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  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >, jem
> wrote:

> :-( Of course this makes me very unhappy. Fortunately I am being treated
> with oral medication for now, so am not getting needle sticks every day.
> I'm really going to have to change my lifestyle, which means my eating
> habits and more exercise (and losing 30 pounds. I'm 6'2" and the doctor
> wants me to get down to 200). Could people how have this email me some
> of their favorite recipes? Fortunately/Unfortunately I like about
> everything, savory, vegatables, pasta, starch and sweets. Favorite
> recipes, meals, snack suggestions would really be appreciated. Feel free
> to post here or email to me. Thanks.
>
> James


James, have you attended any cholesterol or diabetes education classes?
I'd start there. I'm currently in such a class and find it all pretty
interesting. Next class will have some recipes included. Check with
your local hospital's education department. Diet change and exercise
will get you lower numbers faster than just diet alone. I hate
exercising but joined the Y four months ago and survive only with a
headset -- otherwise it bores me to tears. I watch TV and/or listen to
tunes or news while stepping along.

I've been logging all that I ingest for three days now and know wherein
some of my demons lie. The fact that I have a big *appetite* is tough,
too. I may take up chewing gum more.

Good luck to you, Sir.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >, "Gabby"
> wrote:
(snip)
> I've tried telling him that, to no avail. Considering that just
> before he was diagnosed his eyesight went for a shit to such a point
> that he could no longer work, nor drive, you'd think he'd be less
> stupid -- but no. Both my grandfather and my uncle died from this,
> my grandfather after losing toes, my uncle after going blind and
> losing both legs. None of this makes an impression on my husband.


> Gabby


How's his life insurance policy?

Here's my considered opinion about all of it. It includes the
platitudes about "wanting to do it for yourself and not someone else."
I think a person needs either very serious self-discipline or an abiding
belief that life will be different (i.e., better) if they make the
sacrifices necessary for radical change and reform. If you don't
believe in your core that your life will be better, happier, more
pleasant, easier -- whatever you want to ascribe to that "better" , it's
really easy to lose focus on the task at hand and just say "to hell with
it." Having the serious self-discipline necessary to do what it takes
is, I think, at least partially dependent on that core belief.

The other thing, AFAICS, is that when you are not used to making
healthful choices, whether about food intake or exercise, and are faced
with having to do so, all you do is think about it -- what's the right
food to eat, what will my next meal consist of, how do I get the right
stuff in the right amount, etc. And having those thoughts always
lurking in either the forefront of back of your mind can be really
draining.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Hahabogus
 
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Melba's Jammin' > wrote in
:

> In article >, jem
> > wrote:
>
> > :-( Of course this makes me very unhappy. Fortunately I am being
> > :treated
> > with oral medication for now, so am not getting needle sticks
> > every day. I'm really going to have to change my lifestyle, which
> > means my eating habits and more exercise (and losing 30 pounds.
> > I'm 6'2" and the doctor wants me to get down to 200). Could people
> > how have this email me some of their favorite recipes?
> > Fortunately/Unfortunately I like about everything, savory,
> > vegatables, pasta, starch and sweets. Favorite recipes, meals,
> > snack suggestions would really be appreciated. Feel free to post
> > here or email to me. Thanks.
> >
> > James

>
> James, have you attended any cholesterol or diabetes education
> classes? I'd start there. I'm currently in such a class and find
> it all pretty interesting. Next class will have some recipes
> included. Check with your local hospital's education department.
> Diet change and exercise will get you lower numbers faster than just
> diet alone. I hate exercising but joined the Y four months ago and
> survive only with a headset -- otherwise it bores me to tears. I
> watch TV and/or listen to tunes or news while stepping along.
>
> I've been logging all that I ingest for three days now and know
> wherein some of my demons lie. The fact that I have a big
> *appetite* is tough, too. I may take up chewing gum more.
>
> Good luck to you, Sir.


I went to a diabetes educational dealie (3 4hr seminars)...They wanted me
to eat up to 45 grams of carbs per meal and watch my fat.

They wanted me to test only once or twice a day. I test 8-10 times a
day...before and 2 times after meals(1 hr and 2 hr),when I awake and just
random tests. How else can you know what's happening?


