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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
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Default The OTHER luncheon meat -- braunschweiger

Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
mustard and pickles?

Bob


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Katra
 
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In article >,
"Bob" > wrote:

> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
> mustard and pickles?
>
> Bob
>
>


Steamed with kraut and potatoes, or chinese cabbage,
or chopped into stir fry, or grilled on a stick......

Lots and LOTS of uses! ;-d

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nobody
 
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A popular dish in the Philippines is "lechon", roast pork served with a
sweet-sour liver sauce. The sauce can be made with braunschweiger instead of
the canned pate that is often recommended.

Also, it is great on a sandwich with grape jelly.

"Bob" > wrote in message
...
> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches
> with mustard and pickles?
>
> Bob
>



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Damsel in dis Dress
 
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"Bob" >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
>mustard and pickles?


* Exported from MasterCook *

Pauper's Pté

Recipe By amsel's Heirloom Recipes
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : appetizers

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ ------------------------------*--
2 packages green onion dip mix -- .56 oz.
1 teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons water
1 pound braunschweiger (liverwurst)
3/4 teaspoon garlic -- minced, peeled
1/8 teaspoon salt
3 ounces cream cheese -- softened
1 1/2 teaspoons milk
1 dash tabasco sauce -- to taste
1 fresh parsley -- chopped

1. In a small bowl, mix green onion dip mix, sugar and water until
moistened.
2. In a medium-sized bowl, mash braunschweiger with a fork until smooth.
Add onion mixture and continue mashing until thoroughly combined. Mound
on a serving platter.
3. With a small metal spatula or blade of a knife, mash garlic and salt
to form a smooth paste.
4. In a small bowl, beat cream cheese, milk, and tabasco sauce until
smooth; stir in garlic mixture. Spread cheese-garlic mixture evenly over
braunschweiger mixture.
5. Refrigerate several hours and sprinkle with parsley just before
serving. Good served with plain crackers or Melba toast.


Source:
"Pat Zastera"

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limey
 
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"Bob" > wrote in message > Okay, I got some
braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
> mustard and pickles?
>
> Bob


And what about the kids' favorite - bologna?
(pronounced "baloney" in these parts. Describes it pretty well.)

Dora




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TheAlligator
 
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"Bob" > wrote:

>Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
>mustard and pickles?
>
>Bob
>
>

Nothing. That's what it was made for and it's the BEST!
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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limey wrote:
> "Bob" > wrote in message > Okay, I got

some
> braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
> > mustard and pickles?
> >
> > Bob

>
> And what about the kids' favorite - bologna?
> (pronounced "baloney" in these parts. Describes it pretty well.)
>
> Dora


I enjoy a good bologna sandwich, boar's Head is good, but so are the
Kosher bolognas (no, not the ones sold in stupidmarkets, they're the
same brand names, and they are kosher [of a sort - they start out
kosher], but not even close to the same recipes used for those sold in
kosher delis), kosher foods sold in a store with non kosher items right
along side ain't really kosher... anyone who keeps kosher will never
be convinced that the Hebrew National products sold in a store that
sells pork is still kosher.

In fact I enjoy most cold cuts, I like braunschweiger/liverwurst too (I
like mine on dark dense bread/brot with grainy mustard and lots of raw
onion. I like the loaves too; olive loaf, pickle loaf, pepper loaf,
and one of my all time favorites, head cheese (hey, it's actually quite
healthful (much lower salt and fat than others, plus you can easily
distinguish those nice meat chunks... and all that lovely piquant
gelatine), Boar's Head has the best head cheese... obviously their
namesake. Of course I really like what I call the king of bolognas,
mortadella... Boar's Head is a great one, love those pistachios. And
no, Oscar Mayer is NOT b-o-l-o-g-n-a, their ditty is a lie... all Oscar
Mayer products are the closest thing to Soylent Green.

