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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
R Hobson
 
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Default Best way to use up a bunch of mushrooms?

We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?

Thanks in advance.
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jessica V.
 
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R Hobson wrote:
> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>
> Thanks in advance.


The mushroom struddel recipe in the Moosewood Cookbook is delish and
uses a pound of mushrooms. If you don't have the cookbook you can find
the recipe in a google search. I use butter rather that OO on the filo
and forgo the sesame seeds.

Jessuca
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Dwayne
 
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I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
pressure canner.

Dwayne

"Jessica V." > wrote in message
...
>R Hobson wrote:
>> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
>> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
>> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>>
>> Thanks in advance.

>
> The mushroom struddel recipe in the Moosewood Cookbook is delish and uses
> a pound of mushrooms. If you don't have the cookbook you can find the
> recipe in a google search. I use butter rather that OO on the filo and
> forgo the sesame seeds.
>
> Jessuca




  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bea Esser
 
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Make a basic mushroom duxelle with them. Finely chop and sautee with
some shallots, butter and white wine. Don't add any major seasonings so
they go farther later on. Freeze in small ziplocks and use to flavor
soups, sauces, and stews. As well as pastas.

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >, R Hobson >
wrote:

> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>
> Thanks in advance.


Cream of mushroom soup!
That can be frozen... :-)

--
K.

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There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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Katra
 
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Dwayne,

How do you can mushrooms?

I generally just dry them?


In article >,
"Dwayne" > wrote:

> I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
> sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
> pressure canner.
>
> Dwayne
>
> "Jessica V." > wrote in message
> ...
> >R Hobson wrote:
> >> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> >> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> >> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance.

> >
> > The mushroom struddel recipe in the Moosewood Cookbook is delish and uses
> > a pound of mushrooms. If you don't have the cookbook you can find the
> > recipe in a google search. I use butter rather that OO on the filo and
> > forgo the sesame seeds.
> >
> > Jessuca

>
>
>


--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jude
 
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make yourself a pan of Stroganoff.

Or else try this pasta sauce:
Chop 1 lb mushrooms.
Add to saucepan along with 3 chopped shallots, 2 cloves garlic, 1 c
half and half. Simmer for about 45 minutes to infuse with flavor.
Puree half of the sauce, leave the other half chunky.
Pour over pasta and top with asiago cheese.

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Serendipity
 
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R Hobson wrote:

> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>
> Thanks in advance.


Mushrooms freeze well. If they are larger mushrooms, stuffed mushrooms
are good. You can always add them to meatloaf or make cream of mushroom
soup. My favourite way is sauteed.
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Dwayne wrote:

> I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
> sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
> pressure canner.


I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working on
cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
with the beef burgundy. Even the garbage disposal didn't want either!


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Katra wrote:

> Dwayne,
>
> How do you can mushrooms?


I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
lbs pressure. HTH

Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
pint jars for my canner.
>
> I generally just dry them?
>
>
> In article >,
> "Dwayne" > wrote:
>
>
>>I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
>>sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
>>pressure canner.
>>
>>Dwayne
>>
>>"Jessica V." > wrote in message
...
>>
>>>R Hobson wrote:
>>>
>>>>We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
>>>>next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
>>>>suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>>>>
>>>>Thanks in advance.
>>>
>>>The mushroom struddel recipe in the Moosewood Cookbook is delish and uses
>>>a pound of mushrooms. If you don't have the cookbook you can find the
>>>recipe in a google search. I use butter rather that OO on the filo and
>>>forgo the sesame seeds.
>>>
>>>Jessuca

>>
>>
>>

>




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Peter Aitken
 
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"R Hobson" > wrote in message
...
> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>
> Thanks in advance.


Make duxelles. Chop fine - 1/4 inch pieces or so - and cook slowly in buter
or oil. Stir frequently until the liquid has almost all evaporated. They
will slowly reduce to a thick lumpy mass. Cool and freeze in 1/2c portions.
Then you can add to things where you want a mushroom flavor - meat loaf,
gravies, etc.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dimitri
 
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"R Hobson" > wrote in message
...
> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>
> Thanks in advance.


Cooked mushrooms freeze very well.

Just dice or mince the shrooms and fry in butter or evoo. When cool place
into baggies and freeze.

