beware of "multigrain" or 7-grain, 9-grain, 12-grain or 15-grain
bread. Read the label. Sometimes these loaves are 100% whole grain,
but sometimes the first ingredient is "Enriched wheat flour" (not a
whole grain -- that's white flour with vitamins added).

Chris


You really haven't a clue about bread, and how I know is that you
mention "added ingredients", twice... but never give even one example.
"Added ingredients' is a STUPID term, EVERY ingredient in EVERY recipe
is ADDED! DUH Nothing you've written is accurate, in fact from reading
each post in this thread, not one gives accurate information (100%
"whatever" morons). Stick to bakery stuff yooose know, like how to open
a bag of Oreos.

Sheldon

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Old 21-06-2005, 03:20 PM
Sheldon
 
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Default



Dan Abel wrote:
In article , "Will"
wrote:

Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good stuff
in them... meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?



As Sheldon would post, what do you think white bread is made out of?
Wheat! It's *all* wheat bread. What's the difference? The brown stuff
labeled as "wheat" has food coloring added. Perhaps you want "whole
wheat" bread?


I would never say any such thing, everything you wrote is 100%
incorrect.

Sheldon

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Old 21-06-2005, 05:01 PM
Sheldon
 
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Default



Will wrote:
Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed the
"good stuff" out of it.


Not 100% necessarily so... plain old white wheat bread (like Wonder)
may contain far more nutrition than many typical 100% whole wheat
breads. Often *enriched* flours contain more nutrition than whole
grain flours (in almost all cases, ounce for ounce, any enriched flour
contains more nutrition than the natural whole grain flour
counterpart). About the only dietary component one can be fairly
certain of receivng more of from whole grain bread is bran (which of
course contains 0% nutritional value - bran is a dietary component, not
a nutritional component). To know the nutritional value contained in
commercailly prepared breads you need to read the label... with
homemade breads there is no way to make such a determination, leastways
no practical way... for the vast majority of home bakers they'd need
access to a food testing laboratory. Typically commercially prepared
breads (especially the big brands) contain greater nutritional value
than homemade.

Most of the vitamin nutrition in grains is contained in the germ,
whereas most of that nutrition is lost just by the milling process,
more is lost simply by being around awhile, and then most of what
manages to remain is lost from exposure to heat in baking. I'm sure
some of you have noticed that wheat germ is packaged in glass jars,
vacuum packed... and clearly state to refrigerate upon opening. I've
yet to see any whole grain flours sold in the refrigerated case... so
by the time you buy it it's already too late to preserve it's nutrition
by refrigerating.

The big commercial bread companys purchase their wheat before it's
planted, and then oversees its treatment every step of the way,
monitoring it constantly from seed to finished product. Flours yoose
buy off the stupidmarket shelf is typically already well past it's
prime. One of the best ways for the home baker to obtain full
nutritional value is to include some whole *unprocessed* grains in
their bread... and find a source where there is good turnover and
proper storage (preferably refrigerated). Of course one can always
mill their own flours, but still include some whole unprocessed grain
because heat generated from milling destroys/evaporates much vitamin
nutrition.

Sheldon



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Old 22-06-2005, 12:39 PM
Shaun aRe
 
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Default


"Sheldon" wrote in message
ups.com...


Dan Abel wrote:
In article , "Will"
wrote:

Seems like I heard that most "wheat bread" at the store has processed

the
"good stuff" out of it... meaning the good stuff out of whole grain...

But I'm not sure of this...

I'm trying to eat more whole grains and want to understand this

better...

1 - Can anyone educate me on this subject?

2 - Also, anybody know if the wheat bread buns at Subway has the good

stuff
in them... meaning all the value of whole grain or whatever?



As Sheldon would post, what do you think white bread is made out of?
Wheat! It's *all* wheat bread. What's the difference? The brown stuff
labeled as "wheat" has food coloring added. Perhaps you want "whole
wheat" bread?


I would never say any such thing, everything you wrote is 100%
incorrect.

Sheldon


Exactly.



Shaun aRe




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