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Old 12-02-2005, 12:23 AM
Kathy
 
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Default How much oil for shortening?

I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking, the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and oil
has no air. Still, it seems to me that if one knew the air-to-grease ratio
in shortening, one could figure out an oil-for-grease substitution. I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup of
shortening the recipe calls for. But that's just guessing. Does anyone know
what the exact amount should be?

(Of course, even with the exact amount, an oil-based product will be
different than a solid grease-based product. I'll accept different, so long
as it's still good and it means I can get away from using Crisco.)

Kathy



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Old 12-02-2005, 12:33 AM
Dimitri
 
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Default


"Kathy" wrote in message
...
I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking, the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and oil
has no air. Still, it seems to me that if one knew the air-to-grease ratio
in shortening, one could figure out an oil-for-grease substitution. I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup of
shortening the recipe calls for. But that's just guessing. Does anyone
know
what the exact amount should be?

(Of course, even with the exact amount, an oil-based product will be
different than a solid grease-based product. I'll accept different, so
long
as it's still good and it means I can get away from using Crisco.)

Kathy



Can't do it successfully on a substitition basis.

See below.

Dimitri


Oils do not act as a shortener because it is a liquid and won't cream with
crystalline sugar in the same way that solid fat does. Oils tend to coat
each particle of flour, which causes a lack of contact of moisture and helps
prevent gluten development. It reduces dryness and enhances flavor. I use
it sparingly in reduced-fat baking because it has the same number of
calories and fat grams as butter, even though it has less saturated fat.

Fat Substitutes (Fruit Purees)

Fruit purees, especially applesauce, are often used as fat substitutes. The
pectin from the fruit forms a film around the tiny air bubbles in the
batter, similar to what occurs when you cream solid shortenings with sugar,
but not as effectively. My favorite fruit puree for baking is unsweetened
applesauce. Not only is it readily available but it is inexpensive and
versatile because it doesn't impart any strong flavor to the final result.
Applesauce contains more pectin than other fruit purees, which helps to
retain the moistness of baked goods. Even if a recipe is flavored with
another fruit puree, I always add a little applesauce as well. You'll see
recipes here that use pumpkin, banana, and prune purees, among others.



http://www.baking911.com/pantry_subs_fats.htm



One of the few successful soy-free, corn-free solid shortening or hard
butter substitutes on the market is food-grade coconut butter (not cocoa
butter). Solid shortening and butter can be successfully substituted with
3/4 the amount of coconut butter in most recipes (by reducing the amount of
coconut butter, you are accounting for the extra water content in it).

BUTTER, UNSALTED AND SALTEDButter, Salted: If using 1/2 pound salted butter
(2 sticks), take out 1/4 teaspoon salt (optional -- I never bother). Salted
butter contains 1/8 teaspoon salt per stick (8 tablespoons).

BUTTERMargarine: Always substitute STICK butter with STICK Margarine 1 for
1, but the taste will not be the same. I prefer to use Country Morning
Stick Blend from Land O Lakes because it is half butter and half margarine.

BUTTERVegetable Oil: Stick butter or margarine can NOT be substituted
successfully with vegetable oil, or with any liquid oil or fat. (See Healthy
Baking).

BUTTER or MARGARINE Reduced-fat Spread will ruin your recipe. Spreads have
only about 25 percent fat content, while butter and margarine contain around
80% fat, a big difference that will greatly affect the recipe.

BUTTER or MARGARINESHORTENING
1/4 cup butter or margarine = 1/4 cup Crisco shortening + 1 1/2 teaspoons
water
1/3 cup butter or margarine = 1/3 cup Crisco shortening + 2 teaspoons
water
1/2 cup butter or margarine = 1/2 cup Crisco shortening + 1 Tablespoon
water
2/3 cup butter or margarine = 2/3 cup Crisco shortening + 4 teaspoons
water
3/4 cup butter or margarine = 3/4 cup Crisco shortening + 1 Tablespoon +
1 1/2 teaspoons water
1 cup butter or margarine = 1 cup Crisco shortening + 2 Tablespoons
water (from www.crisco.com).

VEGETABLE OIL Olive Oil (use extra-light): Some bakers have successfully
substituted vegetable oil with olive oil (one for one), but I do not
recommend it in basic baking; olive oil is heavier and imparts more of a
taste than vegetable oil. It works best in yeasted bread recipes.

Canola, Sunflower Oil, Vegetable and other liquid oils can be used one for
one, instead.

Peanut Oil = vegetable oil with a splash of sesame oil


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Old 12-02-2005, 01:12 AM
Vox Humana
 
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"Kathy" wrote in message
...
I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking, the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and oil
has no air. Still, it seems to me that if one knew the air-to-grease ratio
in shortening, one could figure out an oil-for-grease substitution. I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup of
shortening the recipe calls for. But that's just guessing. Does anyone

know
what the exact amount should be?

(Of course, even with the exact amount, an oil-based product will be
different than a solid grease-based product. I'll accept different, so

long
as it's still good and it means I can get away from using Crisco.)