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limey
 
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"Sheldon" wrote in message >

> limey wrote:
>> "Bob" wrote in message

> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches

with
>> > mustard and pickles?
>> >
>> > Bob

>>
>> And what about the kids' favorite - bologna?
>> (pronounced "baloney" in these parts. Describes it pretty well.)
>>
>> Dora

>
> In fact I enjoy most cold cuts, I like braunschweiger/liverwurst too (I
> like mine on dark dense bread/brot with grainy mustard and lots of raw
> onion. I like the loaves too; olive loaf, pickle loaf, pepper loaf,
> and one of my all time favorites, head cheese (hey, it's actually quite
> healthful (much lower salt and fat than others, plus you can easily
> distinguish those nice meat chunks... and all that lovely piquant
> gelatine), Boar's Head has the best head cheese... obviously their
> namesake. Of course I really like what I call the king of bolognas,
> mortadella... Boar's Head is a great one, love those pistachios. And
> no, Oscar Mayer is NOT b-o-l-o-g-n-a, their ditty is a lie... all Oscar
> Mayer products are the closest thing to Soylent Green.


Yes, Oscar Mayer bologna was what I was meaning. Ugh. I like liverwurst
and head cheese too, as well as my all-time favorites - smoked tongue,
together with great corned beef. Would that I had a great kosher deli
nearby - can you still dip kosher pickles out of a barrel, or has that gone
by the wayside?

Dora


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Dimitri
 
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"Sheldon" > wrote in message
ps.com...

<snip>

> I enjoy a good bologna sandwich, boar's Head is good, but so are the
> Kosher bolognas (no, not the ones sold in stupidmarkets, they're the same
> brand names, and they are kosher [of a sort - they start out kosher, but
> not even close to the same recipes used for those sold in kosher delis),
> kosher foods sold in a store with non kosher items right along side ain't
> really kosher... anyone who keeps kosher will never be convinced that the
> Hebrew National products sold in a store that sells pork is still kosher.


> In fact I enjoy most cold cuts, I like braunschweiger/liverwurst too (I
> like mine on dark dense bread/brot with grainy mustard and lots of raw
> onion. I like the loaves too; olive loaf, pickle loaf, pepper loaf, and
> one of my all time favorites, head cheese (hey, it's actually quite
> healthful (much lower salt and fat than others, plus you can easily

distinguish those nice meat chunks... and all that lovely piquant
gelatine), Boar's Head has the best head cheese... obviously their
namesake. Of course I really like what I call the king of bolognas,
mortadella... Boar's Head is a great one, love those pistachios. And no,
Oscar Mayer is NOT b-o-l-o-g-n-a, their ditty is a lie... all Oscar Mayer
products are the closest thing to Soylent Green.

Great movie!

There is a local "German" butcher/sausage maker/smokehouse in Montrose
California called Schreiner's. Thank God they are closed by the time I
drive by on the way home or I may have to take out a 2nd mortgage. That is
a place where my eyes are definitely bigger than my stomach.

Their Black Forest Ham, and their salami's are to die for. They have several
different types of braunschweiger/liverwurst including one with
pistachios. They have the only place I have ever tasted Veal Bologna, it is
to die for. Damn I'm getting hungry just thinking about the place.

Dimitri







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Damsel in dis Dress
 
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"Dave W." >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Ever tried braunschweiger fried? I did once. Didn't like it much so I
>don't think I'll do it again.


I would imagine that it'd smell like dog poop when heated. This coming
from someone who used to use it as a spread on white bread (the bread got
really compacted) for years and years. Don't remember when I had it last,
though. My recollection is that it has kind of a gritty texture? Is that
right?

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
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TheAlligator
 
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"Dave W." > wrote:
>That's interesting. I've been a braunschweiger freak for over half a
>century and never had mustard or pickles with it. Always used mayo and
>onion and beer ... lot'sa beer. On crackers or dark rye. (My family used
>to call it "chicken liver" ... have no idea why.)
>
>I'll have to give the mustard and/or pickles a try sometime (when my
>cardiologist's back is turned). I'll try it with beer ... yeah, that
>sounds good. 8^)

Well, if you put enough beer on cat food, that would taste pretty good
too. <G>
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
jmcquown
 
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TheAlligator wrote:
> "Dave W." > wrote:
>> That's interesting. I've been a braunschweiger freak for over half a
>> century and never had mustard or pickles with it. Always used mayo
>> and onion and beer ... lot'sa beer. On crackers or dark rye. (My
>> family used to call it "chicken liver" ... have no idea why.)
>>
>> I'll have to give the mustard and/or pickles a try sometime (when my
>> cardiologist's back is turned). I'll try it with beer ... yeah, that
>> sounds good. 8^)

> Well, if you put enough beer on cat food, that would taste pretty good
> too. <G>


LOL! My cat's canned food (prescription) costs more than this stuff!

Jill


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Dave W.
 
