General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Me
 
Posts: n/a
Default Taco Seasoning...


please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..
I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a typical
package mix. Please help! Thank you group...

Kevin Miller
Ft Wayne, IN
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dennis Turner
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 3/22/2005 7:57 PM or thereabouts, Me appears, somewhat unbelievably,
to have opined:

> please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..
> I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a typical
> package mix. Please help! Thank you group...
>
> Kevin Miller
> Ft Wayne, IN




I don't know how authentic it is, but I use diced tomatoes, chopped
jalapeno, a clove or 2 of garlic, chili powder, and finely chopped
onion. I brown the beef first, then add the seasonings along with about
a cup of water and let it all simmer for about half an hour. Makes
mighty tasty tacos.

--
I sent ten puns to all my friends hoping that at least one
would make them laugh.
Sadly, no pun in ten did.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Me wrote:

> please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..
> I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a typical
> package mix. Please help! Thank you group...


I fry some ground beef and when there enough rendered fat I add some diced
onion and minced garlic. Once the onions are cooked I add some cumin,
chilli powder, salt, pepper, dried chilli flakes, a bit of cinnamon, a bit
of sugar, some vinegar (enough to balance the sugar) and about a
Tablespoon of tomato puree.

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Faux_Pseudo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

_.-In rec.food.cooking, Me wrote the following -._
>
> please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..
> I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a typical
> package mix. Please help! Thank you group...


I have yet to go to a authentic Mexican place that uses 'taco
seasoning'.

Common things that are used are the following in any number of simple
recipes.

Red Pepper
Black Pepper
Salt
Lemon Juice
Lime Juice
Vinegar
Sugar
Cilantro
Onion
Garlic
Tomato
Scallions
Water
Nopales
Chillies
Cumin
Italian Seasoning (Oregano, Thyme, Basil, Red Peper)
Bell peppers

Take at most 4 of the above and mix in whatever quantities seems
appropriate and cook, serve cold or apply to cooking food.

Search for recipes for the following:
Al Pastor
Carne Asada
Carnitas
Birria
Chorizo (Good for breakfast with eggs)
Abodaba (Sometimes the same as al pastor and sometime /very/ different
but try it. You begin to appricaite it in all its forms)

I only use 'taco seasoning' when I am looking for something distinctly
American.

'taco seasoning' is like 'spaghetti sauce': Something you put on
meat or pasta respectivly. It can be thick or thing, it can be spicy,
tangy or bland. It is what you make of it.

Here I am stuck in Virginia where every damn place wants to use ground
beef in its tacos and uses 'taco seasoning'. If I wanted that I would
go to Taco Bell. Most places to have Carne Asada but it isn't as good
as the stuff in San Diego.

I have found one taco shop here though. They don't speak English and
the menu is Al Pastor, Carne Asada and your choice of taco or torta.
For drink they have beer or horchata. A very good start but at $2 for
a taco[0] it is only a once and a while thing.

[0] TJ sized taco. A tortilla roughly 4 inches in diamiter.

--
.-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Me wrote:
> please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning

recipe..
> I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a

typical
> package mix. Please help! Thank you group...
>

"Authentic" doesn't really mean anything in this context. Go to a
taquer=EDa in Mexico and there will be several kinds of fillings for
tacos: carne asada, lengua, al pastor, carnitas, etc. Each cooked and
seasoned differently, of course.

If you're going to fry some hamburger and want to give it Mexican type
flavors, this would get you close, after which keep experimenting until
you like it:

1 lb. ground beef
1/2 medium white onion, chopped
2 small jalape=F1o peppers, minced
1 large clove garlic, minced
1 tsp. ground comino (cumin)
2 tsp. chili powder

You could also use tinned roast beef, by shredding the beef, cooking
the onion and above seasonings, then stirring in the beef. -aem



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Faux_Pseudo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

_.-In rec.food.cooking, aem wrote the following -._
> "Authentic" doesn't really mean anything in this context. Go to a
> taquería in Mexico and there will be several kinds of fillings for
> tacos: carne asada, lengua, al pastor, carnitas, etc. Each cooked and
> seasoned differently, of course.