Dimitri


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--
 
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"R Hobson" > wrote in message
...
> We have a costco-sized "tray" of mushrooms that need to be eaten in teh
> next few days before we take a 4-day trip. Anyone have recipes or
> suggestions for cooking up a big batch of these?
>
> Thanks in advance.


beef bourgonien -
uses fresh mushrooms, stores well because it is so fine it is great even
when leftovers (which there are unfortunately few of - use cheap burgundy,
BTW, not cooking wine, and a heavy pan)


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > Dwayne,
> >
> > How do you can mushrooms?

>
> I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
> variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
> the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
> boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
> half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
> rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
> cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
> Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
> colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
> lbs pressure. HTH
>
> Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
> for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
> pint jars for my canner.


Sounds pretty easy... :-)
How well do they keep?

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Dwayne wrote:
>
> > I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
> > sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
> > pressure canner.

>
> I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working on
> cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
> with the beef burgundy. Even the garbage disposal didn't want either!
>
>


Oh. My goodness. :-)

I cook Portabello's in a variety of ways, but my two favorites are
either sauteed or grilled.

Slice portabellos into thin slices, add some thin sliced shallots or
leeks. Put into a skillet with some olive oil and lots of butter and
sautee' until they are well wilted and cooked thru.

Serve over steak or just as a side dish with steamed greens.

My #1 favorite way is grilling!

Take whole portabello mushroom caps, marinate in Wishbone zesty italian
salad dressing for a few hours so they gills soak it up well.

Place over a hot grill (I generally cook over wood or real charcoal, not
briquettes) and grill until the edges begin to crisp.

Serve either as a side dish to grilled meat or make a "veggieburger" by
placing on a toasted hamburger bun and dressing with a bit of ranch
dressing, tomatoe, pickle slices and lettuce.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


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Peter Aitken
 
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"Katra" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Serendipity > wrote:
>
>> Katra wrote:
>>
>> > Dwayne,
>> >
>> > How do you can mushrooms?

>>
>> I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
>> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
>> variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
>> the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
>> boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
>> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
>> half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
>> rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
>> cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
>> Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
>> colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
>> lbs pressure. HTH
>>
>> Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
>> for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
>> pint jars for my canner.

>
> Sounds pretty easy... :-)
> How well do they keep?
>
> --


Canning mushrooms in a boiling water bath (not a pressure canner) might
invite botulism because they are not acidic. Adding ascorbic acid can
prevent this as long as you are sure the amount you are adding is enough.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 09 Mar 2005 11:55:36a, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> "Katra" > wrote in message
> ...
>> In article >,
>> Serendipity > wrote:
>>
>>> Katra wrote:
>>>
>>> > Dwayne,
>>> >
>>> > How do you can mushrooms?
>>>
>>> I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from
>>> here.
>>> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
>>> variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
>>> the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
>>> boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can
>>> them:
>>> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
>>> half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
>>> rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
>>> cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
>>> Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For
>>> better colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45
>>> minutes at 10 lbs pressure. HTH
>>>
>>> Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
>>> for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
>>> pint jars for my canner.

>>
>> Sounds pretty easy... :-)
>> How well do they keep?
>>
>> --

>
> Canning mushrooms in a boiling water bath (not a pressure canner) might
> invite botulism because they are not acidic. Adding ascorbic acid can
> prevent this as long as you are sure the amount you are adding is
> enough.
>
>


OTOH, pickled mushrooms can easily be processing in a BWB without the same
risk encountered with canned mushrooms.

Wayne
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Serendipity
 
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Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> Serendipity > wrote:
>
>
>>Katra wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Dwayne,
>>>
>>>How do you can mushrooms?

>>
>>I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
>> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
>>variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
>>the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
>>boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
>> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
>>half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
>>rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
>>cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
>>Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
>>colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
>>lbs pressure. HTH
>>
>>Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
>>for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
>>pint jars for my canner.

>
>
> Sounds pretty easy... :-)
> How well do they keep?
>

Katra, they keep the same as other homecanned vegetables. The time line
is 1 year and I normally go from one season to the next. You can keep
homecanned items longer than a year but the quality may decrease. I
certainly wouldn't keep homecanned anything longer than two years. With
mushrooms, I can get them year round. Twenty pints last a very short
time here At any given time I have anywhere from 10 to 40 jars of
mushrooms. I rotate my mushroom stash so the oldest jars get used
first. We go through a lot and I doubt any one jar sits longer than 4
or 5 months.
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> Serendipity > wrote:
>
>
>>Dwayne wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
>>>sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
>>>pressure canner.

