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Old 04-03-2004, 07:58 PM
Nexis
 
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Default Turkish coffee

There used to be a place in PB (Pacific Beach for the non-cali's) called
skewers. They had good food, but had moved into a cursed building...it's
gone through a half dozen businesses in as many years...but I digress. After
a lively dinner of roasted garlic and artichoke hummus, falafel, and chicken
skewers, the manager/owner offered us some Turkish coffee. It was served in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I can't
put my finger on it.

kimberly



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Old 04-03-2004, 08:36 PM
Darrell Grainger
 
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Default Turkish coffee

On Thu, 4 Mar 2004, Nexis wrote:

There used to be a place in PB (Pacific Beach for the non-cali's) called
skewers. They had good food, but had moved into a cursed building...it's
gone through a half dozen businesses in as many years...but I digress. After
a lively dinner of roasted garlic and artichoke hummus, falafel, and chicken
skewers, the manager/owner offered us some Turkish coffee. It was served in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I can't
put my finger on it.


I've heard people here talk about Turkish coffee but never tried the stuff
myself. My boss knows the stuff but he is travelling right now and won't
be back in the country until end of March.

A quick search of the web and I found the following links:

http://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/a...0/rec0002.html
http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/19991228.html
http://www.byegm.gov.tr/yayinlarimiz...998/Jan/N9.htm

The last two articles mention little things about the process of making
the coffee and how it is different from other coffees. Maybe it is how you
are making it and not what you are putting in it that is different. I
know from baking and making other types of coffee, technique is just as
important as ingredients. It can sometimes me more chemistry than
baking/cooking.

Hope that helps.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell at cs dot toronto dot edu
Don't send e-mail to
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Old 04-03-2004, 08:56 PM
smithfarms pure kona
 
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Default Turkish coffee

On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 11:58:56 -0800, "Nexis" wrote:

There used to be a place in PB (Pacific Beach for the non-cali's)

called
skewers. They had good food, but had moved into a cursed

building...it's
gone through a half dozen businesses in as many years...but I

digress. After
a lively dinner of roasted garlic and artichoke hummus, falafel, and

chicken
skewers, the manager/owner offered us some Turkish coffee. It was

served in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does

anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and

I can't
put my finger on it.

kimberly


Have you added cardamom? I hear it is part of the Turkish coffee
recipe.
aloha,
Thunder
http://www.smithfarms.com
Farmers & Sellers of 100%
Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
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Old 04-03-2004, 09:16 PM
RobertE
 
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Default Turkish coffee


"Nexis" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
some Turkish coffee. It was served in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I

can't
put my finger on it.


I was taught to make Turkish coffee several years ago by a Turkish-Ozzie in
England (go figure). His method involved boiling ground Turkish coffee (try
your local Halal shop), water, sugar, and cardomom in a saucepan to a rather
thickish syrup. This was then allowed to sit a few minutes to let the coffee
grounds settle and then poured into small cups.

RobertE


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Old 05-03-2004, 12:12 AM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkish coffee

In rec.food.cooking, Nexis wrote:
There used to be a place in PB (Pacific Beach for the non-cali's) called
skewers. They had good food, but had moved into a cursed building...it's
gone through a half dozen businesses in as many years...but I digress. After
a lively dinner of roasted garlic and artichoke hummus, falafel, and chicken
skewers, the manager/owner offered us some Turkish coffee. It was served in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I can't
put my finger on it.


You need fresh coffee and an exceptionally good grinder, capable of
grinding to a dust-like consistency. You also need an Ibrik, which is a
coffee maker which is flat and wide on the bottom and smaller on the top,

You mix the powderedd coffee with water, and then heat the Ibrik until
the coffee foams up, but does not boil. Repeat it three times. Then let
the sledge settle a bit.

Often spices are mixed in, most commonly, cardommon.

--
....I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

- The Who


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Old 05-03-2004, 06:51 AM
Leila A.
 
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Default Turkish coffee

"RobertE" wrote in message ...
"Nexis" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
some Turkish coffee. It was served in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I

can't
put my finger on it.


I was taught to make Turkish coffee several years ago by a Turkish-Ozzie in
England (go figure). His method involved boiling ground Turkish coffee (try
your local Halal shop), water, sugar, and cardomom in a saucepan to a rather
thickish syrup. This was then allowed to sit a few minutes to let the coffee
grounds settle and then poured into small cups.

RobertE



If you look up this thread in google (groups.google.com) you'll find
me posting on it a couple of years back, with lengthy (1,001 Nights
lengthy) instructions and digressions on the topic.

Los Angeles has many, many Middle Eastern markets where you could buy
"Turkish" or Arabic coffee. You will probably find the pre-packaged,
vacuum packed blocks with ease. There may very well be roasteries that
will grind it up for you as well. The cardamom is added whole into the
grinder.

