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Default How to make PRESERVED PICKLED CUCUMBERS - CHINESE RECIPE

Hello Everybody,

I'm writing you from Italy.

I would like to make a jar of PRESERVED PICKLED CUCUMBERS in soy sauce
(I think it's a chinese recipe, you can find it canned in food shops).

The ingredinets are the following:

.. sliced cucumbers
.. soy sauce
.. monosodic glutammate (I think it's optional)
.. salt and sugar (optional)
.. water (optional)

I would like, if somebody knows this recipe, to tell me what are the
quantities and how long the vegetable have to be kept in the soy sauce.
Do I need to boil the cucumbers?
Do I need calcium chloride ?

Thanks,

Luca >

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Cucumbers and Kelp Pickled In Soy Sauce

Kelp goes well in just about any pickle recipe.
This is a very simple one that utilizes the natural salts in kelp and
fermented soy.

Ingredients

12 in. dried kelp
1/4 cup soy sauce
1 medium cucumber

Method

1. Lightly rinse kelp and cut into strips 2 in. x 1/2 in.
2. Wash cucumber thoroughly, cut into 1/2 in. thick rounds.
3. Place kelp strips in a sterilized crock or pickle jar, pour in soy sauce,
then mix in cucumber rounds.
4. Cover and refrigerate at least 24 hours.
5. Replenish the ingredients as they are used; pickling mixture can be used
3-4 times.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------

Cucumbers Phreelee:

Ingredients

3 Cucumbers
5 Chopped green onions
4 large Cloves of garlic
Sesame oil
1/4 cup Soy sauce
1/4 cup White vinegar
1 teaspoon Korean Chile powder -- (Mexican won't do, get from Asian food
shop)

Directions

Slice ends off the cucumbers and rub against the ends to get the bitterness
out. (A white frothy paste will form). Peel cucumbers and slice in about
1/8th inch slices. Add finely chopped garlic and green onions.
Add approximately 1/4 cup soy sauce and 1/4 cup white vinegar with 1
tablespoon sesame oil. Add 1/4 teaspoons Chile powder at a time and add more
for taste. Marinate, chill and serve. Recipe can be doubled easily
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------


PICKLED CUCUMBERS

2 medium cucumbers
1 tablespoon Vietnamese fish sauce
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon canola oil
1/2 teaspoon hot sauce

Peel cucumbers, slice in half lengthwise and remove seeds. Slice cucumbers
thinly and mix with Vietnamese fish sauce, rice wine vinegar, fresh lime
juice, sugar, soy sauce, canola oil and hot sauce.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------

Enjoy
Chef R. W. Miller
Marriott Resorts & Hotels


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article > ,
> wrote:

> Cucumbers and Kelp Pickled In Soy Sauce
>
> Kelp goes well in just about any pickle recipe.
> This is a very simple one that utilizes the natural salts in kelp and
> fermented soy.
>
> Ingredients
>
> 12 in. dried kelp
> 1/4 cup soy sauce
> 1 medium cucumber
>
> Method
>
> 1. Lightly rinse kelp and cut into strips 2 in. x 1/2 in.
> 2. Wash cucumber thoroughly, cut into 1/2 in. thick rounds.
> 3. Place kelp strips in a sterilized crock or pickle jar, pour in soy sauce,
> then mix in cucumber rounds.
> 4. Cover and refrigerate at least 24 hours.
> 5. Replenish the ingredients as they are used; pickling mixture can be used
> 3-4 times.


<snipped>

Thanks for this! :-)
I've been only recently begun to explore kelp...
I made a fabulous seafood soup recently that I used
some very thinly sliced kelp from the asian market in!

It was incredibly good... and I want to experiment with it
further. There are SO many varieties of it available there!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
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Katra wrote:
> > <snipped>

>
> Thanks for this! :-)
> I've been only recently begun to explore kelp...
> I made a fabulous seafood soup recently that I used
> some very thinly sliced kelp from the asian market in!
>
> It was incredibly good... and I want to experiment with it
> further. There are SO many varieties of it available there!


