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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
TheAlligator
 
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Default Care and Feeding of the carbon-steel wok

After the day you unpack it and wash with
detergent, NEVER let soap of any kind touch your wok again - EVER.
Not if it's a plain carbon-steel wok - you didn't get any other kind,
I hope. While eating, let it soak full of very hot water. Use a
plastic scraper (we use the one intended for cleaning a baking stone)
and carefully and gently remove all rough bits to smooth it down.
Rinse thoroughly and repeat the scraping and rinsing if you need to.
Dry it off somewhat, place on a burner on HIGH to evaporate all the
moisture. Let cool a bit. Take a paper towel, pour in about a tsp of
oil, swirl it around with the towel to coat completely the interior.
Put back on the high heat until it starts to smoke, then remove and
cool. Take another wad of paper towel, run it all over the inside,
make sure there is no pooling of oil in the bottom, cover and store.
If you do this, you will enjoy this wok more 10 years down the road
than you do now.
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
elaine
 
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Default

"TheAlligator" > wrote in message
...
> After the day you unpack it and wash with
> detergent, NEVER let soap of any kind touch your wok again - EVER.
> Not if it's a plain carbon-steel wok - you didn't get any other kind,
> I hope. While eating, let it soak full of very hot water. Use a
> plastic scraper (we use the one intended for cleaning a baking stone)
> and carefully and gently remove all rough bits to smooth it down.
> Rinse thoroughly and repeat the scraping and rinsing if you need to.
> Dry it off somewhat, place on a burner on HIGH to evaporate all the
> moisture. Let cool a bit. Take a paper towel, pour in about a tsp of
> oil, swirl it around with the towel to coat completely the interior.
> Put back on the high heat until it starts to smoke, then remove and
> cool. Take another wad of paper towel, run it all over the inside,
> make sure there is no pooling of oil in the bottom, cover and store.
> If you do this, you will enjoy this wok more 10 years down the road
> than you do now.


Thank you for this info. I bought one a couple of days ago and have used it
twice. I knew not to use soap to clean it, but wasn't sure about using
water or if I should even be scraping it. A bit concerned though, about
eating bits of previous meals!

Now I can go and soak it in water, scrape and do the oil thing.

Elaine


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
TheAlligator
 
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Default

"elaine" > wrote:
>A bit concerned though, about
>eating bits of previous meals!

I know, I had trouble with the idea myself. Got this info from a
friend, the family are Cambodian immigrants, and he runs a "Chinese"
resturant locally. As long as you use really hot water, scrape
carefully (don't be too strong, or you'll ruin it - just scrape
carefully and slowly in water until it feels smooth again), and i
forgot to mention that after scraping, I refill it with hot water to
the brim, and once I'm able to put my hand in it without screaming,
run a washrag all over it quite a few times, to remove the prior
greasiness - you will be safe. If you don't get rid of the final
pooling of oil, as I mentioned, and don't use the wok for a long time,
it could go rancid on you. In which case, you pretty much follow the
same process before you use it again. Mine has only sat long enough
for that to happen one time, after an extended illness. I have been
using this procedure on one wok for about 15 years - I guess it's
really nothing more than the equivalent of seasoning a cast-iron
skillet.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
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TheAlligator wrote:
> "elaine" > wrote:
> >A bit concerned though, about
> >eating bits of previous meals!


Heat is a useful thing for getting rid of this stuff. I used
to be cautious as well but after using my smoker for a while
now I'm not so worried. I've made BBQ on my smoker without even
cleaning it from the previous cook, the heat just seems to kill
anything that could harm you.

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
JimLane
 
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Default

TheAlligator wrote:
> After the day you unpack it and wash with
> detergent, NEVER let soap of any kind touch your wok again - EVER.
> Not if it's a plain carbon-steel wok - you didn't get any other kind,
> I hope. While eating, let it soak full of very hot water. Use a
> plastic scraper (we use the one intended for cleaning a baking stone)
> and carefully and gently remove all rough bits to smooth it down.
> Rinse thoroughly and repeat the scraping and rinsing if you need to.
> Dry it off somewhat, place on a burner on HIGH to evaporate all the
> moisture. Let cool a bit. Take a paper towel, pour in about a tsp of
> oil, swirl it around with the towel to coat completely the interior.
> Put back on the high heat until it starts to smoke, then remove and
> cool. Take another wad of paper towel, run it all over the inside,
> make sure there is no pooling of oil in the bottom, cover and store.
> If you do this, you will enjoy this wok more 10 years down the road
> than you do now.