Do you know what 45 grams of carbs does to your Blood Glucose? ...It
causes a spike, a large increase. I eat 20-25 carbs a day. I do miss rice
though. Anytime your BG goes over 7.8mmol or 140mg/dl you cause permenent
damage to your body...Crud collects on your arteries walls or on your
nerve fibres, or on your optic nerve. Causing future blindness, nerve
damage, limb loss or heart attacks/strokes...No thank You...I'll stick to
my 20-25 carbs a day. That way I stay well under 6.0 mmol or 108 mg/dl.

A shocking stat 95% of type 2 smokers loose at least 1 limb. This isn't a
wimpy disease, it is a very evil condition. There are those who believe
type 2 is the main cause of heart disease. It is a hidden plague only one
in 10 sufferers know they have it.

I'll stop ranting/preaching now.


--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
Continuing to be Manitoban
  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gabby
 
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"Priscilla Ballou" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Gabby" > wrote:
>
>> "Nexis" > wrote in message
>> news:inBWd.155780$Yu.12460@fed1read01...
>> > At least he has the support of those around him. It's hard when people
>> > around you tell you that you're diabetic "by choice".

>>
>> Huh? Diabetic 'by choice'? That's a new one. How exactly does one
>> choose
>> to have one's islet cells stop producing insulin?

>
> I've always heard that we bring it on by picking the wrong grandparents.
>
> Priscilla, T2


There was absolutely no history of diabetes in hubby's family. After he was
diagnosed with type 2, his cousin's 4 month old daughter was diagnosed with
type 1.

Gabby


  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
jem
 
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Gal Called J.J. wrote:
> One time on Usenet, jem > said:
>
>
>>:-( Of course this makes me very unhappy. Fortunately I am being treated
>>with oral medication for now, so am not getting needle sticks every day.
>>I'm really going to have to change my lifestyle, which means my eating
>>habits and more exercise (and losing 30 pounds. I'm 6'2" and the doctor
>>wants me to get down to 200). Could people how have this email me some
>>of their favorite recipes? Fortunately/Unfortunately I like about
>>everything, savory, vegatables, pasta, starch and sweets. Favorite
>>recipes, meals, snack suggestions would really be appreciated. Feel free
>>to post here or email to me. Thanks.

>
>
> I was diagnosed as a Type 2 diabetic in Feb '04. I've lost 40
> pounds since then through lower calorie diet and walking 5-10 miles
> per week, and the disease is currently in remission (my HbA1C is a
> down from 9.1 to a mere 4.9 now, yay!). Rather than looking for specific
> recipes, I suggest you attend a nutrition class at your local hospital
> or clinic, if available. Cutting calories and learning to count carb
> units let me continue to eat carbs, just not in the quantities that I
> was consuming them in the past. You can get a lot of great information
> about this in alt.support.diet and alt.support.diet.low-carb. Best of
> luck... :-)
>

I am scheduled to meet with a dietician at my doctor's office the week
after next, but am trying to get started already. My brother-in-law does
the carb counting and it seems to work pretty well for him. Oh, and I
have to quit smoking, too. I will not buy any more, am down to 8-9
cigarettes/day right now.


  #46 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >/church lady ON
> >
> >Could it be.... genetic mutation?
> >
> >/church lady OFF

>
> ROFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Are you a mutant, Priscilla?


Nope! Or at least you couldn't prove it by my diabetes. I come by it
honestly -- most of the people on my father's side of the family
developed it.

Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
that is traceable, too.

Priscilla
--
"And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work." - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #47 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article >,
Hahabogus > wrote:

> Priscilla Ballou > wrote in
> :
>
> > In article >,
> > Wayne Boatwright > wrote:
> >
> > > On Sun 06 Mar 2005 09:37:50a, Priscilla Ballou wrote in
> > > rec.food.cooking:
> > >
> > > > In article >,
> > > > "Gabby" > wrote:
> > > >
> > > >> "Nexis" > wrote in message
> > > >> news:inBWd.155780$Yu.12460@fed1read01...
> > > >> > At least he has the support of those around him. It's hard
> > > >> > when people around you tell you that you're diabetic "by
> > > >> > choice".
> > > >>
> > > >> Huh? Diabetic 'by choice'? That's a new one. How exactly
> > > >> does one choose to have one's islet cells stop producing
> > > >> insulin?
> > > >
> > > > I've always heard that we bring it on by picking the wrong
> > > > grandparents.
> > > >
> > > > Priscilla, T2
> > >
> > > None of my grandparents nor my parents were diabetic. AFAIK, I'm
> > > the only one in my entire family who is diabetic, T2.