>>
>>I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working on
>>cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
>>with the beef burgundy. Even the garbage disposal didn't want either!
>>
>>

>
>
> Oh. My goodness. :-)
>
> I cook Portabello's in a variety of ways, but my two favorites are
> either sauteed or grilled.
>
> Slice portabellos into thin slices, add some thin sliced shallots or
> leeks. Put into a skillet with some olive oil and lots of butter and
> sautee' until they are well wilted and cooked thru.
>
> Serve over steak or just as a side dish with steamed greens.
>
> My #1 favorite way is grilling!
>
> Take whole portabello mushroom caps, marinate in Wishbone zesty italian
> salad dressing for a few hours so they gills soak it up well.
>
> Place over a hot grill (I generally cook over wood or real charcoal, not
> briquettes) and grill until the edges begin to crisp.
>
> Serve either as a side dish to grilled meat or make a "veggieburger" by
> placing on a toasted hamburger bun and dressing with a bit of ranch
> dressing, tomatoe, pickle slices and lettuce.
>

Thanks for the tips! I bought another 3 portabellos Monday and was
looking for a way to cook them. I'll try grilling them.
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
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Peter Aitken wrote:

> "Katra" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>In article >,
>>Serendipity > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Katra wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Dwayne,
>>>>
>>>>How do you can mushrooms?
>>>
>>>I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
>>> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
>>>variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
>>>the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
>>>boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
>>> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
>>>half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
>>>rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
>>>cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
>>>Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
>>>colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
>>>lbs pressure. HTH
>>>
>>>Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
>>>for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
>>>pint jars for my canner.

>>
>>Sounds pretty easy... :-)
>>How well do they keep?
>>
>>--

>
>
> Canning mushrooms in a boiling water bath (not a pressure canner) might
> invite botulism because they are not acidic. Adding ascorbic acid can
> prevent this as long as you are sure the amount you are adding is enough.
>
>

I gave the instructions for canning in a pressure canner hence the "45
minutes a 10 lb pressure". Did you miss that in my instructions? The
*only* thing the ascorbic acid does is act as a colour preservative. No
one in their right mind would try canning mushrooms in a boiling water bath!


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >,
"Peter Aitken" > wrote:

> "Katra" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > Serendipity > wrote:
> >
> >> Katra wrote:
> >>
> >> > Dwayne,
> >> >
> >> > How do you can mushrooms?
> >>
> >> I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
> >> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
> >> variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
> >> the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
> >> boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
> >> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
> >> half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
> >> rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
> >> cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
> >> Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
> >> colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
> >> lbs pressure. HTH
> >>
> >> Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
> >> for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
> >> pint jars for my canner.

> >
> > Sounds pretty easy... :-)
> > How well do they keep?
> >
> > --

>
> Canning mushrooms in a boiling water bath (not a pressure canner) might
> invite botulism because they are not acidic. Adding ascorbic acid can
> prevent this as long as you are sure the amount you are adding is enough.


Thanks for that... That was my concern.
When my parents were teaching me about canned food, they warned me that
of all the canned foods that had a danger for botulism, canned mushrooms
were the most dangerous.

They also taught me to always discard ANY canned food that had lost it's
seal, or metal canned commercial foods that were bulging.

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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In article >,
Wayne Boatwright > wrote:

> On Wed 09 Mar 2005 11:55:36a, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
> > "Katra" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> In article >,
> >> Serendipity > wrote:
> >>
> >>> Katra wrote:
> >>>
> >>> > Dwayne,
> >>> >
> >>> > How do you can mushrooms?
> >>>
> >>> I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from
> >>> here.
> >>> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
> >>> variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
> >>> the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
> >>> boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can
> >>> them:
> >>> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
> >>> half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
> >>> rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
> >>> cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
> >>> Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For
> >>> better colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45
> >>> minutes at 10 lbs pressure. HTH
> >>>
> >>> Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
> >>> for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
> >>> pint jars for my canner.
> >>
> >> Sounds pretty easy... :-)
> >> How well do they keep?
> >>
> >> --

> >
> > Canning mushrooms in a boiling water bath (not a pressure canner) might
> > invite botulism because they are not acidic. Adding ascorbic acid can
> > prevent this as long as you are sure the amount you are adding is
> > enough.
> >
> >

>
> OTOH, pickled mushrooms can easily be processing in a BWB without the same
> risk encountered with canned mushrooms.
>
> Wayne


Probably has something to do with the salt and vinegar? ;-)

So, how do YOU pickle mushrooms?

