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Old 05-03-2005, 09:31 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default Wooden Cutting Board Cleaning Tip

I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it evenly
over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day, rinse
thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any excess
cleanser.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on the
board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final quick rinse
under warm water and let dry.

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this for
reference.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974

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Old 06-03-2005, 12:03 AM
Katra
 
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Default

In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it evenly
over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day, rinse
thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any excess
cleanser.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on the
board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final quick rinse
under warm water and let dry.

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this for
reference.


Cool tips! :-)

For mine, I just scrub it off with warm soapy water from the dishpan
every time I'm done using it and set it upright to dry.

When it starts getting dark or stained, I spread lemon juice over the
board and let it sit for awhile, then wash/rinse as usual. I've found
that lemon juice bleaches it nicely without damaging the wood.

I guess the salt might be a better sanitizer tho'?

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

,,Cat's Haven Hobby Farm,,Katraatcenturyteldotnet,,


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Old 06-03-2005, 12:24 AM
Kenneth
 
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Default

On 5 Mar 2005 21:31:37 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it evenly
over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day, rinse
thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any excess
cleanser.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on the
board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final quick rinse
under warm water and let dry.

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this for
reference.


Howdy,

For plastic, the dishwasher is probably the way to go.

For wood, the above is certainly over-kill (and would damage
the surface of the board.)

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 06-03-2005, 12:53 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default

On Sat 05 Mar 2005 04:24:51p, Kenneth wrote in rec.food.cooking:

On 5 Mar 2005 21:31:37 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it
evenly over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day,
rinse thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any
excess cleanser.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on
the board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final quick
rinse under warm water and let dry.

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this
for reference.


Howdy,

For plastic, the dishwasher is probably the way to go.

For wood, the above is certainly over-kill (and would damage
the surface of the board.)

All the best,


My poly and nylon boards go in the D/W after every use.

The treatment for wood was suggested for only occasional use. I doubt this
would do much damage when done infrequently.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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Old 06-03-2005, 02:08 AM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Default

In article ,
Kenneth wrote:

For plastic, the dishwasher is probably the way to go.

For wood, the above is certainly over-kill (and would damage
the surface of the board.)


Indeed. I'd worry about interfering with its ability to kill salmonella.

Priscilla
--
"And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work." - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal


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Old 06-03-2005, 04:42 AM
 
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Default

I wouldn't use cleanser on a wood board. Yikes! Do you know what it
tastes like? You will.

I learned by sad experience that repeated water and soap washings, even
if "wiped off and set on end to dry," the wood will absorb the water
even after you wipe it up, and eventually warp and split along the
joins, if it is butcher block.

I learned from a caterer the "ten percent solution" actually required
by health dept inspectors. Keep a squirt container of bleach water,
one tenth bleach and nine tenths water. Wipe off your board and
counters with paper towels to remove obvious residue. (Remember your
kitchen sponge and dishcloth contain more bacteria than you bathroom
surfaces - but that's another thred in the past.)

Then squirt the bleach/water solution on your board and countertops.
Wipe with more paper towels. .Wipe dry with (third) paper towels.
Any remaining bleach that you smell is really in the air, not on the
surface. But if you wish, rinse again with more towels slightly
dampened with water - but remember that at this stage you are really
applying, not removing, fresh bacteria.

And, oh yes. Lemon is nice. It smells nice. Looks pretty. Doesn't
do a bit of cleaning.

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Old 06-03-2005, 06:18 AM
Bob (this one)
 
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Default

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it evenly
over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day, rinse
thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any excess
cleanser.


Essentially, this is concentratedly bleaching the wood and it will do
several undesirable things: It will raise the grain and make the wood
rough. It will penetrate the wood and flavor foods cut on it. It will
pull out any oil that's preserving the wood.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on the
board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final quick rinse
under warm water and let dry.


Jeez, this is harsh and unnecessary. The salt acts as an abrasive and
the lemon juice is just more of (a different) bleach. This will
aggravate the first step's injuries even more without adding any
sanitizing value.

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.


Sanitizing is a lot easier than that. A 5% bleach solution will do the
same thing with less damage to the wood. I note that there's no
instruction about smoothing the wood after the treatments above. This
advice is seriously suspect. The wood will be showing splinters after
this procedure.

The best sanitizer and oxygen bleaching technique I've seen and used
is to spray white vinegar and peroxide from different containers
simultaneously onto the board surface. Let sit for a few minutes,
wipe, rinse and let air dry. The combination of the two sanitizes as
well as or better than bleach. And it's less damaging to the wood.
Leaves no taste on the wood and no harsh smell in the air.

And the boards should be oiled to keep the surface a bit more
impermeable to liquids. I use any oil but olive but there are
crusaders who say that it will become rancid and your hair will fall
out and other dire predictions. They say that only mineral oil will
do. My experience days otherwise. That works for furniture, not
cutting boards. I have a pecan wood cutting board in my kitchen that
my grandfather made more than a century ago and it's been oiled with
whatever oil was at hand, including olive back in the day. It smells
clean and appetizing.

When they get rough from all that cutting, a little sandpaper or, for
those in the restaurant biz, a grill screen will take down the surface
a tiny bit and restore the smoothness.

That whole argument about whether they're antibacterial still rages
with neither side producing any convincing evidence. Best to think
they're not and treat them accordingly. This is one bet you don't want
to lose.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this for
reference.


Those boards profit from a dishwashing machine. That's where mine go.
Come out clean and sanitized.

Pastorio

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Old 06-03-2005, 06:42 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default

On Sat 05 Mar 2005 10:18:16p, Bob (this one) wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it
evenly over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day,
rinse thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any
excess cleanser.