> >
> > Hmmm.
> >
> > /church lady ON
> >
> > Could it be.... genetic mutation?
> >
> > /church lady OFF
> >
> > Priscilla

>
> T2 was 'discovered' in the fifties. So possibly you are just the first
> confirmed case in your family.


No, no, plenty of people in my family with diabetes... possibly they
just didn't know it was type 2 until the 50s, but they knew it was
diabetes all right. I once saw my great-grandfather's insulin syringe.

> Or the others died from strokes/heart
> attacks before they were diagnosed. The Glucose level required for
> diagnosing as type 2 is not a constant. In the UK it is in the high 6's
> mmol or below 115 mg/dl. In North America is has recently been lowered to
> 7.0 mmol or 128 ish mg/dl.


126 for DM, 100 for "pre-diabetes," which I refer to as "early diabetes."

> Some doctors aren't aware of this. Some doctors aren't up to speed with
> the treatment/diet/drugs for T2's.


My endo is. I had to fire my internist, though. She wouldn't let me
have metformin because I was strenuously low-carbing and keeping my
numbers in the normal range. She said I didn't need it. Apparently she
hadn't heard of metformin's cardiac protective effect, and she wasn't
going to let a patient of hers teach her anything. So I fired her ass.

Priscilla
--
"And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work." - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >If it weren't for the high cholesterol part, I would say Adkin's Diet
> >plus exercise. (BTW, I don't believe Adkin's's a normally good weight
> >loss program, but I'm naturally a skeptic about such things.) It might
> >be a good way to go even with the high cholesterol if you monitor it
> >closely and switch to something else if your LDL goes up instead of
> >down. I suspect the cholesterol will go down by itself as you lose
> >weight, and Adkin's diet should be great for diabetics -- and my brother
> >has lost 60 or more pounds on high protein with very low carbohydrates.

>
> Atkins is GREAT for high cholesterol. Here's a copy of a post I made to
> the low-carb group, before I fell off the wagon. I'd lost 40 pounds.
>
> This is the difference from November of 2002 to April of 2003:
>
> Total Cholesterol from 195 to 167
> HDL from 44 to 52
> LDL from 117 to 91
> Ratio from 2.7 to 1.7
> Triglycerides from 168 to 121
>
> Low carb is the way to go. (BTW, Atkins isn't a high protein diet. It's
> high fat sufficient protein, and low carb)


Carol is correct.

Priscilla
--
"And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work." - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #49 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
>that is traceable, too.


On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
granddaughter.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #50 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ted Campanelli
 
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Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
so great) words of knowledge:

Congratulations on giving up smoking !! I wish I could give it up. I
have tried several times and finally decided smoking was less of a
hazard than an upset wife and/or divorce.

> Gal Called J.J. wrote:
>> One time on Usenet, jem > said:
>>
>>
>>>:-( Of course this makes me very unhappy. Fortunately I am being treated
>>>with oral medication for now, so am not getting needle sticks every day.
>>>I'm really going to have to change my lifestyle, which means my eating
>>>habits and more exercise (and losing 30 pounds. I'm 6'2" and the doctor
>>>wants me to get down to 200). Could people how have this email me some
>>>of their favorite recipes? Fortunately/Unfortunately I like about
>>>everything, savory, vegatables, pasta, starch and sweets. Favorite
>>>recipes, meals, snack suggestions would really be appreciated. Feel free
>>>to post here or email to me. Thanks.

>>
>>
>> I was diagnosed as a Type 2 diabetic in Feb '04. I've lost 40
>> pounds since then through lower calorie diet and walking 5-10 miles
>> per week, and the disease is currently in remission (my HbA1C is a
>> down from 9.1 to a mere 4.9 now, yay!). Rather than looking for specific
>> recipes, I suggest you attend a nutrition class at your local hospital
>> or clinic, if available. Cutting calories and learning to count carb
>> units let me continue to eat carbs, just not in the quantities that I
>> was consuming them in the past. You can get a lot of great information
>> about this in alt.support.diet and alt.support.diet.low-carb. Best of
>> luck... :-)
>>

> I am scheduled to meet with a dietician at my doctor's office the week
> after next, but am trying to get started already. My brother-in-law does
> the carb counting and it seems to work pretty well for him. Oh, and I
> have to quit smoking, too. I will not buy any more, am down to 8-9
> cigarettes/day right now.



