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Old 17-03-2004, 10:34 PM
Dave Rasmussen
 
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Default waterless cookware


I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I keep
the liquid for soup or something. I've never used a pressure cooker. So I
was wondering the other day with my brisquet if I would have been ahead
with a pressure cooker or these newfangled waterless cookware devices?

As for oil in the pan, I usually cook with olive oil and not much. I pour
fat off other things before I eat.

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Old 17-03-2004, 11:42 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware


"Dave Rasmussen" wrote in message
...

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I

keep
the liquid for soup or something. I've never used a pressure cooker. So I
was wondering the other day with my brisquet if I would have been ahead
with a pressure cooker or these newfangled waterless cookware devices?

As for oil in the pan, I usually cook with olive oil and not much. I pour
fat off other things before I eat.


There really isn't anything special about the so-called "waterless"
cookware. You can use the same method with any reasonably heavy cookware.
A pressure cooker is another matter. I use mine pretty frequently. You can
turn a pretty tough cut of meat into a fork-tender cut in 45 minutes. These
are completely different animals. The waterless cookware is a gimmick that
is often sold by high pressure sales people for thousands of dollars and
offers nothing you can't get with good tri-ply or equivalent. A pressure
cooker is a proven way of cooking that uses water that turns into super
heated steam under pressure. You can get entry level pressure cookers for
under $50 and more advanced models for $150 and up. I would recommend
getting pressure cooker. You can use it to make stock and soup, for large
batches of brown rice, pot roasts, and if it is large enough, for canning.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-03-2004, 11:42 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware


"Dave Rasmussen" wrote in message
...

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I

keep
the liquid for soup or something. I've never used a pressure cooker. So I
was wondering the other day with my brisquet if I would have been ahead
with a pressure cooker or these newfangled waterless cookware devices?

As for oil in the pan, I usually cook with olive oil and not much. I pour
fat off other things before I eat.


There really isn't anything special about the so-called "waterless"
cookware. You can use the same method with any reasonably heavy cookware.
A pressure cooker is another matter. I use mine pretty frequently. You can
turn a pretty tough cut of meat into a fork-tender cut in 45 minutes. These
are completely different animals. The waterless cookware is a gimmick that
is often sold by high pressure sales people for thousands of dollars and
offers nothing you can't get with good tri-ply or equivalent. A pressure
cooker is a proven way of cooking that uses water that turns into super
heated steam under pressure. You can get entry level pressure cookers for
under $50 and more advanced models for $150 and up. I would recommend
getting pressure cooker. You can use it to make stock and soup, for large
batches of brown rice, pot roasts, and if it is large enough, for canning.


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Old 19-03-2004, 04:15 AM
LET
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

You can purchase a very good set of "waterless" cookware on eBay. Do a
search for "5-ply" stainless steel. I've owned a sets for about 5 years
now. Thier real claim to fame is that the multi-ply layering of stainless
steel and aluminum make them conduct heat very well throughout the entire
pan. You can cook with a much lower heat setting. Good luck with whatever
you decide.
"Dave Rasmussen" wrote in message
...

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I

keep
the liquid for soup or something. I've never used a pressure cooker. So I
was wondering the other day with my brisquet if I would have been ahead
with a pressure cooker or these newfangled waterless cookware devices?

As for oil in the pan, I usually cook with olive oil and not much. I pour
fat off other things before I eat.



  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2004, 04:15 AM
LET
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

You can purchase a very good set of "waterless" cookware on eBay. Do a
search for "5-ply" stainless steel. I've owned a sets for about 5 years
now. Thier real claim to fame is that the multi-ply layering of stainless
steel and aluminum make them conduct heat very well throughout the entire
pan. You can cook with a much lower heat setting. Good luck with whatever
you decide.
"Dave Rasmussen" wrote in message
...

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I

keep
the liquid for soup or something. I've never used a pressure cooker. So I
was wondering the other day with my brisquet if I would have been ahead
with a pressure cooker or these newfangled waterless cookware devices?

As for oil in the pan, I usually cook with olive oil and not much. I pour
fat off other things before I eat.





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Old 19-03-2004, 04:55 PM
Steve Knight
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 20:15:54 -0800, "LET" wrote:

You can purchase a very good set of "waterless" cookware on eBay. Do a
search for "5-ply" stainless steel. I've owned a sets for about 5 years
now. Thier real claim to fame is that the multi-ply layering of stainless
steel and aluminum make them conduct heat very well throughout the entire
pan. You can cook with a much lower heat setting. Good luck with whatever


5 ply is a joke. what are the ply's how thin are they? all there is to make
ply's for the most part is SS aluminum and copper.

--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
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Old 19-03-2004, 04:55 PM
Steve Knight
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 20:15:54 -0800, "LET" wrote:

You can purchase a very good set of "waterless" cookware on eBay. Do a
search for "5-ply" stainless steel. I've owned a sets for about 5 years
now. Thier real claim to fame is that the multi-ply layering of stainless
steel and aluminum make them conduct heat very well throughout the entire
pan. You can cook with a much lower heat setting. Good luck with whatever


5 ply is a joke. what are the ply's how thin are they? all there is to make
ply's for the most part is SS aluminum and copper.