Which is what I was /trying/ to say in my post. I think you did a
better job tough.

> 1 lb. ground beef
> 1/2 medium white onion, chopped
> 2 small jalapeño peppers, minced
> 1 large clove garlic, minced
> 1 tsp. ground comino (cumin)
> 2 tsp. chili powder
>
> You could also use tinned roast beef, by shredding the beef, cooking
> the onion and above seasonings, then stirring in the beef. -aem


That is the only time I use precooked beef. Saves a lot of time and
has tastie results.

And if you can find it "Pork" is really good too. One lb cans were
available from the US .gov as handouts but I haven't seen it in 7
years. It has the blue stripe of quality that lets you know it goes
good with "Cheese".

--
.-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kevin Miller wrote from Fort Wayne, IN:

> please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..
> I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a typical
> package mix. Please help! Thank you group...


Here's the most authentic recipe I've seen. It's from a now-defunct site
called "Taqueria Tech." I mourn its passing, but I was lucky enough to
capture all the recipes before it went away:

Shredded Beef
The first thing I do when trying a new Mexican restaurant is ask if the
quesadillas are made with flour tortillas and if the tacos are made with
shredded beef. If the answer to either is "no", I am immediately suspect of
the nature of the food. A "yes" reply does not mean that you can immediately
verify the nationality of the cook. However, it is a general clue that
usually indicates that you may order with confidence. My recipe for shredded
beef was discovered by pure accident and I thought I had stumbled across an
ancient Aztec secret. Only quite recently I have learned that, in Mexico, it
is very common to cook with pickled vegies. This method may, at first, seem
a bit unorthodox, but it yields a spicy beef which is perfect for tacos,
enchiladas, burritos, tamales, or even as a cold snack! The pureed extra
vegies are the essence of one version of enchilada sauce, and may be used
with the meat to make great 'ladas or frozen for use another day. This
recipe makes about 20 large tacos. To make more, increase all the
ingredients in equal proportions.

2 1/2 lbs. rump or any other beef cut
6 oz beer [drink the rest]
6 oz Coke
1 11 1/2 oz jar of hot garden vegetables
or
1 1/2 cups of homemade pickled vegetables [verduras escabeche]
with 1/2 cups of the pickling liquid
3 or 4 dried California or pasilla chilies
1 peeled orange [optional]
1/2 Tbsp. California chili powder
1/8 tsp cumino
1/8 tsp oregano
4 [or more] crushed garlic cloves
Don't be afraid to use fatty meat. Since it will be cooked beyond
recognition, the fat can be removed later and will add to the flavor and
texture while it cooks. Prepare the chilies by roasting them over an open
flame or on a grill, just until they begin to brown. Then soak them,
completely covered in hot water, for about 20 minutes or until they are soft
and pliable. When they are ready, gently slit them down one side, rinse out
the seeds, and lay them flat open on a paper towel. Don't rub your eyes as
your hands are now lethal weapons! Cut the beef into quarters [not too small
or they will be difficult to shred] and put all the stuff in a large pot and
stir it up. The orange adds a definite sweetness which you may or not want.
If you like it and are ever stuck for an orange use 1/2 cup of orange juice.
This combination creates a very spicy filling which probably will not call
for extra salsa if used in tacos. You can cut back on the bite by
eliminating the dry spices. Add enough beer or water to just barely cover
the surface of the meat. Lay the soft chilies over the top of the meat
chunks and bring the pot to a rapid boil. Tightly cover the pot, lower the
heat and simmer about 2 hours. If you are planning other dishes for the
menu, you can work on them while the beef is cooking. Preheat the oven to
350o. Remove the cooked meat and place it on a large cookie sheet, reserving
the liquid and vegetables. With two forks shred the meat and arranged it
neatly on the sheet so it will bake evenly. Ladle some of the cooking liquid
onto the tray and place it in the oven. Bake the meat, turning it once, for
about 1/2 hour. Keep an eye on it so it doesn't burn. The sugar in the Coke
will serve to gently brown the meat and make it slightly crisp. In the
meantime, continue with the preparation of the final cooking liquid. Strain
and reserve the cooking liquid from the vegies. Remove the orange and
peppers [these are usually jalapeños, and you can leave them in if you want
a rosy red mañana]. Puree the vegies with a bit of the liquid and then
return 1/2 of the puree back into the remaining liquid. Save the remaining
1/2 puree for enchilada sauce. When the meat is a deep brown, return it to
the liquid/puree mixture and cook it down until it is almost dry. Keep a bit
of the juice which makes the meat easier to reheat. Keep the shredded beef
covered in a warm oven until it is ready to use for whatever you what. The
exception is enchiladas. Since the enchiladas have to be cooked anyway, it
is best to let the beef cool before you try to handle it for stuffing the
tortillas.

