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Dave Smith
 
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Daisy wrote:

> I love poached eggs and generally find them perfectly cooked at a cafe
> or restaurant. I can't seem to get the same result!
>
> One of my cookbooks describes the method for poached eggs as follows:
> using a deep frypan three-quarter fill with water, and bring to a
> simmer, then add 1 tsp white vinegar. Using a wooden spoon, swirl
> the water until a gentle whirlpool is formed and then put the egg in
> the centre. Cook for 3-4 minutes.
>
> Another variation on this is to add salt to the water, but the method
> was virtually the same. I asked the chef at a bistro recently where
> I had perfectly poached eggs, and he gave almost the same method but
> said it takes time and practise to perfect this.
>
> Can anyone else add any more to the above? When I first tried this
> whirlpool type method the white broke up too much - so I am doing
> something wrong!
>


That method works for me.
It may help to crack the egg into a small bowl or something rather than
plopping it directly in to the water where it might be more likely to fall
apart. The other thing is to make sure it is just a simmer, not a boil.
The action of the boiling water can break up the egg.


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Daisy
 
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Default Poaching Eggs

I love poached eggs and generally find them perfectly cooked at a cafe
or restaurant. I can't seem to get the same result!

One of my cookbooks describes the method for poached eggs as follows:
using a deep frypan three-quarter fill with water, and bring to a
simmer, then add 1 tsp white vinegar. Using a wooden spoon, swirl
the water until a gentle whirlpool is formed and then put the egg in
the centre. Cook for 3-4 minutes.

Another variation on this is to add salt to the water, but the method
was virtually the same. I asked the chef at a bistro recently where
I had perfectly poached eggs, and he gave almost the same method but
said it takes time and practise to perfect this.

Can anyone else add any more to the above? When I first tried this
whirlpool type method the white broke up too much - so I am doing
something wrong!

Thanx

Daisy
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Bob
 
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Daisy:

> Can anyone else add any more to the above? When I first tried this
> whirlpool type method the white broke up too much - so I am doing
> something wrong!


The fresher the egg is, the better the white holds together. Also, it might
be that you've got too much of a whirlpool, or that you're not lowering the
egg gently enough.

Bob


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Hahabogus
 
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Daisy > wrote in
:

> I love poached eggs and generally find them perfectly cooked at a cafe
> or restaurant. I can't seem to get the same result!
>
> One of my cookbooks describes the method for poached eggs as follows:
> using a deep frypan three-quarter fill with water, and bring to a
> simmer, then add 1 tsp white vinegar. Using a wooden spoon, swirl
> the water until a gentle whirlpool is formed and then put the egg in
> the centre. Cook for 3-4 minutes.
>
> Another variation on this is to add salt to the water, but the method
> was virtually the same. I asked the chef at a bistro recently where
> I had perfectly poached eggs, and he gave almost the same method but
> said it takes time and practise to perfect this.
>
> Can anyone else add any more to the above? When I first tried this
> whirlpool type method the white broke up too much - so I am doing
> something wrong!
>
> Thanx
>
> Daisy


Restaurants usually use a 'egg poacher'. Which is a metal device that
sits in the bottom of a pan with the boiling water up it's sides. Which
you crack the egg into. They are reasonably cheap to buy and their small
size allows easy storage.

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
Continuing to be Manitoban
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Daisy wrote:
> I love poached eggs and generally find them perfectly cooked at a

cafe
> or restaurant. I can't seem to get the same result!
>
> One of my cookbooks describes the method for poached eggs as follows:
> using a deep frypan three-quarter fill with water, and bring to a
> simmer, then add 1 tsp white vinegar. Using a wooden spoon, swirl
> the water until a gentle whirlpool is formed and then put the egg in
> the centre. Cook for 3-4 minutes. <snip>


Poaching eggs isn't difficult but you may need to practice with a few.
I poach eggs in simmering water in a skillet, and no longer use
vinegar. I also don't swirl the water....I think it tends to pull the
white apart and, anyway, I haven't found it necessary. I crack an egg
and holding it just above the water (finger tips are just about in the
water) allow the egg contents to slip slowly into the water. Almost
always the egg forms the oval shape, with a few tendrils of white
trailing around. When done take egg out with slotted spoon or slotted
spatula. If you wish you can trim egg of tendrils with a sharp knife
(but I never bother).

Just a few "rules" to follow for poached eggs:

1. Use -fresh- eggs, or what Julia Child would have called
"impeccably" fresh eggs. The whites of really fresh eggs hold together
while those not quite so fresh spread out.

2. Have your water simmering, which is a very light boil. A livelier
boil will tend to break the whites apart.

3. For best results the water should be about 2 inches in depth. A
little more doesn't make a difference while a little less might be too
shallow. I always slip a spatula under an egg I've just dropped in the
water just in case it touches bottom and sticks.

Don't be afraid of poaching eggs. Just practice a bit and you can
always eat your mistakes. :-)

Mac



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Or cheat a little.

Flat pan, boiling water, drop in some metal rings that are taller than
the level of the water -- like cookie cutters, or I have some ENglish
Muffin rings (which I gave up on trying to make English muffins

There is water inside the ring as well as out.
Maybe grease the inside of the ring. Then a lif over the top of the
pan, so the steam helps cook the tops of the eggs.