San Diego has at least one terrific Middle Eastern market, in Poway (I
can't remember where Pacific Beach is, exactly)

Good luck.
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Old 05-03-2004, 02:12 PM
Bob
 
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Default Turkish coffee

EskWIRED proffered:

You need fresh coffee and an exceptionally good grinder, capable of
grinding to a dust-like consistency. You also need an Ibrik, which is a
coffee maker which is flat and wide on the bottom and smaller on the top,

You mix the powderedd coffee with water, and then heat the Ibrik until
the coffee foams up, but does not boil. Repeat it three times. Then let
the sledge settle a bit.

Often spices are mixed in, most commonly, cardommon.


This is the way I make it, and I find it to be identical to the "Turkish"
coffee I was served at restaurants in Kuwait. Strictly speaking, you can
make the coffee in a small saucepan; it's just not as easy to pour out.

For the OP, I'm aware of two San Diego restaurants which serve Turkish
coffee:

Pomegranate, at the corner of El Cajon and Louisiana (see
http://www.russiangeorgianfood.homestead.com/)

Cafe Caspian, 4646 Park Blvd, (see http://www.caspiancorner.theshoppe.com/)


Both restaurants are excellent, even if you DON'T go there for the coffee.

Bob

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Old 05-03-2004, 02:17 PM
Orion
 
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Default Turkish coffee



EskWIRED proffered:

You need fresh coffee and an exceptionally good grinder, capable of
grinding to a dust-like consistency. You also need an Ibrik, which is a
coffee maker which is flat and wide on the bottom and smaller on the

top,

You mix the powderedd coffee with water, and then heat the Ibrik until
the coffee foams up, but does not boil. Repeat it three times. Then let
the sledge settle a bit.

Often spices are mixed in, most commonly, cardommon.


Bob noted............
This is the way I make it, and I find it to be identical to the "Turkish"
coffee I was served at restaurants in Kuwait. Strictly speaking, you can
make the coffee in a small saucepan; it's just not as easy to pour out.

For the OP, I'm aware of two San Diego restaurants which serve Turkish
coffee:

Pomegranate, at the corner of El Cajon and Louisiana (see
http://www.russiangeorgianfood.homestead.com/)

Cafe Caspian, 4646 Park Blvd, (see

http://www.caspiancorner.theshoppe.com/)


Both restaurants are excellent, even if you DON'T go there for the coffee.

Bob


Thanks, Bob. I go by both of those places almost every day, but hadn't
tried them. I think I'm going to this weekend!

Suzan



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Old 07-03-2004, 09:45 PM
Nexis
 
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Default Turkish coffee


"Bob" wrote in message
...
EskWIRED proffered:

You need fresh coffee and an exceptionally good grinder, capable of
grinding to a dust-like consistency. You also need an Ibrik, which is a
coffee maker which is flat and wide on the bottom and smaller on the

top,

You mix the powderedd coffee with water, and then heat the Ibrik until
the coffee foams up, but does not boil. Repeat it three times. Then let
the sledge settle a bit.

Often spices are mixed in, most commonly, cardommon.


This is the way I make it, and I find it to be identical to the "Turkish"
coffee I was served at restaurants in Kuwait. Strictly speaking, you can
make the coffee in a small saucepan; it's just not as easy to pour out.

For the OP, I'm aware of two San Diego restaurants which serve Turkish
coffee:

Pomegranate, at the corner of El Cajon and Louisiana (see
http://www.russiangeorgianfood.homestead.com/)

Cafe Caspian, 4646 Park Blvd, (see

http://www.caspiancorner.theshoppe.com/)


Both restaurants are excellent, even if you DON'T go there for the coffee.

Bob


Thanks Bob! I haven't been to either, so I'm anxious to check them out. I am
always looking for new and exciting places to try, as long as they have some
choices suitable for me.
Thanks again, and double thanks for including the links

kimberly



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Old 07-03-2004, 10:44 PM
No One
 
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Default Turkish coffee

I made it for years then, haven't made it for years. The way I was taught
was:

Any good espresso brand of coffee, espresso grind
Sugar to taste
Small pot

Don't remember how much coffee to put in any more (maybe a tablespoon per
cup???) but the process was.

Put water, coffee and sugar in pot. Bring to a boil, when it foams up,
remove. Back on the fire again. Do this three times then pour into
demitasse cups. The coffee grinds will settle to the bottom of the cup.
Careful when drinking if you haven't had it before as you can get a mouthful
of grounds if you drink too far down. The idea of pouring it immediately
was so that each cup had some "crema" foam on top of it.

In the Serbian restaurant I used to frequent, they flavored theirs with
Cardamom. I imagine you could give a shake or two of ground Cardamom into
the pot before brewing or add the seeds from 1-2 Cardamom pods.

Mine always tasted like what I got in restaurants.

D.