There are hundreds of varieties of seaweed in the great oceanic garden.
The long tubes of bull kelp take well to pickling, though what I've
had is a more conventional salt and vinegar pickling than this soy
sauce recipe. The native peoples of the Pacific Northwest use several
other varieties of kelp in other ways, too. Japanese use different
varieties for sushi and for soup and for seasonings--you could probably
spend a long time learning about all the possibilities. -aem

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
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In article . com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > > <snipped>

> >
> > Thanks for this! :-)
> > I've only recently begun to explore kelp...
> > I made a fabulous seafood soup recently that I used
> > some very thinly sliced kelp from the asian market in!
> >
> > It was incredibly good... and I want to experiment with it
> > further. There are SO many varieties of it available there!

>
> There are hundreds of varieties of seaweed in the great oceanic garden.
> The long tubes of bull kelp take well to pickling, though what I've
> had is a more conventional salt and vinegar pickling than this soy
> sauce recipe. The native peoples of the Pacific Northwest use several
> other varieties of kelp in other ways, too. Japanese use different
> varieties for sushi and for soup and for seasonings--you could probably
> spend a long time learning about all the possibilities. -aem
>


Sounds like a worthwhile study...

My last issue of "Ag-Ventures" talked about sea farming a particular
variety of rare but popular seaweed for high profit. It's a magazine for
niche farming, high profit on small acreage.

Funny that it's all varieties of giant Algae eh? <G>
It's also good for the thyroid.

For now, I'll just have to stick to what is (dried) at the asian market.

I've found that if you ask politely, some of the chinese and vietnamese
women that speak english and shop there are more than happy to answer
the silly question "how is this used"???

I bought a piece of Galangal root recently that is still in the 'frige.
I was told to use it like ginger, and it was used primarily for roast
duck. I have two ducks in the freezer right now. :-d

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dee Randall
 
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>
> I bought a piece of Galangal root recently that is still in the 'frige.
> I was told to use it like ginger, and it was used primarily for roast
> duck. I have two ducks in the freezer right now. :-d
>

Are the in a row? (:-))
Dee


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 26 Mar 2005 06:36:21a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
>>
>> I bought a piece of Galangal root recently that is still in the 'frige.
>> I was told to use it like ginger, and it was used primarily for roast
>> duck. I have two ducks in the freezer right now. :-d
>>

> Are the in a row? (:-))
> Dee


Have you issued the command? "get your..." <g>


--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
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Default



Katra wrote:
>
> In article . com>,
> "aem" > wrote:
>
> > Katra wrote:
> > > > <snipped>
> > >
> > > Thanks for this! :-)
> > > I've only recently begun to explore kelp...
> > > I made a fabulous seafood soup recently that I used
> > > some very thinly sliced kelp from the asian market in!
> > >
> > > It was incredibly good... and I want to experiment with it
> > > further. There are SO many varieties of it available there!

> >
> > There are hundreds of varieties of seaweed in the great oceanic garden.
> > The long tubes of bull kelp take well to pickling, though what I've
> > had is a more conventional salt and vinegar pickling than this soy
> > sauce recipe. The native peoples of the Pacific Northwest use several
> > other varieties of kelp in other ways, too. Japanese use different
> > varieties for sushi and for soup and for seasonings--you could probably
> > spend a long time learning about all the possibilities. -aem
> >

>
> Sounds like a worthwhile study...
>
> My last issue of "Ag-Ventures" talked about sea farming a particular
> variety of rare but popular seaweed for high profit. It's a magazine for
> niche farming, high profit on small acreage.
>
> Funny that it's all varieties of giant Algae eh? <G>
> It's also good for the thyroid.
>
> For now, I'll just have to stick to what is (dried) at the asian market.
>
> I've found that if you ask politely, some of the chinese and vietnamese
> women that speak english and shop there are more than happy to answer
> the silly question "how is this used"???


Often one doesn't even need to ask. Was looking at a jar of Vietnamese
sauce which didn't have any English on it. While I was contemplating the
contents, a Vietnamese woman came up and said that it was used as a
dipping sauce


>

<snip>
>
> Kat



>
> --
> K.
>
> Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
>
> There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada
>
> >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<

>
> http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra

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