Verduras Escabeche
If you prefer to custom design your own pickled vegetables you will
instantly become a master of verduras escabeche, which translates to
"pickled vegetables." Now, knowing this does not yet make you a master. What
elevates you to master status is the type and number of chilies you use--
and if you really leave them in while cooking the meat. It is exactly for
this reason that I suggest you try making your own at least once. The basic
advantage for me is that commercial brands do not include the red pasilla or
New Mexico chilies. If you pickled them with the mix they add more to the
flavor and can be left out of the rest of the recipe if you wish. The
process is to cook any choice of pickles, vegetables and chilies with
distilled vinegar. Seal them in a jar and let it sit as long as you wish.
The amount of each ingredient is dependent on your preference and the size
of seal jar you have. My choice of ingredients a
1/4 inch slices of carrots
1/4 inch slices of dill pickles
1/2 inch slices of cauliflower
large slices of white onion
New Mexico and or pasilla chilies
whole jalepeno or serano chilies
bay leaf
white vinegar
Slice open the red chilies and gently remove the seeds and veins. Take care
not to rip or shred the peppers at this point. Place all the ingredients in
a pot and add enough vinegar to half cover. Bring the vinegar to a boil and
then simmer for about 15 minutes. Let the mixture cool and then place it all
in a air-tight, sealed jar. If the vegies are not completely covered, add
more vinegar.



Bob


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Becca
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I cook the ground beef with chopped onion. I add chili powder, cumin,
paprika, cayenne, salt, pepper and a little water water. I let it
simmer for 15 minutes or so.

Becca
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob wrote:
> Kevin Miller wrote from Fort Wayne, IN:
>
>
>>please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..
>>I've tried many off the 'net but they ALL seem to taste like a typical
>>package mix. Please help! Thank you group...

>
>
> Here's the most authentic recipe I've seen. It's from a now-defunct site
> called "Taqueria Tech." I mourn its passing, but I was lucky enough to
> capture all the recipes before it went away:
>
> Shredded Beef
> The first thing I do when trying a new Mexican restaurant is ask if the
> quesadillas are made with flour tortillas and if the tacos are made with
> shredded beef. If the answer to either is "no", I am immediately suspect of
> the nature of the food. A "yes" reply does not mean that you can immediately
> verify the nationality of the cook. However, it is a general clue that
> usually indicates that you may order with confidence. My recipe for shredded
> beef was discovered by pure accident and I thought I had stumbled across an
> ancient Aztec secret. Only quite recently I have learned that, in Mexico, it
> is very common to cook with pickled vegies. This method may, at first, seem
> a bit unorthodox, but it yields a spicy beef which is perfect for tacos,
> enchiladas, burritos, tamales, or even as a cold snack! The pureed extra
> vegies are the essence of one version of enchilada sauce, and may be used
> with the meat to make great 'ladas or frozen for use another day. This
> recipe makes about 20 large tacos. To make more, increase all the
> ingredients in equal proportions.
>
> 2 1/2 lbs. rump or any other beef cut
> 6 oz beer [drink the rest]
> 6 oz Coke
> 1 11 1/2 oz jar of hot garden vegetables



And pray tell, what were the natives using for their authentic tacos
before the advent of coca-cola? That should be a clue relative to
authenticity.


jim
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

JimLane wrote:

> And pray tell, what were the natives using for their authentic tacos
> before the advent of coca-cola? That should be a clue relative to
> authenticity.