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In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> "Dave W." >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >Ever tried braunschweiger fried? I did once. Didn't like it much so I
> >don't think I'll do it again.

>
> I would imagine that it'd smell like dog poop when heated.


You're not far off there! I got the frying idea from a German cookbook.
The called it "Heisse Leberwurst" .... Hot liverwurst. I don't know if
liverwurst and braunschweiger are the same. What I buy labeled
liverwurst in Cincinnati tastes similar, but perhaps a bit, uh, more
"livery" than braunschweiger. I don't understand why I like this stuff
so much ... liver (beef or pork) kind of turns my stomach.

<This coming
> from someone who used to use it as a spread on white bread (the bread got
> really compacted) for years and years. Don't remember when I had it last,
> though. My recollection is that it has kind of a gritty texture? Is that
> right?
>

Yeah, I ate a fair amount on "Wonder Bread" as a kid. The stuff we had
then is pretty much what I get now ... not very gritty ... smooth and
spreadable if you get it in a plastic covered 1 and a half inch sausage
shaped thing. I also find it in a larger diameter plastic casing (2 and
a half in.?). That seems a bit less spreadable so I just slice it.

> Carol

Regards,
Dave W.

--
Living in the Ozarks
For email, edu will do.

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth
becomes a revolutionary act. - George Orwell, (1903-1950)
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Dimitri
 
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"Dave W." > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>
>> "Dave W." >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>> >Ever tried braunschweiger fried? I did once. Didn't like it much so I
>> >don't think I'll do it again.

>>
>> I would imagine that it'd smell like dog poop when heated.

>
> You're not far off there! I got the frying idea from a German cookbook.
> The called it "Heisse Leberwurst" .... Hot liverwurst. I don't know if
> liverwurst and braunschweiger are the same.


Some difference;

Dimitri

braunschweiger
[BROWN-shwi-ger, BROWN-shvi-ger]
Named after the German town of Braunschweig, this smoked liver sausage
enriched with eggs and milk is the most famous of the LIVERWURSTS. It's soft
enough to be spreadable and is usually served at room temperature. See also
SAUSAGE.
© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

liverwurst
[LIHV-uhr-wurst, LIHV-uhr-vursht]
A broad term for "liver sausage" referring to well-seasoned, ready-to-eat
sausage made from at least 30 percent pork liver mixed with pork or other
meat. The texture of liverwurst can range from firm enough to slice to
creamy-smooth and spreadable. It can be smoked or plain and comes in large
links, loaves and slices. It's generally used for snacks and sandwiches and
is especially suited to rye bread and crackers. See also SAUSAGE;
BRAUNSCHWEIGER - the most popular of the liverwursts.
© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.




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zxcvbob
 
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Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> "Dave W." >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
>
>>Ever tried braunschweiger fried? I did once. Didn't like it much so I
>>don't think I'll do it again.

>
>
> I would imagine that it'd smell like dog poop when heated. This coming
> from someone who used to use it as a spread on white bread (the bread got
> really compacted) for years and years. Don't remember when I had it last,
> though. My recollection is that it has kind of a gritty texture? Is that
> right?
>
> Carol



Hmmm. I've never heated dog poop...

Yes, some braunschweiger is kind of creamy and kind of gritty at the
same time.

Best regards,
Bob, who just might buy some braunschweiger and dense sourdough bread on
the way home
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Charles Gifford
 
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"Bob" > wrote in message
...
> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches

with
> mustard and pickles?
>
> Bob


I can't really help Bob except to refine the sandwich. The only way I like
braunschweiger is on a seeded or multi-grain bread with grainy mustard and
bread-and-butter pickles. Very yummy!

Charlie


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Charles Gifford
 
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"Sheldon" > wrote in message
ps.com...
>
>
> I enjoy a good bologna sandwich, boar's Head is good, but so are the
> Kosher bolognas (no, not the ones sold in stupidmarkets, they're the
> same brand names,

<SNIP>

I purchased some Bar S bologna, a 2lb. piece cut in the casing and was very
surprised at the quality of it. Bar S makes my favorite supermarket hot dogs
so I shouldn't have been surprised I suppose. Do you have this brand on the
U.S. Eastern Seaboard? It may be a western product. It is very much cheaper
than Boars Head which is too expensive for me to have more often than as a
rare treat.