--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2004, 08:33 PM
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

On 2004-03-17, Dave Rasmussen wrote:

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I keep
the liquid for soup or something....


Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing any other
cookware can't do. Save your money and buy some good cookware or maybe a
pressure cooker.

nb
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Old 19-03-2004, 08:33 PM
notbob
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

On 2004-03-17, Dave Rasmussen wrote:

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I keep
the liquid for soup or something....


Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing any other
cookware can't do. Save your money and buy some good cookware or maybe a
pressure cooker.

nb
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Old 21-03-2004, 04:01 AM
LET
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

I agree that the "state fair" prices represent a scam, but then I only paid
$135 for a complete set. We've been using them for several years. I stand
by my earlier judgement.
"notbob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s03...
On 2004-03-17, Dave Rasmussen wrote:

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I

keep
the liquid for soup or something....


Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing any other
cookware can't do. Save your money and buy some good cookware or maybe a
pressure cooker.

nb





  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-03-2004, 04:01 AM
LET
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

I agree that the "state fair" prices represent a scam, but then I only paid
$135 for a complete set. We've been using them for several years. I stand
by my earlier judgement.
"notbob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s03...
On 2004-03-17, Dave Rasmussen wrote:

I recently started reading a little about these waterless steam cookware
items. Alot of times now when I sort of steam/boil brocolli and such I

keep
the liquid for soup or something....


Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing any other
cookware can't do. Save your money and buy some good cookware or maybe a
pressure cooker.

nb



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Old 23-03-2004, 04:59 PM
Doug Freyburger
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

LET wrote:
notbob wrote:

Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing
any other cookware can't do.


Not quite. It takes very good quality cookware to pull off waterless
cooking, so it does eliminate all low quality products. It also takes
a good sealing cover, so it eliminates all products with poor covers.

That still leaves almost any top quality cookware being capable of
waterless cooking.

Waterless cooking itself is far more work without tasting far better,
so doing it is a marketing gimic. It actually displays that fact
that your cookware is perhaps in the top third of the products out
on the market but folks who've never seen it done will think it
eliminates far more than that.

I agree that the "state fair" prices represent a scam, but then I only paid
$135 for a complete set. We've been using them for several years.


Faire prices are always higher for everything, but I've never seen
them elsewhere. One brand is West Bend, so I tried www.westbend.com
and they only list gadgets like electric skillets, mass market stuff.

Where have folks purchased waterless cookware other then fairs?
Are there sources other than Ebay? I bought some at a fair in my
first marriage and the last time I saw them they still looked like
new even having spent most of a decade cycling through the
dishwasher. I miss them.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2004, 04:59 PM
Doug Freyburger
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

LET wrote:
notbob wrote:

Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing
any other cookware can't do.


Not quite. It takes very good quality cookware to pull off waterless
cooking, so it does eliminate all low quality products. It also takes
a good sealing cover, so it eliminates all products with poor covers.

That still leaves almost any top quality cookware being capable of
waterless cooking.

Waterless cooking itself is far more work without tasting far better,
so doing it is a marketing gimic. It actually displays that fact
that your cookware is perhaps in the top third of the products out
on the market but folks who've never seen it done will think it
eliminates far more than that.

I agree that the "state fair" prices represent a scam, but then I only paid
$135 for a complete set. We've been using them for several years.


Faire prices are always higher for everything, but I've never seen
them elsewhere. One brand is West Bend, so I tried www.westbend.com
and they only list gadgets like electric skillets, mass market stuff.

Where have folks purchased waterless cookware other then fairs?
Are there sources other than Ebay? I bought some at a fair in my
first marriage and the last time I saw them they still looked like
new even having spent most of a decade cycling through the
dishwasher. I miss them.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2004, 06:19 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

(Doug Freyburger) expelled a waterless fart:

notbob wrote:

Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing
any other cookware can't do.


It takes very good quality cookware to pull off waterless
cooking.


Bullshit... there is no such thing as waterless cookware, that's simply a
marketing gimmick... I can grill a steak with never giving a thought to any
steenkin' water... is that what you mean? And iffn yer tawkin' veggies, I
don't need any steenkin pot a'tall... why I can steam an entire cauliflower,
poifectly, wrapped in a sheet of heavy duty foil... in fact anyone has an old
cheapo pot with what it's lid is all warped, simply slip a sheet of foil
between the pot and the lid. Doogie Furbooger... what kinda steenkin' con
artist name is that... a synonym for dumbass kraut.


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2004, 06:19 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default waterless cookware

(Doug Freyburger) expelled a waterless fart:

notbob wrote:

Waterless cookware is a total scam. It does absolutely nothing
any other cookware can't do.


It takes very good quality cookware to pull off waterless
cooking.


Bullshit... there is no such thing as waterless cookware, that's simply a
marketing gimmick... I can grill a steak with never giving a thought to any
steenkin' water... is that what you mean? And iffn yer tawkin' veggies, I
don't need any steenkin pot a'tall... why I can steam an entire cauliflower,
poifectly, wrapped in a sheet of heavy duty foil... in fact anyone has an old
cheapo pot with what it's lid is all warped, simply slip a sheet of foil
between the pot and the lid. Doogie Furbooger... what kinda steenkin' con
artist name is that... a synonym for dumbass kraut.


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."



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