Depends on what you call authentic. Are you looking for the way things taste
at taquerias NOW? If modern taquerias use cola, then you've attained
authenticity, regardless of the modern nature of the ingredients. If that's
how you define authenticity, then use the Coke. If you're looking for the
DIFFERENT TASTE of bygone days, then you'll have to search elsewhere.

There's a difference between "authentic" and "historically accurate."

Bob




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Monsur Fromage du Pollet
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dog3 > wrote in
1:

> Becca > wrote in
> :
>
> > I cook the ground beef with chopped onion. I add chili powder,
> > cumin, paprika, cayenne, salt, pepper and a little water water. I
> > let it simmer for 15 minutes or so.
> >
> > Becca

>
> This sounds good too. I'll try the paprika next time. What type do
> you use?
>
> Michael
>


Where's the garlic?

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
Continuing to be Manitoban
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Faux_Pseudo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

_.-In rec.food.cooking, Faux_Pseudo wrote the following -._
> Common things that are used are the following in any number of simple
> recipes.
>
> Red Pepper
> Black Pepper
> Salt
> Lemon Juice
> Lime Juice
> Vinegar
> Sugar
> Cilantro
> Onion
> Garlic
> Tomato
> Scallions
> Water
> Nopales
> Chillies
> Cumin
> Italian Seasoning (Oregano, Thyme, Basil, Red Peper)
> Bell peppers


I can't belive I forgot some key items:

Tequila
Beer

>
> Take at most 4 of the above and mix in whatever quantities seems
> appropriate and cook, serve cold or apply to cooking food.


There was a post on /. the other day...
<url:http://books.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=143298&cid=12015764>

One of the parts that stood out and is on topic for this group:

My very favorite recipe book is a
tiny little thing of about 40 pages.
For each kind of meat and each kind
of vegetable, it lists what spices
and sauces go well with it, how long
and how hot to cook it, and how to
tell when it is done. There is a
little section on how to make about a
dozen differnet sauces. That's it.

Does anyone know of a referance like this? One
that is in html and could easily be put on a Plam
Pilot would be even better.

--
.-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dan Abel
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >, Me
> wrote:

> please help.. I'm looking for a VERY authentic taco seasoning recipe..



I assume you are talking about something you add to ground beef. As
others have posted, you can drop the "authentic" and especially the "VERY
authentic". Mexicans don't cook with ground beef, unless they are cooking
for gringos.

We like ground beef tacos at home. After the beef has browned, I
generally throw in some of the diced tomatoes and onions that were
intended to go in the tacos, in the meat. I add a little water and
cover. Sometimes I put in taco sauce, salsa or chili powder.

I used to go to a little Mexican hole in the wall. The kitchen was on the
other side of the counter that you ordered at. I watch them cook ground
beef a couple of times. They took a pot of boiling water and dropped a
five pound chunk of frozen ground beef in it. They broke it up as it
thawed and cooked. That was it. No seasoning, no nothing.

--
Dan Abel
Sonoma State University
AIS

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob wrote:
> JimLane wrote:
>
>
>>And pray tell, what were the natives using for their authentic tacos
>>before the advent of coca-cola? That should be a clue relative to
>>authenticity.

>
>
> Depends on what you call authentic. Are you looking for the way things taste
> at taquerias NOW? If modern taquerias use cola, then you've attained
> authenticity, regardless of the modern nature of the ingredients. If that's
> how you define authenticity, then use the Coke. If you're looking for the
> DIFFERENT TASTE of bygone days, then you'll have to search elsewhere.
>
> There's a difference between "authentic" and "historically accurate."
>
> Bob
>
>


Hmmm, tacos are Mexican by origin. Authentic means of undisputed origin
(among its many definitions) and coke is US, so a taco with coke is not
Mexican nor a taco nor authentic.

