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Old 16-03-2004, 03:10 PM
Gregory Toomey
 
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Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum (otherwise known as
milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an ingredient
in any recipe/commercial product.

So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?

gtoomey

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Old 16-03-2004, 03:31 PM
PENMART01
 
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Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

Gregory Toomey writes:

Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum (otherwise known as
milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an ingredient
in any recipe/commercial product.

So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?



Encyclopædia Britannica

sorghum

cereal grain plant of the family Gramineae (Poaceae), probably originating in
Africa, and its edible starchy seeds. All types raised chiefly for grain belong
to the species Sorghum vulgare, which includes varieties of grain sorghums and
grass sorghums, grown for hay and fodder, and broomcorn, used in making brooms
and brushes. Grain sorghums include durra, milo, shallu, kafir corn, Egyptian
corn, great millet, and Indian millet. In India sorghum is known as jowar,
cholam, or jonna; in West Africa as Guinea corn; and in China as kaoliang.
Sorghum is especially valued in hot and arid regions for its resistance to
drought and heat.

The strong grass usually grows to a height of 2 to 8 feet (0.5 to 2.5 m),
sometimes reaching as high as 15 feet (4.5 m). Stalks and leaves are coated
with a white waxy bloom, and the pith, or central portion, of the stalks of
certain varieties is juicy and sweet. The leaves are about 2 inches (5 cm)
broad and 2 1/2 feet (0.75 m) long, and the panicles, or flower clusters, range
from loose to dense, bearing 800€“3,000 kernels. The seeds vary widely among
different types in colour, shape, and size, but they are smaller than those of
the wheat plant.

Sorghum is of a lower feed quality than corn (maize). It is high in
carbohydrates, with 10 percent protein and 3.4 percent fat, and contains
calcium and small amounts of iron, vitamin B1, and nicotinic acid. The grain is
usually ground into a meal that is made into porridge, flatbreads, and cakes.
The characteristic strong flavour can be reduced by processing. The grain is
also used in making edible oil, starch, dextrose (a sugar), paste, and
alcoholic beverages. The stalks are used as fodder and building materials.
Sweet sorghums, or sorgos, are grown mainly in the United States and southern
Africa for forage and for syrup manufacture. In some countries the sweet stalks
are chewed.

Sorghum, one of Africa's major cereal grains, is also cultivated in the United
States, India, Pakistan, and northern and northeastern China. Substantial
quantities are grown in Iran, the Arabian Peninsula, Argentina, Australia, and
southern Europe.

Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service.
http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=70532
[Accessed March 16, 2004].
---


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

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Old 16-03-2004, 03:31 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

Gregory Toomey writes:

Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum (otherwise known as
milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an ingredient
in any recipe/commercial product.

So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?



Encyclopædia Britannica

sorghum

cereal grain plant of the family Gramineae (Poaceae), probably originating in
Africa, and its edible starchy seeds. All types raised chiefly for grain belong
to the species Sorghum vulgare, which includes varieties of grain sorghums and
grass sorghums, grown for hay and fodder, and broomcorn, used in making brooms
and brushes. Grain sorghums include durra, milo, shallu, kafir corn, Egyptian
corn, great millet, and Indian millet. In India sorghum is known as jowar,
cholam, or jonna; in West Africa as Guinea corn; and in China as kaoliang.
Sorghum is especially valued in hot and arid regions for its resistance to
drought and heat.

The strong grass usually grows to a height of 2 to 8 feet (0.5 to 2.5 m),
sometimes reaching as high as 15 feet (4.5 m). Stalks and leaves are coated
with a white waxy bloom, and the pith, or central portion, of the stalks of
certain varieties is juicy and sweet. The leaves are about 2 inches (5 cm)
broad and 2 1/2 feet (0.75 m) long, and the panicles, or flower clusters, range
from loose to dense, bearing 800€“3,000 kernels. The seeds vary widely among
different types in colour, shape, and size, but they are smaller than those of
the wheat plant.

Sorghum is of a lower feed quality than corn (maize). It is high in
carbohydrates, with 10 percent protein and 3.4 percent fat, and contains
calcium and small amounts of iron, vitamin B1, and nicotinic acid. The grain is
usually ground into a meal that is made into porridge, flatbreads, and cakes.
The characteristic strong flavour can be reduced by processing. The grain is
also used in making edible oil, starch, dextrose (a sugar), paste, and
alcoholic beverages. The stalks are used as fodder and building materials.
Sweet sorghums, or sorgos, are grown mainly in the United States and southern
Africa for forage and for syrup manufacture. In some countries the sweet stalks
are chewed.

Sorghum, one of Africa's major cereal grains, is also cultivated in the United
States, India, Pakistan, and northern and northeastern China. Substantial
quantities are grown in Iran, the Arabian Peninsula, Argentina, Australia, and
southern Europe.

Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service.
http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=70532
[Accessed March 16, 2004].
---


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

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Old 16-03-2004, 06:17 PM
Rick & Cyndi
 
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Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

"Gregory Toomey" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
: Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum
(otherwise known as
: milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an
ingredient
: in any recipe/commercial product.
:
: So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?
:
: gtoomey
=======

I don't know. Would that be the same Sorghum as in Sorghum
Molasses? And aren't there bird seed blends that use Milo; or am
I thinking about millet? shrug Food for thought... ! LOL

--
Cyndi
Remove a "b" to reply


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Old 16-03-2004, 06:17 PM
Rick & Cyndi
 
Posts: n/a
Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

"Gregory Toomey" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
: Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum
(otherwise known as
: milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an
ingredient
: in any recipe/commercial product.
:
: So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?
:
: gtoomey
=======

I don't know. Would that be the same Sorghum as in Sorghum
Molasses? And aren't there bird seed blends that use Milo; or am
I thinking about millet? shrug Food for thought... ! LOL

--
Cyndi
Remove a "b" to reply




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Old 16-03-2004, 08:58 PM
Doug Freyburger
 
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Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

Gregory Toomey wrote:

Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum (otherwise known as
milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an ingredient
in any recipe/commercial product.

So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?


Sorghum is a very common fodder for livestock. That is its main use.

Sorghum is also used to make a syrup similar to molasses that is
popular in some areas of rural US. It is milder than molasses and
the closest equivalent to Lyles Golden Syrup I can think of.

Sorghum is the grain that looks rather like corn, but the leaves
come out staggered not in clusters, right? And no ears, the seeds
are at the top like grains other than corn.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-03-2004, 08:58 PM
Doug Freyburger
 
Posts: n/a
Default Grain Sorghum/milo - whats it used for

Gregory Toomey wrote:

Here in Australia we grown millions of tonnes of sorghum (otherwise known as
milo) as a grain crop. But I cant recall it being listed as an ingredient
in any recipe/commercial product.

So does anybody have a recipe/know what its used for?


Sorghum is a very common fodder for livestock. That is its main use.

Sorghum is also used to make a syrup similar to molasses that is
popular in some areas of rural US. It is milder than molasses and
the closest equivalent to Lyles Golden Syrup I can think of.

Sorghum is the grain that looks rather like corn, but the leaves
come out staggered not in clusters, right? And no ears, the seeds
are at the top like grains other than corn.


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