Too much effort.

Simply empty the wok, put it back over the flames and when good and hot,
run it under running hot water and use the bamboo brush that usually
accompanies these. Wipe dry, put a little oil on a paper towel, run it
around the inside/outside and then reheat and let cool.

Never have had a single problem with anything sticking.


jim


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



JimLane wrote:
>
> TheAlligator wrote:
> > After the day you unpack it and wash with
> > detergent, NEVER let soap of any kind touch your wok again - EVER.
> > Not if it's a plain carbon-steel wok - you didn't get any other kind,
> > I hope. While eating, let it soak full of very hot water. Use a
> > plastic scraper (we use the one intended for cleaning a baking stone)
> > and carefully and gently remove all rough bits to smooth it down.
> > Rinse thoroughly and repeat the scraping and rinsing if you need to.
> > Dry it off somewhat, place on a burner on HIGH to evaporate all the
> > moisture. Let cool a bit. Take a paper towel, pour in about a tsp of
> > oil, swirl it around with the towel to coat completely the interior.
> > Put back on the high heat until it starts to smoke, then remove and
> > cool. Take another wad of paper towel, run it all over the inside,
> > make sure there is no pooling of oil in the bottom, cover and store.
> > If you do this, you will enjoy this wok more 10 years down the road
> > than you do now.

>
> Too much effort.
>
> Simply empty the wok, put it back over the flames and when good and hot,
> run it under running hot water and use the bamboo brush that usually
> accompanies these. Wipe dry, put a little oil on a paper towel, run it
> around the inside/outside and then reheat and let cool.
>
> Never have had a single problem with anything sticking.
>
> jim


LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never used
washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy scrub
they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
rust and no fuss either.
So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in cooking
LOL!
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Charles Gifford
 
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Default


"Arri London" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never used
> washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy scrub
> they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
> rust and no fuss either.
> So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in cooking
> LOL!


Hee, hee! That matches my cooking philosophy fairly well. I put mine in the
dishwasher. I don't consider a cooking utensil worthwhile if I can't put it
in the dishwasher! ;-)

Charlie


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
TheAlligator
 
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Default

Arri London > wrote:
>LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never used
>washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy scrub
>they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
>rust and no fuss either.
>So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in cooking
>LOL!

You know, you're probably right. But I did what I was told and am
happy with the results. I think the ritual must add to the whole
enjoyment thing. Humor me.
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



TheAlligator wrote:
>
> Arri London > wrote:
> >LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never used
> >washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy scrub
> >they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
> >rust and no fuss either.
> >So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in cooking
> >LOL!


> You know, you're probably right. But I did what I was told and am
> happy with the results. I think the ritual must add to the whole
> enjoyment thing. Humor me.


LOL hey if you have the time and you enjoy the ritual go ahead.
My wok is about 20 years old and a couple of the cast iron frying pans
(washed when necessary) are close to that age.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Charles Gifford wrote:
>
> "Arri London" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> >
> > LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never used
> > washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy scrub
> > they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
> > rust and no fuss either.
> > So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in cooking
> > LOL!

>
> Hee, hee! That matches my cooking philosophy fairly well. I put mine in the
> dishwasher. I don't consider a cooking utensil worthwhile if I can't put it
> in the dishwasher! ;-)
>
> Charlie


We don't have a dishwasher other than yours truly
The other thing my (urban) Chinese friends thought was funny was my use
of bamboo steamers. They thought that was very 'rural'. But I like the
scent and the flavour the bamboo imparts.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default


TheAlligator wrote:
> Arri London > wrote:
> >LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never

used
> >washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy

scrub
> >they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
> >rust and no fuss either.
> >So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in

cooking
> >LOL!

> You know, you're probably right. But I did what I was told and am
> happy with the results. I think the ritual must add to the whole
> enjoyment thing. Humor me.


Just because these people's friends are Chinese does not make them
authorities in how to cook or use a wok. It's like going down south
and expecting everyone to know how to make perfect BBQ (not use
charcoal brickettes etc... ).

Even the lady at the asian store I went to said I sound like a better
cook of asian food than she is and shes asian.

It really depends on how particular you are about your cooking
techniques. I'm sure most of us think about it more than the average
person, Chinese or not and therefore we might go to those extra lengths
or practice more traditional methods (even though there might not be a
wrong or right way to do it).