"Nexis" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
There used to be a place in PB (Pacific Beach for the non-cali's) called
skewers. They had good food, but had moved into a cursed building...it's
gone through a half dozen businesses in as many years...but I digress.

After
a lively dinner of roasted garlic and artichoke hummus, falafel, and

chicken
skewers, the manager/owner offered us some Turkish coffee. It was served

in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I

can't
put my finger on it.

kimberly






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Old 08-03-2004, 04:00 AM
The Joneses
 
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Default Turkish coffee

No One wrote:

I made it for years then, haven't made it for years. The way I was taught
was:
Any good espresso brand of coffee, espresso grind
Sugar to taste
Small pot
Don't remember how much coffee to put in any more (maybe a tablespoon per
cup???) but the process was.
Put water, coffee and sugar in pot. Bring to a boil, when it foams up,
remove. Back on the fire again. Do this three times then pour into
demitasse cups. The coffee grinds will settle to the bottom of the cup.
Careful when drinking if you haven't had it before as you can get a mouthful
of grounds if you drink too far down. The idea of pouring it immediately
was so that each cup had some "crema" foam on top of it.
In the Serbian restaurant I used to frequent, they flavored theirs with
Cardamom. I imagine you could give a shake or two of ground Cardamom into
the pot before brewing or add the seeds from 1-2 Cardamom pods.
Mine always tasted like what I got in restaurants.
"Nexis" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
There used to be a place in PB (Pacific Beach for the non-cali's) called
skewers. They had good food, but had moved into a cursed building...it's
gone through a half dozen businesses in as many years...but I digress.

After
a lively dinner of roasted garlic and artichoke hummus, falafel, and

chicken
skewers, the manager/owner offered us some Turkish coffee. It was served

in
small demitasse cups, was rich, sweet, and wonderfully tasty. Does anyone
here make such a nectar and would you be willing to part with your
method/recipe? I've been experimenting, but something is missing and I

can't
put my finger on it.


I was lucky enuf to get served Turkish style coffee many years ago. What I want
to know is are you supposed to drink/chew/savor the dregs? I love coffee so I
slurped down the grounds too. I was up for days.
Edrena

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Old 08-03-2004, 06:45 AM
Bob
 
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Default Turkish coffee

Edrena wrote:

I was lucky enuf to get served Turkish style coffee many years ago. What I
want to know is are you supposed to drink/chew/savor the dregs? I love
coffee so I slurped down the grounds too. I was up for days.


You're supposed to stop where the sludge starts, but nobody will shoot you
for consuming the grounds. I *bet* you were up for days! I used to consume
chocolate-covered espresso beans, and their effect was POTENT.

Turkish coffee is similar to loose-brewed tea in that there's supposed to be
a soothsaying skill which involves dumping the grounds into a saucer and
"reading" them. If you slurp down the grounds, I guess THAT superstition
will remain unpracticed!

Bob

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Old 08-03-2004, 03:41 PM
The Joneses
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkish coffee


Bob wrote:

Edrena wrote:
I was lucky enuf to get served Turkish style coffee many years ago. What I
want to know is are you supposed to drink/chew/savor the dregs? I love
coffee so I slurped down the grounds too. I was up for days.

You're supposed to stop where the sludge starts, but nobody will shoot you
for consuming the grounds. I *bet* you were up for days! I used to consume
chocolate-covered espresso beans, and their effect was POTENT.
Turkish coffee is similar to loose-brewed tea in that there's supposed to be
a soothsaying skill which involves dumping the grounds into a saucer and
"reading" them. If you slurp down the grounds, I guess THAT superstition
will remain unpracticed!


There I was, tempted by the Dark Side. I loved those chocolate covered coffee
beans too, but don't do much sugar anymore. They're kind of hard to find IMO.
Edrena


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Old 08-03-2004, 05:24 PM
Scott
 
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Default Turkish coffee

In article ,
"No One" wrote:

I made it for years then, haven't made it for years. The way I was taught
was:

Any good espresso brand of coffee, espresso grind
Sugar to taste
Small pot

Don't remember how much coffee to put in any more (maybe a tablespoon per
cup???) but the process was.

Put water, coffee and sugar in pot. Bring to a boil, when it foams up,
remove. Back on the fire again. Do this three times then pour into
demitasse cups. The coffee grinds will settle to the bottom of the cup.
Careful when drinking if you haven't had it before as you can get a mouthful
of grounds if you drink too far down. The idea of pouring it immediately
was so that each cup had some "crema" foam on top of it.

In the Serbian restaurant I used to frequent, they flavored theirs with
Cardamom. I imagine you could give a shake or two of ground Cardamom into
the pot before brewing or add the seeds from 1-2 Cardamom pods.


Turkish coffee should use a grind finer than espresso grind; it should
almost be like talcum powder. Read here for more info:

http://homepage.mac.com/scott_r/#ibrik

--
to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
please mail OT responses only


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