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Old 25-05-2005, 05:38 PM
Bob (this one)
 
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Default [Fwd: Red Delicious most nutritious]



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Red Delicious most nutritious
Date: 25 May 2005 09:26:00 -0700
From: Roman Bystrianyk
Organization: http://groups.google.com
Newsgroups: sci.med.nutrition,misc.health.alternative

Joe Friesen, "Red Delicious most nutritious", Globe and Mail, May 24,
2005,
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...ES24/TPHealth/

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but new research shows that
when it comes to healthy eating, not all apples are created equal.

A study by scientists at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to be
published this week indicates that of the eight main varieties of apple
grown in Ontario, the Red Delicious is the most nutritious.

Red Delicious apples contain more than five times as many antioxidants
as Empire apples, the variety with the lowest antioxidant level, said
the study's lead researcher, Rong Tsao.

"Redder apples are generally richer in antioxidants than pale coloured
apples," Dr. Tsao said, explaining that antioxidants are the "good
chemicals in fruits and vegetables that help us fight cancers and
cardiovascular diseases.

"These are the compounds that are known to fight with the so-called
free radicals in our body."

"The free radicals are the culprits of modern human chronic diseases."

The study is notable because it pinpoints for the first time the
individual molecules that contribute most to antioxidant activities in
apples. Those molecules were found to be much more prevalent in the
skin of the apple than in the flesh of the fruit, leading Dr. Tsao to
recommend Canadians put down their peelers and eat the whole apple.

Identifying those molecules will also help scientists such as Dr. Tsao
as they try to produce new breeds of apples that could potentially
contain more concentrated nutritional benefits.

"So instead of eating two [apples], or even one, you can cut the
[portion] size in half," Dr. Tsao said.

There were significant differences in the antioxidant levels of the
apple varieties used in the study.

The flesh of the Northern Spy was found to be richest in antioxidants,
while the Empire and the Mutsu had the lowest levels in both their
flesh and skin. All the apples used in the study were grown at the same
orchard near Woodstock, Ont., and under the same agronomic conditions
to guarantee the consistency of the results.

Dr. Tsao, who works out of the federal Department of Agriculture and
Agri-Food's lab in Guelph, Ont., said the results don't necessarily
mean consumers will change their apple-eating habits, or that farmers
should start producing only certain varieties.

"Food is a very interesting thing. People don't always choose food by
what is most nutritious," he said.

Apples, which he believes are the second most commonly consumed fruit
after bananas, are not as rich in antioxidants as blueberries or
blackberries. They are, however, more affordable, more widely available
and more robust when it comes to storage, which means that an apple a
day may the most effective means of ensuring a healthy dose of
antioxidants.

Dr. Tsao now plans to use his findings to work with companies in the
apple juicing industry to create new products from apple waste. The
juicing industry typically discards the peels, he said, which are rich
in antioxidants. That material could be reworked and sold as a new kind
of nutritional product for human or animal consumption.

The study will be published on-line this week in the Journal of
Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Other popular apple varieties, such as
the Granny Smith or the Gala, were left out of the study because they
are not grown locally.

A new study on apples shows that of the eight main varieties grown in
Ontario, Red Delicious has the most antioxidant activity. Antioxidants
in apples have been associated with lowered risks for certain kinds of
cancer.

THE APPLE SKIN TOP 8*

Red Delicious; 17,851

Ida Red; 12,083

Cortland; 11,908

Northern Spy; 10,044

Golden Delicious; 9,616

Mutsu; 6,820

McIntosh; 6.436

Empire; 2,736

THE APPLE FLESH TOP 8*

Northern Spy; 6,425

Cortland; 3,660

Red Delicious; 3,215

MacIntosh; 2,785

Ida Red; 2,749

Golden Delicious; 2,036

Mutsu; 1,584

Empire; 550

*Measured in FRAP units of antioxidant activity - FRAP is a commonly
used measure of antioxidant activity

SOURCE: DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND AGRI FOOD

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Old 25-05-2005, 08:58 PM
Gabby
 
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Default


"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...


Dr. Tsao, who works out of the federal Department of Agriculture and
Agri-Food's lab in Guelph, Ont., said the results don't necessarily
mean consumers will change their apple-eating habits, or that farmers
should start producing only certain varieties.

"Food is a very interesting thing. People don't always choose food by
what is most nutritious," he said.


I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple, nutritious
or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep eating those.

Gabby


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Old 25-05-2005, 09:34 PM
Chris
 
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"Gabby" wrote in message
...

I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple,
nutritious or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep
eating those.


I agree about red delicious apples. Whoever named them must not have
tasted them first! But I've had some very good golden delicious apples
in season -- some grown in Washington, and some grown locally. I was
surprised at how good they were.

Chris


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Old 25-05-2005, 09:37 PM
Andy
 
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Default

"Gabby" wrote in
:


"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...


Dr. Tsao, who works out of the federal Department of Agriculture and
Agri-Food's lab in Guelph, Ont., said the results don't necessarily
mean consumers will change their apple-eating habits, or that farmers
should start producing only certain varieties.

"Food is a very interesting thing. People don't always choose food by
what is most nutritious," he said.


I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple,
nutritious or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep
eating those.

Gabby



Gabby,

Never tried those. I'm stuck on Fiji apples.

Andy
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Old 25-05-2005, 09:54 PM
Curly Sue
 
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Default

On Wed, 25 May 2005 16:58:04 -0300, "Gabby"
wrote:


"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...