As far as not cleaning a wok well I don't clean out my cast iron
skillet and I don't wash my BBQ smoker grills because none of them need
it. Washing can take away the coating thats a fact and therefore it
can be benificial not to use soap etc... (It's probably not the soap
but the scrubbing thats the problem).

Jesse

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
TheAlligator
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Arri London > wrote:
>We don't have a dishwasher other than yours truly
>The other thing my (urban) Chinese friends thought was funny was my use
>of bamboo steamers. They thought that was very 'rural'. But I like the
>scent and the flavour the bamboo imparts.

We seem to have always had a dishwasher - but I have to tell you, I
really don't see the point and seriously wouldn't miss it if it died.
You have to basically prewash everything that goes in there, so what's
the point?
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Charles Gifford
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"TheAlligator" > wrote in message
...
> Arri London > wrote:
> >We don't have a dishwasher other than yours truly
> >The other thing my (urban) Chinese friends thought was funny was my use
> >of bamboo steamers. They thought that was very 'rural'. But I like the
> >scent and the flavour the bamboo imparts.

> We seem to have always had a dishwasher - but I have to tell you, I
> really don't see the point and seriously wouldn't miss it if it died.
> You have to basically prewash everything that goes in there, so what's
> the point?


I don't prewash anything that goes into my dishwasher. It has a built in
garbage disposal and will even grind up small bones. Everything comes out
sparkling clean and thoroughly sterilized every time. I would NOT like being
dishwasherless.

Charlie


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



wrote:
>
> TheAlligator wrote:
> > Arri London > wrote:
> > >LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I never

> used
> > >washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy

> scrub
> > >they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy taste, no
> > >rust and no fuss either.
> > >So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in

> cooking
> > >LOL!

> > You know, you're probably right. But I did what I was told and am
> > happy with the results. I think the ritual must add to the whole
> > enjoyment thing. Humor me.

>
> Just because these people's friends are Chinese does not make them
> authorities in how to cook or use a wok.


ROTFL! But it's used in every day home Chinese cooking, so one imagines
that they are. Having seen them all cook, it was obvious they *were*
authorities.

It's like going down south
> and expecting everyone to know how to make perfect BBQ (not use
> charcoal brickettes etc... ).


They all seem to think they do :P


> Even the lady at the asian store I went to said I sound like a better
> cook of asian food than she is and shes asian.


That's quite unusual. I always ask the people at the Asian shops how to
cook various things I find on the shelves. As much as I've learnt over
the years, they still know much more.
>
> It really depends on how particular you are about your cooking
> techniques. I'm sure most of us think about it more than the average
> person, Chinese or not and therefore we might go to those extra lengths
> or practice more traditional methods (even though there might not be a
> wrong or right way to do it).


My view of cooking is to practise traditional methods as far as I can
and not fuss. So I'm happy to take the advice of the various experts
with whom I come in contact. 'Extra lengths' are generally avoided in my
kitchen; there isn't a lot of time to fuss. When I need to do full out
special occasion or banquet cooking I can, of course, but it isn't what
we eat every day.

> As far as not cleaning a wok well I don't clean out my cast iron
> skillet and I don't wash my BBQ smoker grills because none of them need
> it. Washing can take away the coating thats a fact and therefore it
> can be benificial not to use soap etc... (It's probably not the soap
> but the scrubbing thats the problem).
>
> Jesse


Washing correctly doesn't take away a *properly done* coating, that's a
fact too LOL. That was the force of my friends's argument. I do wash my
cast iron frying pans with soap when they need it and the coating
doesn't come off there either. The grates on the grill outside don't get
washed because the grot burns off when the grill is fired up anyway.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Charles Gifford" > wrote

> I don't prewash anything that goes into my dishwasher. It has a built in
> garbage disposal and will even grind up small bones. Everything comes out
> sparkling clean and thoroughly sterilized every time. I would NOT like
> being
> dishwasherless.