  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Goomba38
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 01:45:59p, Goomba38 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>
>>Ted Campanelli wrote:
>>. My wife is an RN AND a Certified Holistic Nurse.
>>
>>certified by whom??
>>Goomba

>
>
> Dunno, but somebody must. My doctor, an osteopath, is certified as a
> holistic specialist. The diplomas/certificates say so, but I've never paid
> attention to the details.


Oh I love working with D.O.'s.. they're great
doctors. But I've never seen a established
certification as a "Holistic Nurse" before...and
I'm a nurse!? Just wasn't sure if this was through
ANA/ANCC or one of the large national nursing
credential sources or some fly by night mail order
group? It's a new one to me. That's all?
Goomba

  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Goomba38
 
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Ted Campanelli wrote:


>>> Ted Campanelli wrote:
>>> . My wife is an RN AND a Certified Holistic Nurse.
>>>
>>> certified by whom??
>>> Goomba

>>
>>
>> Dunno, but somebody must. My doctor, an osteopath, is certified as a
>> holistic specialist. The diplomas/certificates say so, but I've never
>> paid attention to the details.
>>

>
> Certified by the National Board of Holistic Nurses. This is a bonifide
> organization with very high standards that is recognized by MOST medical
> organizations and medical practitioners. I am not sure if it is
> recognized by the AMA. But then the AMA often takes 15 - 20 years to
> recognize and accept medicines and medical procedures that are in common
> use in other countries.


See? This is the weird thing- Nurses don't answer
to the AMA, or to doctors. We answer to our own
board of nursing. Nurses don't work under the
medical model, rather from the Nursing model. What
the AMA does or does not do has *nothing* to do
with nurses and nursing.
Goomba

  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
> >that is traceable, too.

>
> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
> granddaughter.


On my mother's side, the long finger (between index finger and ring
finger, oh, right, it's also called the middle finger) curves out
towards the pinkie, and, when I hold out my hand flat with fingers
together, it slides a little under the ring finger. My mother has the
same, but not my sister.

Priscilla, mutant
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #54 (permalink)   Report Post  
zxcvbob
 
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Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
>
>>Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
>>that is traceable, too.

>
>
> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
> granddaughter.
>
> Carol



She was checking to see if it was really yours ;;-)

Best regards,
Bob
  #55 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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zxcvbob >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>>>Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
>>>that is traceable, too.

>>
>> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
>> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
>> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
>> granddaughter.
>>
>> Carol

>
>She was checking to see if it was really yours ;;-)


I'm pretty sure that I'm not the mother.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


  #56 (permalink)   Report Post  
biig
 
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First of all....did you see a dietician? Here in Ontario Canada
there is a diabetic clinic at the local hospital that has a nurse and
dietician who hold a seminar and lay out the diabetic diet plan. It is
very simple and you don't starve. I've lost 45 or more pounds on it and
have, over the years, modified it a bit to include some of the things I
didn't eat in the beginning. The down side is that a lot of sauces etc.
are not allowed except in moderation. You basically have to trade off
some things to get a forbidden item occasionally. HTH....Sharon

jem wrote:
>
> :-( Of course this makes me very unhappy. Fortunately I am being treated
> with oral medication for now, so am not getting needle sticks every day.
> I'm really going to have to change my lifestyle, which means my eating
> habits and more exercise (and losing 30 pounds. I'm 6'2" and the doctor
> wants me to get down to 200). Could people how have this email me some
> of their favorite recipes? Fortunately/Unfortunately I like about
> everything, savory, vegatables, pasta, starch and sweets. Favorite
> recipes, meals, snack suggestions would really be appreciated. Feel free
> to post here or email to me. Thanks.
>
> James

  #57 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>In article >,
> Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>
>> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>> >Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
>> >that is traceable, too.