Dr. Tsao, who works out of the federal Department of Agriculture and
Agri-Food's lab in Guelph, Ont., said the results don't necessarily
mean consumers will change their apple-eating habits, or that farmers
should start producing only certain varieties.

"Food is a very interesting thing. People don't always choose food by
what is most nutritious," he said.


I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple, nutritious
or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep eating those.

Gabby


Absolutely! I think the Red Delicious, anyway, were developed to
withstand long-distance transport and to look beautiful in displays.
They should have been called "Red Beautiful."

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


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Old 25-05-2005, 11:09 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default

Chris wrote:
"Gabby" wrote in message
...

I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple,
nutritious or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep
eating those.


I agree about red delicious apples. Whoever named them must not have
tasted them first! But I've had some very good golden delicious
apples in season -- some grown in Washington, and some grown locally.
I was surprised at how good they were.

Chris


My small parrot won't touch a red delicious. She likes Golden Delicious and
Gala apples, that's about it. I like apple juice but don't care for the
texture of *any* apple.

Jill


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Old 26-05-2005, 12:18 AM
Gabby
 
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Default


"Chris" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Gabby" wrote in message
...

I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple,
nutritious or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep eating
those.


I agree about red delicious apples. Whoever named them must not have
tasted them first! But I've had some very good golden delicious apples in
season -- some grown in Washington, and some grown locally. I was
surprised at how good they were.


Don't think I've come across a good golden delicious but I'll take your word
for it. DH usually buys Granny Smiths and I like those just fine. Mac are
a bit too sweet for my taste. Cortlands are fine, but my favorites 'grocery
store' variety is Gravenstein.

But back in the days of the dinosaurs when I was growing up there was a
variety of apples we knew as "August apples". These were green apples, kind
of mealy and very tart -- I've no idea what they were. We ate them
sprinkled with salt. It seemed that all the old houses in our village had
at least one tree of those; unfortunately, there is nary a one left. I
think the last time I ate an August apple was in P.E.I. about 17 years ago,
when we happened upon a tree in someone's front yard while out driving
around. We rang the doorbell and asked if we could buy a few. Needless to
say, we went home with a bag full and the guy's good wishes.


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Old 26-05-2005, 12:19 AM
George
 
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Default

Chris wrote:
"Gabby" wrote in message
...

I'd rather chew cardboard than a red or golden delicious apple,
nutritious or not. But Cortlands are right up there so I'll keep
eating those.



I agree about red delicious apples. Whoever named them must not have
tasted them first! But I've had some very good golden delicious apples
in season -- some grown in Washington, and some grown locally. I was
surprised at how good they were.

Chris


They used to taste good. Then they kept on "tweaking" them to look like
a perfect apple but lost the flavor along the way. The Fuji apple is the
"repaired" version of the red delicious. It is a cross breed developed
by the Japanese to bring the flavor back.
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Old 26-05-2005, 12:51 AM
 
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Default

THey taste like crap.

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Old 26-05-2005, 12:53 AM
Dave Smith
 
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Chris wrote:


I agree about red delicious apples. Whoever named them must not have
tasted them first! But I've had some very good golden delicious apples
in season -- some grown in Washington, and some grown locally. I was
surprised at how good they were.

I am with you there. I always thought that "Delicious" was a misnomer,
since they were the least tasty of all apples. Let me rephrase that.
They weren't just the least tasty. They were the worst tasting.






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Old 26-05-2005, 01:25 AM
Chris
 
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Default


"Andy" wrote in message
6...

Never tried those. I'm stuck on Fiji apples.



My favorites are Nittany...or Stayman...


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Old 26-05-2005, 02:01 PM
enigma
 
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Default

"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:


Dr. Tsao, who works out of the federal Department of
Agriculture and Agri-Food's lab in Guelph, Ont., said the
results don't necessarily mean consumers will change their
apple-eating habits, or that farmers should start producing
only certain varieties.

"Food is a very interesting thing. People don't always
choose food by what is most nutritious," he said.


that's because Red Delicious apples are *nasty*! i think they
tacked "delicious" on the name to try & fool people.

Dr. Tsao now plans to use his findings to work with
companies in the apple juicing industry to create new
products from apple waste. The juicing industry typically
discards the peels, he said, which are rich in
antioxidants. That material could be reworked and sold as a
new kind of nutritional product for human or animal
consumption.


duh! apple squeezings are already used in livestock feed. i
get huge bags of pressed (organic) apples for my steers. they
*love* it. and it's free because the orchard doesn't want it
(guess they don't understand composting)
lee
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Old 27-05-2005, 12:37 AM
Rick & Cyndi
 
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Default


"enigma" wrote in message
. ..
"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:


Dr. Tsao, who works out of the federal Department of
Agriculture and Agri-Food's lab in Guelph, Ont., said the
results don't necessarily mean consumers will change their
apple-eating habits, or that farmers should start producing
only certain varieties.

"Food is a very interesting thing. People don't always
choose food by what is most nutritious," he said.


that's because Red Delicious apples are *nasty*! i think they
tacked "delicious" on the name to try & fool people.

Dr. Tsao now plans to use his findings to work with
companies in the apple juicing industry to create new
products from apple waste. The juicing industry typically
discards the peels, he said, which are rich in
antioxidants. That material could be reworked and sold as a
new kind of nutritional product for human or animal
consumption.


duh! apple squeezings are already used in livestock feed. i
get huge bags of pressed (organic) apples for my steers. they
*love* it. and it's free because the orchard doesn't want it
(guess they don't understand composting)
lee

======

Actually, I can remember a time (30 or 35 years ago) when Red Delicious
actually *were* good...

Cyndi




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