Solid shortening has nitrogen whipped into it. That's what makes it opaque.
The nitrogen is 20% by volume as I recall. Oil has more shortening ability
than solid shortening. Therefore, I would start with a 25% reduction.


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Old 12-02-2005, 01:39 AM
zxcvbob
 
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Default

Kathy wrote:
I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking, the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and oil
has no air. Still, it seems to me that if one knew the air-to-grease ratio
in shortening, one could figure out an oil-for-grease substitution. I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup of
shortening the recipe calls for. But that's just guessing. Does anyone know
what the exact amount should be?

(Of course, even with the exact amount, an oil-based product will be
different than a solid grease-based product. I'll accept different, so long
as it's still good and it means I can get away from using Crisco.)

Kathy



Some shortening is whipped and some isn't. Take a cup of your favorite
shortening and melt it. See how much liquid you get, and that's your
exact substitution value when you use oil. Using oil will make things
greasier just because it stays liquid.

(I don't think Crisco is whipped)

Best regards,
Bob
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Old 12-02-2005, 03:19 PM
Peter Aitken
 
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Default

"Kathy" wrote in message
...
I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking, the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and oil
has no air. Still, it seems to me that if one knew the air-to-grease ratio
in shortening, one could figure out an oil-for-grease substitution. I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup of
shortening the recipe calls for. But that's just guessing. Does anyone
know
what the exact amount should be?

(Of course, even with the exact amount, an oil-based product will be
different than a solid grease-based product. I'll accept different, so
long
as it's still good and it means I can get away from using Crisco.)

Kathy



Measure a cup of shortening, melt it, and see what you have.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.




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Old 12-02-2005, 04:38 PM
Vox Humana
 
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Default


"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Kathy wrote:
I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking,

the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and

oil
has no air. Still, it seems to me that if one knew the air-to-grease

ratio
in shortening, one could figure out an oil-for-grease substitution.

I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and

coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup

of
shortening the recipe calls for. But that's just guessing. Does anyone

know
what the exact amount should be?

(Of course, even with the exact amount, an oil-based product will be
different than a solid grease-based product. I'll accept different, so

long
as it's still good and it means I can get away from using Crisco.)

Kathy



Some shortening is whipped and some isn't. Take a cup of your favorite
shortening and melt it. See how much liquid you get, and that's your
exact substitution value when you use oil. Using oil will make things
greasier just because it stays liquid.

(I don't think Crisco is whipped)


Technically, it isn't whipped. Extremely small bubbles or nitrogen gas are
dispersed into the fat.


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Old 12-02-2005, 04:52 PM
zxcvbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Vox Humana wrote:
"zxcvbob" wrote in message

Some shortening is whipped and some isn't. Take a cup of your
favorite shortening and melt it. See how much liquid you get, and
that's your exact substitution value when you use oil. Using oil
will make things greasier just because it stays liquid.

(I don't think Crisco is whipped)



Technically, it isn't whipped. Extremely small bubbles or nitrogen
gas are dispersed into the fat.



Some shortening says "whipped" on the label, and it usually has 42
ounces per can instead of 48. I don't know if Crisco is injected with
nitrogen or not. My advice to melt OP's favorite shortening and measure
the resulting liquid will work either way.

Best regards,
Bob
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Old 14-02-2005, 08:16 AM
Connie
 
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Default

On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 17:23:41 -0700, "Kathy" wrote:

I've
been experimenting in cookies, muffins, biscuits, and pie crust and coming
out somewhere between a third to a half cup of olive oil for every cup of
shortening the recipe calls for.



In my opinion, there are some things, such as those in your list
above, that just shouldn't be made with olive oil because it alters
the taste. Along with the consistency difference from subbing oil for
a solid shortening.
Hope you get your ratio worked out.
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Old 14-02-2005, 02:57 PM
Sheldon
 
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Default


Kathy wrote:
I read recently that if one substitutes oil for shortening in baking,

the
result comes out greasy because shortening is whipped full of air and

oil
has no air.


Whatever you read (you give no citation) is patently false. In baking
*all* fats are refered to as shortening (from fats having the ability
to 'shorten' gluten fibers), whether solid or liquid. Butter and lard
is shortening and regular butter and lard has no air whipped into it
(whipped butter is not generally recommended for baking). Hydrogenated
fat (ie. Crisco) has no air "whipped" into it per se but some air is
incorporated during the manufacturing process (hydrogenization makes
liquid fat a solid at room temperature). Whether to use solid or liquid
fat is determined by the particular recipe ("greasy" has not a whit to
do with anything, unless you're a southerner--see "greazy and url"* [a
genetic speech impediment due to interbreeding]* 'Scientific
American'), most yeast risen products use liquid shortening, most
cakes, cookies, and other soda risen products use solid shortening. To
learn about "Crisco" (a brand name for a hydrogenated shortening) go
he http://crisco.com/about/faqs.asp



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