Charlie


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Sheldon
 
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Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> "Dave W." >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >Ever tried braunschweiger fried? I did once. Didn't like it much so

I
> >don't think I'll do it again.

>
> I would imagine that it'd smell like dog poop when heated. This

coming
> from someone who used to use it as a spread on white bread (the bread

got
> really compacted) for years and years. Don't remember when I had it

last,
> though. My recollection is that it has kind of a gritty texture? Is

that
> right?


Depends on the grade... the cheapo stuff can be not only gritty but
also tastes lousy. I don't think braunschweiger will fry up very well,
it has a fairly high fat content, would probably just melt.... kinda
like frying cheese.

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
salgud
 
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On crackers or dark rye. (My family used
to call it "chicken liver" ... have no idea why.)
I'll have to give the mustard and/or pickles a try sometime (when my
cardiologist's back is turned). I'll try it with beer ... yeah, that
sounds good. 8^)


Won't the beer make the crackers soggy?



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lynn from Fargo
 
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Oh man! I miss braunschweiger and liverwurst and fried chicken livers
and liver & onions and gehackte leber and all that stuff. Organ meats
are verboten to folks who are susceptible to gout.

Lynn from Fargo

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Charles Gifford
 
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"Charles Gifford" > wrote in message
ink.net...
>
> "Bob" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches

> with
> > mustard and pickles?
> >
> > Bob

>
> I can't really help Bob except to refine the sandwich. The only way I like
> braunschweiger is on a seeded or multi-grain bread with grainy mustard and
> bread-and-butter pickles. Very yummy!
>
> Charlie


I'm following-up here. I cut the braunschweiger in fairly thick slices. I
don't spread it.

Charlie


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Mon 07 Mar 2005 08:01:08a, limey wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
> "Bob" > wrote in message > Okay, I got some
> braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
>> mustard and pickles?
>>
>> Bob

>
> And what about the kids' favorite - bologna?
> (pronounced "baloney" in these parts. Describes it pretty well.)
>
> Dora


I never bought it in my life, and tasted it only once. Ptoohey!


--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Hmmm. I've never heated dog poop...


It comes out pre-heated.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"Bob" > wrote in message
...
> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches
> with mustard and pickles?
>
> Bob



Sandwiches with mayo and onions.

I despise liver, but I do like braunschweiger on a sandwich. Once I made
the grave mistake of grilling one. OMG, it reverts back to liver when
heated!! One bite and I made a ham sandwich.





  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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"Sheldon" >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>
>> My recollection is that it has kind of a gritty texture? Is that
>> right?

>
>Depends on the grade... the cheapo stuff can be not only gritty but
>also tastes lousy. I don't think braunschweiger will fry up very well,
>it has a fairly high fat content, would probably just melt.... kinda
>like frying cheese.


I guess I've never tasted the good stuff.

But hey, don't knock fried cheese. I do it all the time, but I nuke it on
parchment paper. Good stuff, Maynard!

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Isaac Wingfield
 
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In article >,
"Bob" > wrote:

> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
> mustard and pickles?


Mayo and lots of lettuce on a good white bread.

If you like braunschweiger, try a good liver pate' sometime; you can
find them prepackaged in the deli. I make sandwiches with it, as above.

Isaac
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Mon 07 Mar 2005 08:19:28p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
>>Hmmm. I've never heated dog poop...

>
> It comes out pre-heated.
>
> Carol


God, you're sick!

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
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Sheldon wrote:

> Depends on the grade... the cheapo stuff can be not only gritty but
> also tastes lousy. I don't think braunschweiger will fry up very well,
> it has a fairly high fat content, would probably just melt.... kinda
> like frying cheese.


I tried broiling it, wondering if it would melt. Instead, it got firmer, but
it didn't really taste any better for it. Thinking along those lines, I
might be on to something: How about a hot pastrami and braunschweiger on
rye, with mustard, pickles, and tomato slices?

I think I'll buy some pastrami, rye bread, and tomatoes on the way home from
work...