>>
>> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
>> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
>> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
>> granddaughter.

>
>On my mother's side, the long finger (between index finger and ring
>finger, oh, right, it's also called the middle finger) curves out
>towards the pinkie, and, when I hold out my hand flat with fingers
>together, it slides a little under the ring finger. My mother has the
>same, but not my sister.
>
>Priscilla, mutant


I TOLD you that you were a mutant! But would you believe me? NOOOOO!

Carol, whose second toe is shorter than the big one
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #58 (permalink)   Report Post  
Fudge
 
Posts: n/a
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Cheer up. Medical technology has got this killer figured out. In five years,
you will be able to have some stem cells injected into your buggered up
pancreas and those magic cells will be regenerated. If this technology
really works, everybody can get replacement body parts. Need a new liver,
penis or heart? Just like replacing the parts in your car. You could also
clone a replacement James without a brain and use the dummy for spare parts.
Until then do what the doctors say.

F.J.


  #60 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Melba's Jammin' >, if that's their real name,
wrote:

>In article >,
wrote:
>
>> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>>
>> >Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
>> >that is traceable, too.

>>
>> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
>> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
>> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
>> granddaughter.
>>
>> Carol

>
>Was that to make certain she was yours? "-)


Yes, and it was determined that I am not the mother.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


  #61 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
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"Damsel in dis Dress" > wrote

>>> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
>>> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger.
>>> That
>>> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
>>> granddaughter.


> Yes, and it was determined that I am not the mother.


The question is, do you have attached earlobes and can you curl your
tongue.

nancy


  #62 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
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In article >,
"Fudge" > wrote:

> Cheer up. Medical technology has got this killer figured out. In five years,
> you will be able to have some stem cells injected into your buggered up
> pancreas and those magic cells will be regenerated.


Just to be burned out again from insulin resistance? That's a T1
solution, not a T2 one.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #63 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
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In article >,
Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:

> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >In article >,
> > Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
> >
> >> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
> >>
> >> >Now, I've got these fingers that are bent funny, but the inheritance of
> >> >that is traceable, too.
> >>
> >> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
> >> furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger. That
> >> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
> >> granddaughter.

> >
> >On my mother's side, the long finger (between index finger and ring
> >finger, oh, right, it's also called the middle finger) curves out
> >towards the pinkie, and, when I hold out my hand flat with fingers
> >together, it slides a little under the ring finger. My mother has the
> >same, but not my sister.
> >
> >Priscilla, mutant

>
> I TOLD you that you were a mutant! But would you believe me? NOOOOO!


My cover is blown.

> Carol, whose second toe is shorter than the big one


OK. You made me take off my shoe to check. Of course your second toe
is shorter than your big toe. Isn't everyone's? Mine is.

This isn't one of those "you're *** if..." things, is it? If so, I
should lack somewhat in the symetry department. ;-)

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #67 (permalink)   Report Post  
Hahabogus
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Nancy Young" > wrote in
:

>
> "Damsel in dis Dress" > wrote
>
> >>> On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward
> >>> at the furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the
> >>> ring finger. That
> >>> was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
> >>> granddaughter.

>
> > Yes, and it was determined that I am not the mother.

>
> The question is, do you have attached earlobes and can you curl your
> tongue.
>
> nancy
>
>
>


My earlobes are semi-attached...I keep them in a mint tin by the bed,
when not in use. What did you say?

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
Continuing to be Manitoban
  #68 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>In article >,
> Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>
>> Carol, whose second toe is shorter than the big one

>
>OK. You made me take off my shoe to check. Of course your second toe
>is shorter than your big toe. Isn't everyone's? Mine is.


I think it's just you and me. Everyone else whose feet I've seen have
second toes that are longer than the big one.
(Okay, everyone take your shoes off)

>This isn't one of those "you're *** if..." things, is it? If so, I
>should lack somewhat in the symetry department. ;-)


LOL! You're a mutant if ....

Carol, mutant
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #69 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Nancy Young" >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>The question is, do you have attached earlobes and can you curl your
>tongue.


I have dangling earlobes, and very tall ears, if that makes any sense.
They're not little cute round ears.

Yes, I can curl my tongue, and yes, I can tie a knot in a cherry stem.