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
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I like to stuff them with cheese and other things and bake/broil/grill
them. Recently it was blue cheese and horseradish. Other cheeses and
things work as well. Bacon, garlic, and fontina for example.

Otherwise, I like to cook a bunch with porkchops. Brown the porkchops
with some onions, add the shrooms and a little liquid (beer works for
me) and let the shrooms cook down a bit. Then add sour cream or even
cream cheese in a pinch and you get a great mushroom gravy for the
chops.

Finally, they also go good with steak. I also like to add some shallots
to the mix, and maybe some onions.

Dean G.

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default


> wrote

> Finally, they also go good with steak. I also like to add some shallots
> to the mix, and maybe some onions.


Paula Deen's brandied ? mushrooms don't last long around me, and they
do go great with steak. I can't get enough of them.

nancy


  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Fifo
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Serendipity wrote:

> I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working

on
> cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
> with the beef burgundy. Even the garbage disposal didn't want

either!

The saute methods work fine but I would like to offer a bit of a twist
to it.

Try this - in a non-stick pot, over high heat, add a little water (just
a little) and the sliced mushrooms. The mushrooms will release more
water. Stir until all the water evaporates. NOW add the butter. Stir
constantly to coat the mushrooms. Take off the heat and add black
pepper and chopped parsley.

This produces more intense mushroom flavor and gets rid of the somewhat
slimy coating that regular saute will give you.



  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Rodney Myrvaagnes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 09 Mar 2005 08:46:19 -0500, Serendipity >
wrote:

>Dwayne wrote:
>
>> I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
>> sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in my
>> pressure canner.

>
>I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working on
>cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
>with the beef burgundy. Even the garbage disposal didn't want either!
>

Maybe you are trying too hard. One thing to do with Portobellos if you
are in a hurry: Chop the stems and mix with minced garlic, maybe an
herb, maybe a chopped hot pepper or dsh of hot sauce.

Mash in warm butter or mix with a little olive oil. Put mix into the
caps. Then you can cook the caps under a broiler, in a grill pan, or
in a microwave. The results will differ but pretty foolproof.

If you have some time, portobellos and creminis (which are smaller but
the same species) gain a lot of earthy flavor if you cook them for 45
minutes. Excellent on pasta and almost like wild mushrooms

After the long cooking, they can be pureed to make a really intense
mushroom soup.



Rodney Myrvaagnes Opinionated old geezer

Brutal dictators are routinely reelected by 90+%
margins. Only in a truly advanced democracy can
one win an election by a negative 600,000 votes.
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > Serendipity > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Dwayne wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that hadn't
> >>>sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them in
> >>>my
> >>>pressure canner.
> >>
> >>I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working on
> >>cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
> >>with the beef burgundy. Even the garbage disposal didn't want either!
> >>
> >>

> >
> >
> > Oh. My goodness. :-)
> >
> > I cook Portabello's in a variety of ways, but my two favorites are
> > either sauteed or grilled.
> >
> > Slice portabellos into thin slices, add some thin sliced shallots or
> > leeks. Put into a skillet with some olive oil and lots of butter and
> > sautee' until they are well wilted and cooked thru.
> >
> > Serve over steak or just as a side dish with steamed greens.
> >
> > My #1 favorite way is grilling!
> >
> > Take whole portabello mushroom caps, marinate in Wishbone zesty italian
> > salad dressing for a few hours so they gills soak it up well.
> >
> > Place over a hot grill (I generally cook over wood or real charcoal, not
> > briquettes) and grill until the edges begin to crisp.
> >
> > Serve either as a side dish to grilled meat or make a "veggieburger" by
> > placing on a toasted hamburger bun and dressing with a bit of ranch
> > dressing, tomatoe, pickle slices and lettuce.
> >

> Thanks for the tips! I bought another 3 portabellos Monday and was
> looking for a way to cook them. I'll try grilling them.


