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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
AlleyGator
 
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Default OT naturally - home remedies for an earache?

My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
have no idea.
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Thu 24 Mar 2005 05:34:13p, AlleyGator wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.


My mom always used a few drops of warmed "sweet oil" which is olive oil.
It's very comforting.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Andy >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>After swimming we'd get earfulls of hydrogen peroxide to prevent
>swimmer's ear (ache).


Mom always used hydrogen peroxide to remove excess earwax (or sweet
potatoes, as she called it). I wouldn't recommend it for an infected ear,
though. On a healthy ear, it just bubbles and dissolves wax. I think it
would hurt if your ear was infected.

Carol


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >, x-no-archive: yes
wrote:

> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, w(snip)
> For some reason, I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How
> this could help, I have no idea.


Me, neither but SIL's mom used to do it to him and he says it worked.
My mom used sweet oil and heat, I think. When my son had them, I took
him to the doc -- ear infections were his illness of choice as a sprout.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >, Terry Pulliam
Burd > wrote:
(snip)
> This is going to sound absolutely ridiculous,


Nah. Y'think?

> but I know it works: slice an onion in half and heat it in a
> microwave until it's hot enough for the heat to be felt (but not
> burned) through a cloth, such as a washcloth or old rag. Hold it
> against her ear...I cannot recall what gas is released, but it worked
> on my kids when they were small.


>
> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
> AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


Do you dress that with oil and vinegar? <g> And where'd YOU learn the
onion trick? From the family surgeon?
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article >, x-no-archive: yes
> wrote:
>
>
>>My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
>>has an earache, w(snip)
>>For some reason, I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How
>>this could help, I have no idea.

>
>
> Me, neither but SIL's mom used to do it to him and he says it worked.
> My mom used sweet oil and heat, I think. When my son had them, I took
> him to the doc -- ear infections were his illness of choice as a sprout.



My kids, too, at least once or twice a winter from
birth to about age 10. If it wasn't ears, it was
bronchitis. Amoxycillin was familiarly known as
"The Pink Stuff" in our household. I can only
remember once that they were given numbing ear
drops as well as the antibiotic.

gloria p
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bell Jar
 
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I hope by now it has calmed down ear pain is no fun
There are numbing drops that your doc can call in. My 2 year old just went
thru a bout of ear infections. She is an amazing baby ... only cries when
she is hurting. She SCREAMED for 14 hours.
3 min after putting the numbing drops in her ear ... she was fine. She also
took an antibiotic.
If your DD ears are extremely painful take her to the ER, ears are nothing
to mess with, she could have permeant hearing loss due to an infection that
goes untreated or if there is a delay in treatment. I know I do.


"AlleyGator" > wrote in message
...
> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.



  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ted Campanelli
 
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Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
so great) words of knowledge:

> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.


I remember having some ear infections as a kid and my folks blowing
smoke in my ear. My late mother (who was an RN) told me that the heat
from the smoke helped soften the wax buildup and the nicotine in the
smoke acted as an anesthetic to help relieve the pain.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dimitri
 
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"AlleyGator" > wrote in message
...
> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.


I am sure you're on the way to a doctor by now -

Many years ago we were coming back from a vacation and one of the girls
(very little) had an ear ache. She was in so much pain that she was just
writhing. At that time Sunday night there were just no 24 hour pharmacies
within a reasonable distance. We managed to get the on-call physician and
he asked us what we had in the cupboard (Medicines) As it turned out we had
come prescription cough syrup containing a small amount of codeine. A few
Tablespoons later (I don't remember the exact dose) and a few minutes she
was asleep. By the morning the drum had popped and we were able to get her
to the doctors without any pain.

Dimitri


Dimitri.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
--
 
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"Terry Pulliam Burd" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 00:34:13 GMT,
> (AlleyGator) wrote:
>
> >My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> >has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> >kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> >Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> >gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> >Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> >just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> >you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> >Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> >I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> >have no idea.

>
> This is going to sound absolutely ridiculous, but I know it works:
> slice an onion in half and heat it in a microwave until it's hot
> enough for the heat to be felt (but not burned) through a cloth, such
> as a washcloth or old rag. Hold it against her ear...I cannot recall
> what gas is released, but it worked on my kids when they were small.


Many ear aches are caused by blockage of the eustachian tube, which runs
from the ear and drains into the throat.
I forget the exact name of the chemical in the onion that causes fluid to
be created in epithelial tissue, but heating it would definitely release
more and increase its activity.
Actually, it makes perfect sense if the earache is from a plugged
eustachian tube.