Bob


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 08 Mar 2005 08:22:17a, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Wayne Boatwright > wrote in
> :
>
>> On Mon 07 Mar 2005 08:01:08a, limey wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>>
>>> "Bob" > wrote in message > Okay, I got
>>> some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides sandwiches with
>>>> mustard and pickles?
>>>>
>>>> Bob
>>>
>>> And what about the kids' favorite - bologna?
>>> (pronounced "baloney" in these parts. Describes it pretty well.)
>>>
>>> Dora

>>
>> I never bought it in my life, and tasted it only once. Ptoohey!
>>
>>

>
> Well I like it. Nothing like a fried bologna sammich. Throw some cheese
> on and rock and roll. Mustard and onion are good too.
>
> Michael
>


Well, to each his own, Michael. Frankly, I'm glad there is nothing like
it! I don't think it could be disguised enough to be palatable to me.

Cheers,
Wayne


  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
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I wrote:

> How about a hot pastrami and braunschweiger on rye, with mustard, pickles,
> and tomato slices?


This was a winner, although I didn't do exactly what I wrote above. I heated
the pastrami slices in my toaster oven. While they were heating, I sliced a
big onion roll (looked better than the rye in the store) and put mustard on
the bottom half. I placed the braunschweiger slices on top of the mustard,
the pastrami on top of the braunschweiger, tomato slices on top of the
pastrami. Then I put some shredded pepper jack cheese on top of the whole
thing. I put some mayo and cheese on the top half. Both halves went into
the toaster oven until the cheese melted. I put kosher dill spears on the
sandwich after it came out of the oven.

Bob


  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Doug Freyburger
 
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Bob wrote:
>
> Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides

sandwiches with
> mustard and pickles?


Braunschweiger and liverwurst are both basically pate
with a different name on the label. You name the
recipe for pate, it could be worth trying. Teawurst,
too, which is saltier and more spreadable but still
basically pate.

I like to let a little braunschwieger come up to room
temp, mash it up, and use it as a dip for celery sticks
or carrot sticks. Mixing a green herb like tarragon or
dill during the mashing process is nice, too. Makes it
more faithfull to the pate idea.

Other point out that heating it isn't a good idea.
Above room temp I agree but room temp and below not a
problem in my opinion.

Braunschwieger also goes well with capers and/or
anchovies. A little blob makes an okay small topping
on a schnitzel. Vienna schitchel has a caper and an
anchovie as a topping; no idea what it's called when
there's a little blot of pate' instead.

  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 08 Mar 2005 03:56:55p, Doug Freyburger wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Braunschweiger and liverwurst are both basically pate
> with a different name on the label.


Not exactly. All braunschweiger is liverwurst, but not all liverwurst is
braunschweiger. IIRC, braunschweiger is smoked to some degree. Liverwurst
represents a variety of sausages made from liver.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Doug Freyburger wrote:
> Bob wrote:
> >
> > Okay, I got some braunschweiger. What's it good for besides

> sandwiches with
> > mustard and pickles?

>
> Braunschweiger and liverwurst are both basically pate
> with a different name on the label.


liverwurst
[LIHV-uhr-wurst, LIHV-uhr-vursht]
A broad term for "liver sausage" referring to well-seasoned,
ready-to-eat sausage made from at least 30 percent pork liver mixed
with pork or other meat. The texture of liverwurst can range from firm
enough to slice to creamy-smooth and spreadable. It can be smoked or
plain and comes in large links, loaves and slices. It's generally used
for snacks and sandwiches and is especially suited to rye bread and
crackers. See also BRAUNSCHWEIGER - the most popular of the
liverwursts.


braunschweiger
[BROWN-shwi-ger, BROWN-shvi-ger]
Named after the German town of Braunschweig, this smoked liver sausage
enriched with eggs and milk is the most famous of the LIVERWURSTS. It's
soft enough to be spreadable and is usually served at room temperature.


=A9 Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 08 Mar 2005 03:56:05p, Bob wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> I wrote:
>
>> How about a hot pastrami and braunschweiger on rye, with mustard,
>> pickles, and tomato slices?

>
> This was a winner, although I didn't do exactly what I wrote above. I
> heated the pastrami slices in my toaster oven. While they were heating,
> I sliced a big onion roll (looked better than the rye in the store) and
> put mustard on the bottom half. I placed the braunschweiger slices on
> top of the mustard, the pastrami on top of the braunschweiger, tomato
> slices on top of the pastrami. Then I put some shredded pepper jack
> cheese on top of the whole thing. I put some mayo and cheese on the top
> half. Both halves went into the toaster oven until the cheese melted. I
> put kosher dill spears on the sandwich after it came out of the oven.
>
> Bob


I never have pastrami at home, but I often order a sandwich of pastrami and
chopped liver at the local deli. Delicious! I sometimes buy
braunschweiger for home and usually eat it with a slice of onion and some
mayo on white or rye bread.