Most welcome!
Please report????
--
K.
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Serendipity > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > Serendipity > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Katra wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Dwayne,
> >>>
> >>>How do you can mushrooms?
> >>
> >>I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
> >> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
> >>variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
> >>the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
> >>boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
> >> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
> >>half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
> >>rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
> >>cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
> >>Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
> >>colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
> >>lbs pressure. HTH
> >>
> >>Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
> >>for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
> >>pint jars for my canner.

> >
> >
> > Sounds pretty easy... :-)
> > How well do they keep?
> >

> Katra, they keep the same as other homecanned vegetables. The time line
> is 1 year and I normally go from one season to the next. You can keep
> homecanned items longer than a year but the quality may decrease. I
> certainly wouldn't keep homecanned anything longer than two years. With
> mushrooms, I can get them year round. Twenty pints last a very short
> time here At any given time I have anywhere from 10 to 40 jars of
> mushrooms. I rotate my mushroom stash so the oldest jars get used
> first. We go through a lot and I doubt any one jar sits longer than 4
> or 5 months.


I see, thanks!
That sounds reasonable...

It's just that, well, my mom used to can a LOT of stuff!
She passed away a couple of years ago and we've been slowly going thru a
lot of old canned goods.

Most canned veggies, even tho' they still appear to have a seal, have
dried out so we tossed them.

There is a quart jar of canned plums right now on the counter I want to
make a cobbler with that looks very good and is still sealed.

The canning date on it is 1975..... ;-)

I ran across some canned rattlesnake that was canned back in the early
80's and we've used it recently, and it was just fine also. Mom always
pressure canned meat and used enough salt in it for long term
preservation.

I still have many jars of her blackberry and dewberry jelly that are
well over 10 years old. I know for a fact that in some of those boxes,
there are cherries that are over 20 years old and still good.

That's why I was asking....

Thanks!
Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Serendipity
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra wrote:

> In article >,
> Serendipity > wrote:
>
>
>>Katra wrote:
>>
>>
>>>In article >,
>>> Serendipity > wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Katra wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Dwayne,
>>>>>
>>>>>How do you can mushrooms?
>>>>
>>>>I also can mushrooms. There is a mushroom farm a short drive from here.
>>>> The cost for a 5lb box of seconds (perfectly good mushooms just a
>>>>variety of sizes) is $6. The same amount of firsts is $8. These are
>>>>the huge stuffing mushrooms. To make it worth my while, I buy 4 - 5lb
>>>>boxes at a time, usually 3 seconds and 1 firsts. Here's how I can them:
>>>> Trim and soak in cold water 10 minutes. Wash. Cut large ones in
>>>>half. I do the smallest ones whole into separate jars and slice the
>>>>rest into other jars. Cook gently 15 minutes. If doing as previous,
>>>>cook in two separate pots. Hot pack and cover with boiling water.
>>>>Leave 1/2 in head space. Add salt 1/2 tsp per pt (optional). For better
>>>>colour, add 1/8 tsp ascorbic acid. Adust lids. Process 45 minutes at 10
>>>>lbs pressure. HTH
>>>>
>>>>Notes: A pint jar is the equilavent of 500 ml jar; this is a nice size
>>>>for canned mushrooms. I try to do a canner full which is 20 regular
>>>>pint jars for my canner.
>>>
>>>
>>>Sounds pretty easy... :-)
>>>How well do they keep?
>>>

>>
>>Katra, they keep the same as other homecanned vegetables. The time line
>>is 1 year and I normally go from one season to the next. You can keep
>>homecanned items longer than a year but the quality may decrease. I
>>certainly wouldn't keep homecanned anything longer than two years. With
>>mushrooms, I can get them year round. Twenty pints last a very short
>>time here At any given time I have anywhere from 10 to 40 jars of
>>mushrooms. I rotate my mushroom stash so the oldest jars get used
>>first. We go through a lot and I doubt any one jar sits longer than 4
>>or 5 months.