>
> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
> AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA
>
>
> "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
> old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
> waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
>
> -- Duncan Hines
>
> To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"



  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
--
 
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"AlleyGator" > wrote in message
...
> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.


cigarette possibility below -

ear aches are most often caused by blockages of the inner tube (Eustachian)
from the ear to the throat, or of the ear canal which comes form outside and
stops at the eardrum, or because of infection.

classic treatments are
drink lots of water/Gatorade (this is from the pediatric med group -
apparently water works very rapidly and quite well in children),
gargle with salt water,
take anti-inflammatory and anti-histamines to reduce swelling ,
heat pack the affected ear, especially the bone behind the ear,
lay bad-ear up,
and if the docs says, take anti-biotics and follow his advice on
anti-histamines if taking anti-biotics.

1) IF -IF -it is a plugged Eustachian tube (from thick mucous in the tube,
swelling of the lining, swelling in the throat at the tube exit, or mucous
trapped by swelling, etc. in the internal tube that equalizes pressure) the
idea is to get blood flowing and secretions up, so that the "plug" attached
to the surface of the tube will loosen and more fluid is secreted, and the
edges will be absorbed so pressure can be equalized- thus the warm cloth and
the lying so the bad ear is up.
And thus the use of anti-inflammatories and anti-histamines to reduce
swelling.

2) An oddity if it is an infection, however, is that the anti-biotics
necessary to protect the ear from that infection will often cause slightly
more swelling at the site of the infection in the first 24 hours (sometimes
it's a byproduct of their work).

3) If the ear canal is blocked externally by wax and/or things mixed in the
wax like soap, and the pressure from air trapped there cannot neutralize -
the sweet oil softens the wax ball so it can pass air and later be washed
out.

As to the use of cigarette smoke -
If someone forced heated water vapor containing tar laced with nicotine
onto your ear, chances are the blood might start flowing in the attacked
area.

Blood flow usually equals relief.

And I have heard that blowing in the ear can reduce blood pressure - making
tissues more pliable and thus less resistant to fluid pressure differentials
that are causing the pain.
No bets, however.

fwiw - hope it helps


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Victor Sack
 
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AlleyGator > wrote:

> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine. That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.


The first rule in such cases is not to post asking for a medical advice
in a Usenet newsgroup. You have no idea of the qualifications, or lack
thereof, of the advice-givers. This applies to what follows, too. Go
to a doctor instead, or, if none is available, to an ER of your local
hospital.

That said, and assuming it is otitis media (just because it is fairly
common), some kind of penicillin is usually indicated. What kind of
antibiotic did you get? Antibiotics should never be prescribed by
anyone but a doctor. Also, nose drops (something with xylometazoline or
similar) can be helpful. Ibuprofen can be helpful, too, as can that
heating pad (over the ear, not just on the head). Never put anything
*in* the ear, as long as you are not sure there is no perforation of the
ear drum.

ObFood: Baked tomatoes with parsley and garlic, from _The Cuisine of the
Sun_ by Mireille Johnston.

Victor

Tomates Provençale
Baked Tomatoes with Parsley and Garlic

Most _tomates provençale- served in American restaurants are burnt on
the outside and watery and soggy on the inside. In Provence they are
prepared quite differently. In the traditional recipe the tomatoes are
cooked on top of the stove _before being baked_, so that all their
excess water is cooked away and they must look like a _vitrail_
(stained glass window). This dish is sometimes eaten cold in Nice, but
I prefer it warm.

For 6 people:

6 firm tomatoes, cut in half
3 tablespoons olive oil
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup bread crumbs (preferably home-made)
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup minced parsley

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Put the tomato halves upside down on paper towels and drain the excess
juice.

Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large frying pan. Add the
tomato halves and cook them - six halves at a time - cut side down for 5
minutes over a medium flame. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and
carefully turn them over with a spatula. Cook for 3 minutes, then
delicately remove the tomatoes with a spatula and put into an oiled
baking dish. This can be done in advance to this point.

Just before serving, sprinkle the tomatoes with bread crumbs, salt,
pepper, and 1 1/2 tablespoons of the olive oil and bake for 10 minutes.
Sprinkle with garlic and parsley and serve immediately.

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gabby
 
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"AlleyGator" > wrote in message
...
> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache,

(snippage)
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.