My point of view based on a common definition.


jim
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

JimLane wrote:

>> There's a difference between "authentic" and "historically accurate."

>
> Hmmm, tacos are Mexican by origin. Authentic means of undisputed origin
> (among its many definitions) and coke is US, so a taco with coke is not
> Mexican nor a taco nor authentic.
>
> My point of view based on a common definition.


So you're saying (for example) that since chiles were not native to Hungary,
anything with paprika can't possibly be authentically Hungarian?

Not all foods have an undisputed origin. Cesar Salad, Fettuccine Alfredo,
Peach Melba, Pavlova... the origin of all those is clearly defined, and
there are others, I'm not sure that tacos as we know them really have that
same distinction.

(Moreover, Coca-Cola is FAR from a strictly-US product.)

But I can see that we're not going to come to any agreement on this; all I
did was quote a good recipe for shredded beef for tacos. I have no interest
in debating the definition or merits of authenticity.

Bob




  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Faux_Pseudo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

_.-In rec.food.cooking, Bob wrote the following -._
> But I can see that we're not going to come to any agreement on this; all I
> did was quote a good recipe for shredded beef for tacos. I have no interest
> in debating the definition or merits of authenticity.


According to his ideal then Italians couldn't have pasta with tomato
sauce because neither of those originated in Italy.
I agree with you, if it has coke in it it can be authentic Mexican.

Authentic isn't about 'originated' from an area it is 'naturalized' in
an area.

--
.-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Becca
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dog3 wrote:

> This sounds good too. I'll try the paprika next time. What type do you use?
>
> Michael


I bought it at Penzey's, but I have tried others that were good.

Becca

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob wrote:
> JimLane wrote:
>
>
>>>There's a difference between "authentic" and "historically accurate."

>>
>>Hmmm, tacos are Mexican by origin. Authentic means of undisputed origin
>>(among its many definitions) and coke is US, so a taco with coke is not
>>Mexican nor a taco nor authentic.
>>
>>My point of view based on a common definition.

>
>

I'm not sure that tacos as we know them really have that
> same distinction.


That IS your operative phrase.


jim
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Faux_Pseudo wrote:
> _.-In rec.food.cooking, Bob wrote the following -._
>
>>But I can see that we're not going to come to any agreement on this; all I
>>did was quote a good recipe for shredded beef for tacos. I have no interest
>>in debating the definition or merits of authenticity.

>
>
> According to his ideal then Italians couldn't have pasta with tomato
> sauce because neither of those originated in Italy.
> I agree with you, if it has coke in it it can be authentic Mexican.
>
> Authentic isn't about 'originated' from an area it is 'naturalized' in
> an area.
>


Argue with the dictionary. Personal opinions are like a++holes, everyone
has one.


jim
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Faux_Pseudo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

_.-In rec.food.cooking, JimLane wrote the following -._
> Faux_Pseudo wrote:
>> _.-In rec.food.cooking, Bob wrote the following -._
>>
>>>But I can see that we're not going to come to any agreement on this; all I
>>>did was quote a good recipe for shredded beef for tacos. I have no interest
>>>in debating the definition or merits of authenticity.

>>
>>
>> According to his ideal then Italians couldn't have pasta with tomato
>> sauce because neither of those originated in Italy.
>> I agree with you, if it has coke in it it can be authentic Mexican.
>>
>> Authentic isn't about 'originated' from an area it is 'naturalized' in
>> an area.
>>

>
> Argue with the dictionary. Personal opinions are like a++holes, everyone
> has one.


So offer your asshole^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H opinion on this:
Is pasta with tomato sauce 'authentic' Italian?
Is broccoli beef authentic Chinese?