>
>
> I see, thanks!
> That sounds reasonable...
>
> It's just that, well, my mom used to can a LOT of stuff!
> She passed away a couple of years ago and we've been slowly going thru a
> lot of old canned goods.
>
> Most canned veggies, even tho' they still appear to have a seal, have
> dried out so we tossed them.
>
> There is a quart jar of canned plums right now on the counter I want to
> make a cobbler with that looks very good and is still sealed.
>
> The canning date on it is 1975..... ;-)
>
> I ran across some canned rattlesnake that was canned back in the early
> 80's and we've used it recently, and it was just fine also. Mom always
> pressure canned meat and used enough salt in it for long term
> preservation.
>
> I still have many jars of her blackberry and dewberry jelly that are
> well over 10 years old. I know for a fact that in some of those boxes,
> there are cherries that are over 20 years old and still good.


I've heard of people eating canned foods well over two years old.
Personally I aim from season to season for each canned food item. If
there is any signs of spoilage, I toss. Now, rattlesnake sounds
interesting. I've never eaten snake before. My FIL used to eat eel
which is about as close to snake, I guess. Those canned plums are like
30 years old? I'd have my doubts and they would just be tossed but then
I tend to be cautious.

What you have with your mother's stash of canned goods is quite common
especially when kids have to clean out their parents house. People that
experienced the drepression tossed nothing and many canned everything in
sight. The problem is they didn't use it Half the fun of canning is
enjoying the fruits of your labor!
>
> That's why I was asking....
>
> Thanks!
> Kat
>

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Katra" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Serendipity > wrote:
>
> > Dwayne wrote:
> >
> > > I went to the store this AM and found 3 bags of portabellas that

hadn't
> > > sold, and they were marked down. I brought them home and canned them

in my
> > > pressure canner.

> >
> > I've canned regular mushrooms but not portabellas. I'm still working on
> > cooking portabellas properly. My first attempt was a disaster along
> > with the beef burgundy.


I'm not sure portabellas are a good choice for beef burgonien. (My orginal
resposne was for a way to use up extra mushrooms before a trip, and I
assumed they were store-buttons). Kind of a waste of portabella and beef.
IMHO.

I have an excellent recipe, but I have seen others use it and have it
turn out all the way from soup to goo rather than as a rich thick stew. So
its one of those dishes where the untold details count a lot.
After making it several times, I swear that all the old home kitchens in
France all have a heavy iron pot where they throw all the leftover stuff to
make stew. No frenchman would eat the stuff made in other pots.

1) BB is a slow cooked dish done in a heavy iron pot with a heavy iron lid.
Try it in aluminum, and its wet slop.
2) any wine but actual burgundy really screws it up. Cooking wine gets
salted beef slop.
3) I have tried making it with various cuts of beef - it's chuck or it goes
downhill fast, and leaner cuts just don't work. Rump makes unsmoked jerky
soup
4) I use my finger to run some of the wine/broth around the rim before
putting it in the oven. Acts a little like a seal. Of course, I check the
wine occasionally (just to be sure it hasn't soured) and talk french to it,
as well.
5) The browning in flour makes the gravy paste, and the wine is the liquid
for the gravy. So basically it's leftover fresh vegs and meat simmered for
3-4 hours in a gravy made from flour and beef fat and wine.




Even the garbage disposal didn't want either!
> >
> >

>
> Oh. My goodness. :-)
>
> I cook Portabello's in a variety of ways, but my two favorites are
> either sauteed or grilled.
>
> Slice portabellos into thin slices, add some thin sliced shallots or
> leeks. Put into a skillet with some olive oil and lots of butter and
> sautee' until they are well wilted and cooked thru.
>
> Serve over steak or just as a side dish with steamed greens.
>
> My #1 favorite way is grilling!
>
> Take whole portabello mushroom caps, marinate in Wishbone zesty italian
> salad dressing for a few hours so they gills soak it up well.
>
> Place over a hot grill (I generally cook over wood or real charcoal, not
> briquettes) and grill until the edges begin to crisp.
>
> Serve either as a side dish to grilled meat or make a "veggieburger" by
> placing on a toasted hamburger bun and dressing with a bit of ranch
> dressing, tomatoe, pickle slices and lettuce.
>
> --
> K.
>
> Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
>
> There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train

the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada
>
> >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<

>
>

http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


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