I remember only one earache as a child, and mom did blow smoke in my ear. I
can only assume they thought it was warm and would be soothing. Don't
remember that it helped any. I also assume that it was otitis media
(middle ear infection) because I don't remember being in incredible pain.
OTOH, I experienced otitis externa (swimmer's ear) about 5 years ago, and
I'd sooner have another baby than experience that again. The pain was
excruciating, I could barely swallow without crying so eating was out of the
question. Even talking was painful. After about 36 hours on antibiotics
(drops and oral) the pain subsided and things went back to normal.

Gabby




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Terry Pulliam Burd
 
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 20:30:20 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
> wrote:

>In article >, Terry Pulliam
>Burd > wrote:
>(snip)
>> This is going to sound absolutely ridiculous,

>
>Nah. Y'think?
>
>> but I know it works: slice an onion in half and heat it in a
>> microwave until it's hot enough for the heat to be felt (but not
>> burned) through a cloth, such as a washcloth or old rag. Hold it
>> against her ear...I cannot recall what gas is released, but it worked
>> on my kids when they were small.


>Do you dress that with oil and vinegar? <g> And where'd YOU learn the
>onion trick? From the family surgeon?


HA! Not likely! No, this came to me from the family surgeon's wife,
the MIL, who was a nurse and had some way cool and nifty natural home
remedies.

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


"If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

-- Duncan Hines

To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Goomba38
 
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Gabby wrote:


> I remember only one earache as a child, and mom did blow smoke in my ear. I
> can only assume they thought it was warm and would be soothing. Don't
> remember that it helped any. I also assume that it was otitis media
> (middle ear infection) because I don't remember being in incredible pain.
> OTOH, I experienced otitis externa (swimmer's ear) about 5 years ago, and
> I'd sooner have another baby than experience that again. The pain was
> excruciating, I could barely swallow without crying so eating was out of the
> question. Even talking was painful. After about 36 hours on antibiotics
> (drops and oral) the pain subsided and things went back to normal.
>
> Gabby
>


As an adult I was hospitalized for *seven* days
with Otitis Externa (swimmers ear!) that was so
bad ...well... lets just say I've given birth
naturally and it didn't hurt near as much as that
ear did. The daily lavages did me in. Thank god
for Demerol. Lordie the memory still scares me.
Goomba

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Bob (this one)
 
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AlleyGator wrote:

> My daughter is in her mid-teens, and has tears in her eyes because she
> has an earache, which I don't even remember her ever having as alittle
> kid. She's almost never sick, so she doesn't handle this stuff well.
> Since the doctors are all closed, a friend who is a nurse-practitioner
> gave us a 3-day regimen of some antibiotic and the wife went to
> Walgreens to get something they call "sweet oil" which I figure is
> just glycerine.


Sweet oil is olive oil. It ostensibly serves two purposes if warmed and
dropped into the ear canal: it warms the tissues so there's a bit of
vasodilation to speed the operation of immune functions and it softens
earwax in case it's part of the problem.

Having said that, any oil you find in your kitchen should do about the
same thing. My grandmother used to put drops of warm oil in my ears in
the winter to forestall earaches. Mostly it made my earmuffs greasy.
IIRC, it was slightly above body temp - like baby-bottle warm; maybe
105°F or so.

> That, plus a dose of ibuprofen, I figure is the best
> you can do. And the ole' heating pad on the head, of course.
> Honestly, I don't ever remember having this myself. For some reason,
> I think they used to blow smoke in your ear. How this could help, I
> have no idea.


You can still find "ear candles" that are burned in or around ears that
they say draws out ear wax and supposedly does something else
(unspecified) good for the ears and even the whole head. Like those ads
that say their products "promote leg health" or "support immune
systems." <http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/candling.html>

Pastorio
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AlleyGator
 
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Terry Pulliam Burd > wrote:
>HA! Not likely! No, this came to me from the family surgeon's wife,
>the MIL, who was a nurse and had some way cool and nifty natural home
>remedies.

This the main reason I posed the question - the ache is better as of
today. I just wanted to see some of the good common-sense, but weird
sounding stuff that this gang come up with. I seem to remember a lot
of strange but useful remedies mentioned. Home remedies, plus a lot
of unusual uses for everyday stuff. Sometimes I think our
grandparents (and older) had a lot of good knowledge that many, like
me, would like to get back. BTW, these suggestions will be pulled
back out of the hat if the problem ever comes up again.
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