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  #46 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 07:21 AM
Bob
 
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Ariane wrote:

I also don't know where you get that idea about eggs being "the most
revered ingedient in Chinese cuisine". I'm guessing you got it from the
same place as "only yolk is used in fried rice" and "few procedures in
Asian cuisine take longer than 3 minutes".



Same place he gets most of the misbegotten bizarrerie he posts as if they
were facts: His ass.

(Hey, here's a question: Since when is there a unified "Asian" cuisine?)

Bob



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Old 31-03-2005, 07:39 AM
Ariane Jenkins
 
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On 31 Mar 2005 00:21:03 -0600, Bob wrote:
Ariane wrote:

I also don't know where you get that idea about eggs being "the most
revered ingedient in Chinese cuisine". I'm guessing you got it from the
same place as "only yolk is used in fried rice" and "few procedures in
Asian cuisine take longer than 3 minutes".



Same place he gets most of the misbegotten bizarrerie he posts as if they
were facts: His ass.


That would seem to be the case... ;D

(Hey, here's a question: Since when is there a unified "Asian" cuisine?)


LOL, there isn't, of course. But I don't know of any single Asian
cuisine where Sheldon's claim applies, and it certainly doesn't apply to Asian
cuisines in general. But perhaps we should consider the source, as mentioned
above. g

Ariane
--
Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
relationships is you.
http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html

  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 06:08 PM
Gal Called J.J.
 
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One time on Usenet, "jmcquown" said:
"Ariane Jenkins" wrote in message
...
On 29 Mar 2005 19:13:00 -0800, Sheldon wrote:

aem wrote:
Sheldon wrote:
[snip preceding]

You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
yolk is fried


Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and
sour soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately from
the rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making
it. An aunt
of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin pancake and then
cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other aunts of mine simply
scramble it with the rice so that it forms small chunks mixed in with
everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's faster and it tastes
just as good.


snip

Thanks, Ariane. I don't know that my recipe is "authentic", just that
mother was given it in Thailand and I've been enjoying it for over 30 years
and making it myself for over 20. I definitely use whole egg in fried rice
and in these dumplings.


I also use whole eggs in fried rice -- once the rice is ready, I push
it over and make a spot to quickly cook and cut the scrambled egg. Then
I mix the chunks of egg back into the rice. It looks like the stuff I
get at Chinese restaurants, so I must be doing something right... :-)

--
J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
"You still haven't explained why the pool is
filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
  #49 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 06:18 PM
Default User
 
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Rusty wrote:


I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.



Yep. It would be great if you needed to shake cornstarch on something,
I guess. I have little call for that.




Brian
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Old 01-04-2005, 01:00 AM
Arri London
 
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Rusty wrote:

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 17:45:28 -0700, Arri London
wrote:


Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?



LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
next box.




That's my gripe.

So why don't the cornstarch vendors package it in wide- mouth screwtop
jars to beging with? Most food products (I didn't say "all") are used
from the container they are sold in. If you have to move it to a
different container to use it, then I don't believe it's packaged
correctly.

Rusty


Because then the consumer would need to pay more for it and most of that
glass would end up in landfill.
We repackage most of our dry food items in glass jars or large airtight
tins. They stay fresher that way and no insect intrusion.


  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-04-2005, 01:15 AM
aem
 
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Rusty wrote:
So why don't the cornstarch vendors package it in wide- mouth
screwtop jars to beging with? Most food products (I didn't say
"all") are used from the container they are sold in. If you have
to move it to a different container to use it, then I don't
believe it's packaged correctly.


Sorry 'bout that, but it's probably because most people don't spray
cornstarch all over the kitchen. Therefore, Kingsford et al. don't get
a lot of complaints about their packaging. I'm not saying you're
clumsy g but it appears that you don't pay quite enough attention....
-aem

  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-04-2005, 02:35 AM
Rusty
 
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On 31 Mar 2005 16:15:06 -0800, "aem" wrote:



Sorry 'bout that, but it's probably because most people don't spray
cornstarch all over the kitchen. Therefore, Kingsford et al. don't get
a lot of complaints about their packaging. I'm not saying you're
clumsy g but it appears that you don't pay quite enough attention....
-aem


Yea, that's probably why Betty Crocker is offering cornstarch in a
cardboard cylinder with a shaker top. They just didn't take it a step
further and make an opening large enough to fit a measuring tablespoon
into.

Or why Clabber Girl offers it in a steel can with a plastic snap on
top with large letters saying, "Easier to use and store. No Mess!".

http://images.packworld.com/issues/0...ornstarch1.jpg

I must be the only person that ever complained.


Rusty


  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-04-2005, 05:03 AM
aem
 
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Rusty wrote:
[snip]
Clabber Girl offers it in a steel can with a plastic snap on
top with large letters saying, "Easier to use and store. No Mess!".


http://images.packworld.com/issues/0...ornstarch1.jpg

Well, good then, you've found what you need. -aem



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