--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Doug Freyburger
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Doug Freyburger wrote:
>
> > Braunschweiger and liverwurst are both basically pate
> > with a different name on the label.

>
> Not exactly. All braunschweiger is liverwurst, but not
> all liverwurst is braunschweiger.


Irrelevant to the issue of whether they count as pate
and can be used in most ways that pate can be used.
Most pates found in stores use a liver base, some even a
pork or beef liver base like liverwurst. Some pate
recipes include smoke flavor, some don't, so the
difference between specific braunschweiger and general
liverwurst isn't effected by that point. The fact
that pate recipes without liver exist also doesn't
effect the issue until we get into heating the pate,
thus the mapping from braunschweiger to pate is good
but not complete.

Many pate recipes have nice extras like herbs or wine.
Various types of liverwurst can be moved to similar
functionality by blending herbs or wine into them. Not
an exact match but the OP was asking about alternate
uses not exact matches. Various types of liverwurst
make an okay starting point if your goal is just some
pate rather than a very specific pate recipe.

Going in the opposite direction from the initial post,
as much as I like turkey/chicken/duck/goose liver, I
wonder how much effort it would be to make a pate from
them that would substitute towards use in sandwiches.
Braunschweiger and other types of liverwurst are made
with beef and/or pork livers, but using bird livers
should work okay. Should be straightforward so the
next time I see a package of bird livers on sale while
I'm travelling for work I'll try it.

  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Wayne Boatwright >, if that's their real name,
wrote:

>On Mon 07 Mar 2005 08:19:28p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>>>Hmmm. I've never heated dog poop...

>>
>> It comes out pre-heated.
>>
>> Carol

>
>God, you're sick!


Hey, thanks!!!

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 09 Mar 2005 07:43:49a, Doug Freyburger wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>> Doug Freyburger wrote:
>>
>> > Braunschweiger and liverwurst are both basically pate with a
>> > different name on the label.

>>
>> Not exactly. All braunschweiger is liverwurst, but not all liverwurst
>> is braunschweiger.

>
> Irrelevant to the issue of whether they count as pate
> and can be used in most ways that pate can be used.
> Most pates found in stores use a liver base, some even a
> pork or beef liver base like liverwurst. Some pate
> recipes include smoke flavor, some don't, so the
> difference between specific braunschweiger and general
> liverwurst isn't effected by that point. The fact
> that pate recipes without liver exist also doesn't
> effect the issue until we get into heating the pate,
> thus the mapping from braunschweiger to pate is good
> but not complete.
>
> Many pate recipes have nice extras like herbs or wine.
> Various types of liverwurst can be moved to similar
> functionality by blending herbs or wine into them. Not
> an exact match but the OP was asking about alternate
> uses not exact matches. Various types of liverwurst
> make an okay starting point if your goal is just some
> pate rather than a very specific pate recipe.
>
> Going in the opposite direction from the initial post,
> as much as I like turkey/chicken/duck/goose liver, I
> wonder how much effort it would be to make a pate from
> them that would substitute towards use in sandwiches.
> Braunschweiger and other types of liverwurst are made
> with beef and/or pork livers, but using bird livers
> should work okay. Should be straightforward so the
> next time I see a package of bird livers on sale while
> I'm travelling for work I'll try it.


So what's your point? What is irrelevant to you may not be to someone
else. I don't consider either braunschweiger or liverwurst a pate. Both
are good, but neither is prepared in the style of a pate.

While also not a pate, chopped chicken livers are extremely easy to prepare
and make an excellent filling for sandwiches.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon 07 Mar 2005 08:19:28p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in
> rec.food.cooking:
>
>> zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>>>Hmmm. I've never heated dog poop...

>>
>> It comes out pre-heated.
>>
>> Carol

>
> God, you're sick!
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


Fast too! She beat me to it!

Bret



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  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 09 Mar 2005 07:58:35p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Mon 07 Mar 2005 08:19:28p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in
>> rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>> zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>>
>>>>Hmmm. I've never heated dog poop...
>>>
>>> It comes out pre-heated.
>>>
>>> Carol

>>
>> God, you're sick!
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright

>
> Fast too! She beat me to it!
>
> Bret


Carol's a quick one. Ya gotta get up a day ahead!

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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