Essentially, this is concentratedly bleaching the wood and it will do
several undesirable things: It will raise the grain and make the wood
rough. It will penetrate the wood and flavor foods cut on it. It will
pull out any oil that's preserving the wood.


Perhaps so, I never tried it. We've never used cleanser or bleach.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on
the board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final
quick rinse under warm water and let dry.


Jeez, this is harsh and unnecessary. The salt acts as an abrasive and
the lemon juice is just more of (a different) bleach. This will
aggravate the first step's injuries even more without adding any
sanitizing value.


I can't agree with this being destructive. My mother had the same maple
cutting board for her entire married life and beyond, nearly 60 years. She
routinely sprinkled it with salt and rubbed it with a lemon. I have the
board now, and it's no worse for wear, although I don't use it. I don't
like wood. My kitchen moto is, "if it can't go in the dishwasher, it
simply doesn't get used."

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.


Sanitizing is a lot easier than that. A 5% bleach solution will do the
same thing with less damage to the wood. I note that there's no
instruction about smoothing the wood after the treatments above. This
advice is seriously suspect. The wood will be showing splinters after
this procedure.


There is nary a splinter in my mother's old board after countless
salt/lemon scrubbings.

The best sanitizer and oxygen bleaching technique I've seen and used
is to spray white vinegar and peroxide from different containers
simultaneously onto the board surface. Let sit for a few minutes,
wipe, rinse and let air dry. The combination of the two sanitizes as
well as or better than bleach. And it's less damaging to the wood.
Leaves no taste on the wood and no harsh smell in the air.


This sounds like the best solution yet.

And the boards should be oiled to keep the surface a bit more
impermeable to liquids. I use any oil but olive but there are
crusaders who say that it will become rancid and your hair will fall
out and other dire predictions. They say that only mineral oil will
do. My experience days otherwise. That works for furniture, not
cutting boards. I have a pecan wood cutting board in my kitchen that
my grandfather made more than a century ago and it's been oiled with
whatever oil was at hand, including olive back in the day. It smells
clean and appetizing.


Mom always oiled her cutting board after practically every use, or at least
after contact with liquid. I think she usually used vegetable oil.

When they get rough from all that cutting, a little sandpaper or, for
those in the restaurant biz, a grill screen will take down the surface
a tiny bit and restore the smoothness.

That whole argument about whether they're antibacterial still rages
with neither side producing any convincing evidence. Best to think
they're not and treat them accordingly. This is one bet you don't want
to lose.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this
for reference.


Those boards profit from a dishwashing machine. That's where mine go.
Come out clean and sanitized.


My poly and nulon boards go in the D/W after every use. I think they're
safe.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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Old 06-03-2005, 07:32 AM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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"aem" , if that's their real name, wrote:

wrote:
[snip]
And, oh yes. Lemon is nice. It smells nice. Looks pretty.

Doesn't
do a bit of cleaning.


What!? How can that be!? Do you have any idea how many millions of
advertising dollars have been spent to embed in our minds the equation
Lemon = Clean = Fresh = wonderful for everything in the
laundry/bath/kitchen?!

You are a heretic.


Yeah, everyone knows that it's either pine or orange that cleans.

Carol
--
"Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
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Old 06-03-2005, 01:07 PM
Kenneth
 
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On 6 Mar 2005 06:42:09 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

Mom always oiled her cutting board after practically every use, or at least
after contact with liquid. I think she usually used vegetable oil.


Howdy,

If so, she was lucky that she did not lose the board to
rancidity... Mineral oil (from the pharmacy) is a much
better choice.

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 06-03-2005, 01:33 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default

On Sun 06 Mar 2005 05:07:07a, Kenneth wrote in rec.food.cooking:

On 6 Mar 2005 06:42:09 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

Mom always oiled her cutting board after practically every use, or at
least after contact with liquid. I think she usually used vegetable
oil.


Howdy,

If so, she was lucky that she did not lose the board to
rancidity... Mineral oil (from the pharmacy) is a much
better choice.

All the best,


It probably never had a chance. :-) The board was used daily, washed
daily, and oiled probably every few times after washing. It never sat
around long without use and allowing the oil to become old.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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Old 06-03-2005, 05:06 PM
Phred
 
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To my mind, the most important thing with porous boards such as wooden
ones, is to limit the amount of grot that soaks into it. To achieve
this, my personal preference is simply to wet the board with tap water
before each use, and rinse it off quickly with hot water after. It
then gets washed before the dishes (but usually after the plonk
glasses at the usual time -- and given a bit of a scrub with a nail
brush. I've been using the same 12" bit of 7" by 1/2" pine plank for
about 40 years without problems. (Mind you, it doesn't *look* the
best these days, but neither does anything else 40 years older.)

In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I just caught this on the tube, for periodic cutting board cleaning:

Make a paste of dry cleanser (such as Comet), and water. Spread it evenly
over the cutting surface and allow to dry overnight. Next day, rinse
thoroughly under warm water using a paper towel to rub off any excess
cleanser.

Sprinkle wet cutting board liberally with Kosher salt. Scour salt on the
board with a half lemon until salt is dissolved. Give a final quick rinse
under warm water and let dry.

This is said to sanitize and remove stains.

Since I use polypropylene and nylon cutting boards, I'll just keep this for
reference.


Cheers, Phred.

--
LID

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Old 06-03-2005, 05:32 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Default

In article . com,
" wrote:

I learned by sad experience that repeated water and soap washings, even
if "wiped off and set on end to dry," the wood will absorb the water
even after you wipe it up, and eventually warp and split along the
joins, if it is butcher block.


I acquired two long narrow cutting boards by that method. Actually,
they're very useful. ;-)

Priscilla
--
"And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work." - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal


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