When they are ready, in very short time, use a slotted spatula to lift
each egg with its ring, remove to plate (or on toast, or whatever).
Remember the ring is hot so use tongs to remove ring.

Voila! It's done. If you like herb flavors on the egg (terragon, or
dill), these can be added as son as the egg is dropped into each ring,
to let the flavors meld.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Daisy
 
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On 6 Mar 2005 19:13:48 -0800, " >
wrote:

>Or cheat a little.
>
>Flat pan, boiling water, drop in some metal rings that are taller than
>the level of the water -- like cookie cutters, or I have some ENglish
>Muffin rings (which I gave up on trying to make English muffins
>
>There is water inside the ring as well as out.
>Maybe grease the inside of the ring. Then a lif over the top of the
>pan, so the steam helps cook the tops of the eggs.
>
>When they are ready, in very short time, use a slotted spatula to lift
>each egg with its ring, remove to plate (or on toast, or whatever).
>Remember the ring is hot so use tongs to remove ring.
>
>Voila! It's done. If you like herb flavors on the egg (terragon, or
>dill), these can be added as son as the egg is dropped into each ring,
>to let the flavors meld.


No, I didn't want to poach the eggs with any artificial aids. I have
any number of these rings/pans and I don't get the same result as
natural poached eggs. That was why I was seaking a resul for
naturally poached eggs. But thank you anyway.

Daisy
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Bob (this one)
 
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Daisy wrote:

> No, I didn't want to poach the eggs with any artificial aids.=20


How I do it at home for a few people (as opposed to a restaurant=20
brunch where we did hundreds)...

A greased, shallow skillet with about 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water in=20
the bottom. Bring to a full boil and turn the heat down to where the=20
water merely trembles (that's 185=B0F to 190=B0F. Break the egg into a=20
custard cup or other small vessel. Lower the cup tilted (but not=20
spilling the egg out) into the water slowly and gently. Let the egg=20
slide out into the water and slowly raise the cup out of the water.=20
The slow and gentle stuff is to minimize currents that will swirl the=20
egg around and generate streamers. This method will, as well, but=20
they'll be somewhat smaller.

The traditional way is to swirl the water to create a gentle whirlpool=20
in the middle and drop the egg into that. It works, but takes a bit of=20
a knack.

Greasing the skillet minimizes sticking of the eggs no matter which=20
approach you take. You can add salt, vinegar, lemon juice, a touch of=20
oil, worcestershire or none of the above to the water. Each has it's=20
supporters. None has the gospel.

> I was seaking a result for naturally poached eggs.


And now you have another one.

Pastorio

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Charles Gifford
 
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"Bob (this one)" > wrote in message
...
<snip>
A greased, shallow skillet with about 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water in
the bottom. Bring to a full boil and turn the heat down to where the
water merely trembles (that's 185F to 190F. Break the egg into a
custard cup or other small vessel. Lower the cup tilted (but not
spilling the egg out) into the water slowly and gently. Let the egg
slide out into the water and slowly raise the cup out of the water.
The slow and gentle stuff is to minimize currents that will swirl the
egg around and generate streamers. This method will, as well, but
they'll be somewhat smaller.
<snip>
________________________________

Bob, may intrude into your excellent post? Thank you! You are very generous.
If you hold that custard cup in the simmering water for a few moments before
the gentle pour into the water, the white will stiffen a little thus holding
it's constistuant parts together slightly.

Charlie


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Dimitri
 
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"Daisy" > wrote in message
...
>I love poached eggs and generally find them perfectly cooked at a cafe
> or restaurant. I can't seem to get the same result!
>
> One of my cookbooks describes the method for poached eggs as follows:
> using a deep frypan three-quarter fill with water, and bring to a
> simmer, then add 1 tsp white vinegar. Using a wooden spoon, swirl
> the water until a gentle whirlpool is formed and then put the egg in
> the centre. Cook for 3-4 minutes.
>
> Another variation on this is to add salt to the water, but the method
> was virtually the same. I asked the chef at a bistro recently where
> I had perfectly poached eggs, and he gave almost the same method but
> said it takes time and practise to perfect this.
>
> Can anyone else add any more to the above? When I first tried this
> whirlpool type method the white broke up too much - so I am doing
> something wrong!
>
> Thanx
>
> Daisy



Buy an egg poacher:

http://www.chefscatalog.com/store/ca...at000106&cmCat

Dimitri





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Bob (this one)
 
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Charles Gifford wrote:

> "Bob (this one)" > wrote in message
> ...
> <snip>
> A greased, shallow skillet with about 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water in
> the bottom. Bring to a full boil and turn the heat down to where the
> water merely trembles (that's 185=B0F to 190=B0F. Break the egg into a
> custard cup or other small vessel. Lower the cup tilted (but not
> spilling the egg out) into the water slowly and gently. Let the egg
> slide out into the water and slowly raise the cup out of the water.
> The slow and gentle stuff is to minimize currents that will swirl the
> egg around and generate streamers. This method will, as well, but
> they'll be somewhat smaller.
> <snip>
> ________________________________
>=20
> Bob, may intrude into your excellent post? Thank you! You are very gene=

rous.
> If you hold that custard cup in the simmering water for a few moments b=

efore
> the gentle pour into the water, the white will stiffen a little thus ho=

lding
> it's constistuant parts together slightly.


Good thought. I haven't done that but on the face of it, it makes sense.

Pastorio

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