Carol, mult-talented
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
  #70 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hahabogus >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>Priscilla Ballou > wrote in news:vze23t8n-
:
>
>> OK. You made me take off my shoe to check. Of course your second toe
>> is shorter than your big toe. Isn't everyone's? Mine is.

>
>OMG!!! Mine is longer...I must be the mutant.


Naw, I think that, for once in your life, you're normal.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_


  #71 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dan Goodman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Priscilla Ballou >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
>>In article >,
>>Damsel in dis Dress > wrote:
>>
>>>Carol, whose second toe is shorter than the big one

>>
>>OK. You made me take off my shoe to check. Of course your second toe
>>is shorter than your big toe. Isn't everyone's? Mine is.

>
> I think it's just you and me. Everyone else whose feet I've seen have
> second toes that are longer than the big one.
> (Okay, everyone take your shoes off)


It's considered relatively unusual to have longer second toes. Look up
"Greek feet".

I have one of each; second toe on my right foot is longer.


--
Dan Goodman
Journal http://www.livejournal.com/users/dsgood/
Decluttering: http://decluttering.blogspot.com
Predictions and Politics http://dsgood.blogspot.com
All political parties die at last of swallowing their own lies.
John Arbuthnot (1667-1735), Scottish writer, physician.
  #72 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nexis
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Damsel in dis Dress" > wrote in message
...
> "Nexis" >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
> >At least he has the support of those around him. It's hard when people
> >around you tell you that you're diabetic "by choice".

>
> WHAT??? People have actually said that to you? How moronic can people
> be? Un<bleeping>believable.
>
> Carol
> --


Two, yes. And they also argue with me telling me that it is "curable". I've
tried to explain that, while it's controllable, it is not curable....to no
end. It is difficult to deal with when you already feel like you're to
blame. Logically, I know it's not the truth. Logically, I know with my
grandmother, my father, my sister and my brother all diabetics (and that's
just immediate family) that it was likely to happen, at some point. But,
emotions aren't really reliant on logic right?
It did help when my doctor told me that it was not fair to me to blame
myself, and that, given my family history, there wasn't a lot I could do to
avoid it that I wasn't already doing. I was just lucky that I caught it when
I did, I guess. I drove out to Minnesota with my mom, and at some point
during the trip I began having pain in my back. I thought, silly me, that it
was the extensive days spent in the car driving. By the time I got home, it
felt like someone had kicked me repeatedly in the back. Turned out it was a
severe kidney infection. I was tested shortly after that, since that was how
my dad found out.

kimberly


  #73 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nexis
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"jem" > wrote in message
...
> :-( Of course this makes me very unhappy. Fortunately I am being treated
> with oral medication for now, so am not getting needle sticks every day.
> I'm really going to have to change my lifestyle, which means my eating
> habits and more exercise (and losing 30 pounds. I'm 6'2" and the doctor
> wants me to get down to 200). Could people how have this email me some
> of their favorite recipes? Fortunately/Unfortunately I like about
> everything, savory, vegatables, pasta, starch and sweets. Favorite
> recipes, meals, snack suggestions would really be appreciated. Feel free
> to post here or email to me. Thanks.
>
> James


James,

First, let me just say you are not alone! Lots of diabetics have high
cholesterol and many also have high blood pressure.
The best advice I can think of is something you're already doing. Ask
questions! Take time to learn about your situation, and don't rely on old,
and often wrong, information. Get thee to a nutritionist or dietician. Test,
test, test. Every diabetic is different in the foods that they can tolerate
and those they can't. My dad can't eat any potatoes without high BG's going
through the roof. I, on the other hand, can have small portions of yukon
potatoes, provided I eat them with protein and a little fat. And that's just
one example. The only way to really know how foods are going to affect you
is to test your blood glucose levels after eating them. Of course,
vegetables are going to be better for you than say, chocolate cake. But
don't feel you can never have anything like a slice of chocolate cake again.
The fastest way to feel overwhelmed, IMO, is to start thinking about all of
the limitations in what you can eat and not eat.
Exercise will help in both areas, which is kinda cool if you ask me. Walking
is my favorite activity, especially at the beach. If you take medication,
though, you will need to be careful and monitor your BG levels when
exercising. It took me a while to get the right plan of when to eat and what
to eat when exercising to avoid dropping too low.
As far as food goes, I've found in general it helps me to think of it like
this: if I stick to fresh, natural foods, I'm usually right on target with
my BG levels. The more something is processed, the worse it will be for me.
So, Twinkies would definitely be a big resounding NO! (Of course, they would
be any, nasty little things). Good luck, and keep us posted!