Oh, I don't wash the dishes first, either. If my mother or mil was here,
they
would do that. I would have to stop them. I mean, scrape the half uneaten
(whatever) into the trash, but then just put it in the machine. It's old
time
thinking to wash the stuff first, then it sure would be a waste to have a
dishwasher. Mine is becoming ancient and it still turns out clean shiny
stuff without pre-rinsing.

nancy




  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
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Default


Arri London wrote:
> wrote:
> >
> > TheAlligator wrote:
> > > Arri London > wrote:
> > > >LOL! Way back when my Chinese friends were *amused* to find I

never
> > used
> > > >washing-up liquid on my wok. When their woks needed a good soapy

> > scrub
> > > >they gave it, rinsed well, dried it and oiled it. No soapy

taste, no
> > > >rust and no fuss either.
> > > >So now I do the same. Sometimes there is too much mysticism in

> > cooking
> > > >LOL!
> > > You know, you're probably right. But I did what I was told and

am
> > > happy with the results. I think the ritual must add to the whole
> > > enjoyment thing. Humor me.

> >
> > Just because these people's friends are Chinese does not make them
> > authorities in how to cook or use a wok.

>
> ROTFL! But it's used in every day home Chinese cooking, so one

imagines
> that they are. Having seen them all cook, it was obvious they *were*
> authorities.
>


In your case you had the oppertunity to know they were good cooks. I
should have worded it differently as I didn't mean to single out your
friends. And I never said they werent authorities, just that it's not
a given. My point was that just because someone is Chinese (regardless
of the fact that they use these tools daily) doesn't make them an
expert. No different than many Americans who who "american" food (if
there is such a thing) are experts on proper use of cooking tools.
There's obviously many shades of skill level.
But in the case of your friends they could have easily been bad cooks
at making asian food and therefore their advice on woks might not be
that useful.

> It's like going down south
> > and expecting everyone to know how to make perfect BBQ (not use
> > charcoal brickettes etc... ).

>
> They all seem to think they do :P


Yes but we all know better.

>
> > Even the lady at the asian store I went to said I sound like a

better
> > cook of asian food than she is and shes asian.

>
> That's quite unusual. I always ask the people at the Asian shops how

to
> cook various things I find on the shelves. As much as I've learnt

over
> the years, they still know much more.


I'm sure some of them there can teach me some things. But then I went
to buy a wok they tried to sell me the teflon one until I told them I
wanted a real wok. Then when I picked up a bamboo brush for it the
lady laughed and joked that I wanted to "be like professional chef in
resturant" (they do stock a lot of the local restruants from what I
understand). Maybe it was because I'm American and they didn't think I
was that serious about it, who knows.

My point though is that when I first started going there I assumed they
would all be great asin cooks until I realized that was a dumb way to
think. People who care about cooking and study it are experts, not
people based on their culture/heritage alone.

> > It really depends on how particular you are about your cooking
> > techniques. I'm sure most of us think about it more than the

average
> > person, Chinese or not and therefore we might go to those extra

lengths
> > or practice more traditional methods (even though there might not

be a
> > wrong or right way to do it).

>
> My view of cooking is to practise traditional methods as far as I can
> and not fuss. So I'm happy to take the advice of the various experts
> with whom I come in contact. 'Extra lengths' are generally avoided in

my
> kitchen; there isn't a lot of time to fuss. When I need to do full

out
> special occasion or banquet cooking I can, of course, but it isn't

what
> we eat every day.


I agree, and in the case of cleaning a wok without soap it actually
seems to be a time saver, not an extra length.


> > As far as not cleaning a wok well I don't clean out my cast iron
> > skillet and I don't wash my BBQ smoker grills because none of them

need
> > it. Washing can take away the coating thats a fact and therefore

it
> > can be benificial not to use soap etc... (It's probably not the

soap
> > but the scrubbing thats the problem).
> >
> > Jesse

>
> Washing correctly doesn't take away a *properly done* coating, that's

a
> fact too LOL. That was the force of my friends's argument. I do wash

my
> cast iron frying pans with soap when they need it and the coating
> doesn't come off there either. The grates on the grill outside don't

get
> washed because the grot burns off when the grill is fired up anyway.


Washing "correctly" won't but it's easy to mess it up if you don't, I
know from experience I guess I just haven't ever had a need to use
soap. It seems if there is a "properly done" coating then that's an
unecessary step. You can use heat to burn anything off just like a
grill.

Jesse

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
> >
wrote:
>


> > ROTFL! But it's used in every day home Chinese cooking, so one

> imagines
> > that they are. Having seen them all cook, it was obvious they *were*
> > authorities.
> >

>
> In your case you had the oppertunity to know they were good cooks. I
> should have worded it differently as I didn't mean to single out your
> friends. And I never said they werent authorities, just that it's not
> a given. My point was that just because someone is Chinese (regardless
> of the fact that they use these tools daily) doesn't make them an
> expert.