--
.-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Faux_Pseudo wrote:
> _.-In rec.food.cooking, JimLane wrote the following -._
>
>>Faux_Pseudo wrote:
>>
>>>_.-In rec.food.cooking, Bob wrote the following -._
>>>
>>>
>>>>But I can see that we're not going to come to any agreement on this; all I
>>>>did was quote a good recipe for shredded beef for tacos. I have no interest
>>>>in debating the definition or merits of authenticity.
>>>
>>>
>>>According to his ideal then Italians couldn't have pasta with tomato
>>>sauce because neither of those originated in Italy.
>>>I agree with you, if it has coke in it it can be authentic Mexican.
>>>
>>>Authentic isn't about 'originated' from an area it is 'naturalized' in
>>>an area.
>>>

>>
>>Argue with the dictionary. Personal opinions are like a++holes, everyone
>>has one.

>
>
> So offer your asshole^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H opinion on this:
> Is pasta with tomato sauce 'authentic' Italian?
> Is broccoli beef authentic Chinese?
>



Go argue with the dictionary, fool.


jim
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Faux_Pseudo
 
Posts: n/a
Default

_.-In rec.food.cooking, JimLane wrote the following -._
>> So offer your asshole^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H opinion on this:
>> Is pasta with tomato sauce 'authentic' Italian?
>> Is broccoli beef authentic Chinese?
>>

> Go argue with the dictionary, fool.


Even Sheldon would take the time to answer a yes or no question with
something other than an ad-hominem. Thanks for proving Bob's and my
point. Something can be authentic and include a non-native ingredient.

--
.-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dan Abel
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >, JimLane
> wrote:

> Faux_Pseudo wrote:
> > _.-In rec.food.cooking, JimLane wrote the following -._




> >>Argue with the dictionary. Personal opinions are like a++holes, everyone
> >>has one.



> > So offer your asshole^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H opinion on this:
> > Is pasta with tomato sauce 'authentic' Italian?
> > Is broccoli beef authentic Chinese?



> Go argue with the dictionary, fool.



From my American Heritage online dictionary, authentic is defined as:

1. Conforming to fact and therefore worthy of trust, reliance, or belief:
an authentic account by an eyewitness. 2. Having a claimed and verifiable
origin or authorship; not counterfeit or copied: an authentic medieval
sword. 3. Law Executed with due process: an authentic deed.

I chopped off definitions #4 and #5, since one was about music and one was
obsolete.

Which one of these definitions apply, and how does it apply?

I find it amusing that those who count on the dictionary for support often
assume what is in it without checking. I often find that the dictionary
doesn't support those who cite it.

--
Dan Abel
Sonoma State University
AIS

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dan Abel wrote:
> In article >, JimLane
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Faux_Pseudo wrote:
>>
>>>_.-In rec.food.cooking, JimLane wrote the following -._

>
>
>
>
>>>>Argue with the dictionary. Personal opinions are like a++holes, everyone
>>>>has one.

>
>
>
>>>So offer your asshole^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H opinion on this:
>>>Is pasta with tomato sauce 'authentic' Italian?
>>>Is broccoli beef authentic Chinese?

>
>
>
>>Go argue with the dictionary, fool.

>
>
>
> From my American Heritage online dictionary, authentic is defined as:
>
> 1. Conforming to fact and therefore worthy of trust, reliance, or belief:
> an authentic account by an eyewitness. 2. Having a claimed and verifiable
> origin or authorship; not counterfeit or copied: an authentic medieval
> sword. 3. Law Executed with due process: an authentic deed.
>
> I chopped off definitions #4 and #5, since one was about music and one was
> obsolete.
>
> Which one of these definitions apply, and how does it apply?
>
> I find it amusing that those who count on the dictionary for support often
> assume what is in it without checking. I often find that the dictionary
> doesn't support those who cite it.
>


I posted a definition above from the RD Oxford. Find it? Then argue with
it like the other moron.


jim
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Taco Seasoning Julie Bove[_2_] Diabetic 10 29-09-2012 10:40 AM
Taco Seasoning Mix Janet Wilder[_1_] Recipes (moderated) 0 27-08-2008 03:16 AM
taco seasoning Morris General Cooking 18 08-10-2006 04:21 AM
REQ - taco seasoning mix Dieter Zakas General Cooking 27 15-01-2006 11:43 AM
Homemade Taco Seasoning Mix luckytrim Recipes (moderated) 0 07-01-2004 01:25 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:41 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"