kimberly


  #74 (permalink)   Report Post  
jem
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ted Campanelli wrote:
> Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
> so great) words of knowledge:
>
> Congratulations on giving up smoking !! I wish I could give it up. I
> have tried several times and finally decided smoking was less of a
> hazard than an upset wife and/or divorce.


I'm not there yet, but ramping down nicely. I'm not buying any more
cigs. I was at about a pack a day one week ago and smoked 8 yesterday.
It's easier than the diet changes. :-(
  #75 (permalink)   Report Post  
jem
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Fudge wrote:
> Cheer up. Medical technology has got this killer figured out. In five years,
> you will be able to have some stem cells injected into your buggered up
> pancreas and those magic cells will be regenerated. If this technology
> really works, everybody can get replacement body parts. Need a new liver,
> penis or heart? Just like replacing the parts in your car. You could also
> clone a replacement James without a brain and use the dummy for spare parts.
> Until then do what the doctors say.
>
> F.J.
>
>

Well, if it's a true clone then the replacement would be a dummy for
sure. I don't think the problem with type II is the Pancreas, is it? I
thought it was more with the liver and how effectively the body used the
insulin and bg that are present, right? (Is bg correct? See, I'm already
picking up on the lingo).


  #76 (permalink)   Report Post  
jem
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Nancy Young wrote:
> "Damsel in dis Dress" > wrote
>
>
>>>>On my mom's side of the family, the pinky fingers curve outward at the
>>>>furthermost knuckle, and they fit perfectly against the ring finger.
>>>>That
>>>>was the very first thing my mom checked when I gave birth to her
>>>>granddaughter.

>
>
>>Yes, and it was determined that I am not the mother.

>
>
> The question is, do you have attached earlobes and can you curl your
> tongue.
>
> nancy
>
>


I can curl my tongue and spread my toes. I also 'hold my tongue right'
when I'm concentrating, so that makes me ligitimate in my family.
  #78 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gabby
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Damsel in dis Dress" > wrote in message
...
> "Nancy Young" >, if that's their real name, wrote:
>
>>The question is, do you have attached earlobes and can you curl your
>>tongue.

>
> I have dangling earlobes, and very tall ears, if that makes any sense.
> They're not little cute round ears.
>
> Yes, I can curl my tongue, and yes, I can tie a knot in a cherry stem.


Isn't the study of genetics fascinating?! Hubby, daughter, sons & I can all
curl our tongues, but the youngest son can fold his so that the tip looks
like a clover. None of us can figure out how he does it.

Gabby


  #79 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
jem > wrote:

> I don't think the problem with type II is the Pancreas, is it? I
> thought it was more with the liver and how effectively the body used the
> insulin and bg that are present, right? (Is bg correct? See, I'm already
> picking up on the lingo).


True, the problem with insulin resistance comes first, but it
overstresses the pancreas and eventually burns out the beta cells, if
there's no intervention. That intervention can be in the form of
decreasing insulin resistance (through diet, exercise, meds, weight
loss, etc.) or of injecting exogenous insulin in order to take the load
off the pancreas. That's the simplified answer.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #80 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dan Abel
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article <C8bXd.1167$uk7.608@fed1read01>, "Nexis" > wrote:

> "Damsel in dis Dress" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Nexis" >, if that's their real name, wrote:


> > >At least he has the support of those around him. It's hard when people
> > >around you tell you that you're diabetic "by choice".


> > WHAT??? People have actually said that to you? How moronic can people
> > be? Un<bleeping>believable.


> > Carol



> Two, yes. And they also argue with me telling me that it is "curable". I've
> tried to explain that, while it's controllable, it is not curable....to no



I think I'd be looking for some new people to be around me, with support
like that. I've taken a couple of classes in diabetes management, and
it's reassuring to have a whole room full of diabetics (including the
instructors), all Type II.

--
Dan Abel
Sonoma State University
AIS

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