It makes them more of an expert than someone who *doesn't* use those
tools daily. But perhaps I've been fortunate; haven't yet met someone
Chinese who wasn't a great cook. Maybe it's the luck of the draw.

No different than many Americans who who "american" food (if
> there is such a thing) are experts on proper use of cooking tools.


But to me that's another matter entirely. 'American' food and yes there
is such a thing hardly has the diversity or sophistication or long
tradition of Chinese food.

> There's obviously many shades of skill level.
> But in the case of your friends they could have easily been bad cooks
> at making asian food and therefore their advice on woks might not be
> that useful.
>

Not likely. Have been hanging out with Chinese cooks for as long as I
can remember and so far they have all been super cooks. It's just one of
those things.

> > It's like going down south
> > > and expecting everyone to know how to make perfect BBQ (not use
> > > charcoal brickettes etc... ).

> >
> > They all seem to think they do :P

>
> Yes but we all know better.


You seem to be confusing grilling with real barbeque. Haven't had as
much experience with southern American cooking as I've had with Chinese
food though LOL!
>
> >
> > > Even the lady at the asian store I went to said I sound like a

> better
> > > cook of asian food than she is and shes asian.

> >
> > That's quite unusual. I always ask the people at the Asian shops how

> to
> > cook various things I find on the shelves. As much as I've learnt

> over
> > the years, they still know much more.

>
> I'm sure some of them there can teach me some things. But then I went
> to buy a wok they tried to sell me the teflon one until I told them I
> wanted a real wok.


That's typical. They really don't think roundeyes know how to cook their
food and that's often based on past experience. It takes some convincing
sometimes.

Then when I picked up a bamboo brush for it the
> lady laughed and joked that I wanted to "be like professional chef in
> resturant" (they do stock a lot of the local restruants from what I
> understand). Maybe it was because I'm American and they didn't think I
> was that serious about it, who knows.


As I said it's typical.
>
> My point though is that when I first started going there I assumed they
> would all be great asin cooks until I realized that was a dumb way to
> think. People who care about cooking and study it are experts, not
> people based on their culture/heritage alone.


It's relative. Your experiences are different than mine. I do expect
Asian cooks to be great Asian cooks and I haven't been disappointed yet.
It could be a matter of where you live of course.
>
> > > It really depends on how particular you are about your cooking
> > > techniques. I'm sure most of us think about it more than the

> average
> > > person, Chinese or not and therefore we might go to those extra

> lengths
> > > or practice more traditional methods (even though there might not

> be a
> > > wrong or right way to do it).

> >
> > My view of cooking is to practise traditional methods as far as I can
> > and not fuss. So I'm happy to take the advice of the various experts
> > with whom I come in contact. 'Extra lengths' are generally avoided in

> my
> > kitchen; there isn't a lot of time to fuss. When I need to do full

> out
> > special occasion or banquet cooking I can, of course, but it isn't

> what
> > we eat every day.

>
> I agree, and in the case of cleaning a wok without soap it actually
> seems to be a time saver, not an extra length.
>

Not at all LOL. But again your experiences are clearly different than
mine. Washing with soap when it's *necessary* takes less time than
trying to do without. And anything is better than the rancid oil smell
I've experienced using other people's woks.

> > > As far as not cleaning a wok well I don't clean out my cast iron
> > > skillet and I don't wash my BBQ smoker grills because none of them

> need
> > > it. Washing can take away the coating thats a fact and therefore

> it
> > > can be benificial not to use soap etc... (It's probably not the

> soap
> > > but the scrubbing thats the problem).
> > >
> > > Jesse

> >
> > Washing correctly doesn't take away a *properly done* coating, that's

> a
> > fact too LOL. That was the force of my friends's argument. I do wash

> my
> > cast iron frying pans with soap when they need it and the coating
> > doesn't come off there either. The grates on the grill outside don't

> get
> > washed because the grot burns off when the grill is fired up anyway.

>
> Washing "correctly" won't but it's easy to mess it up if you don't, I
> know from experience


LOL! That's where having expert help comes in handy.

I guess I just haven't ever had a need to use
> soap. It seems if there is a "properly done" coating then that's an
> unecessary step.



Depends on what has been cooked of course and how it's been cooked and
what the original wok is like.

You can use heat to burn anything off just like a
> grill.
>
> Jesse


True but then the wok would probably need to be reseasoned from time to
time. That's something I don't need to do more than once a year or so of
nearly daily use.
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