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Old 27-11-2004, 09:11 AM
Andy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Friday purchase

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.

Andy

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Old 27-11-2004, 09:41 AM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.


I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio

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Old 27-11-2004, 09:41 AM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.


I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 10:36 AM
Andy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.


I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio



Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 10:36 AM
Andy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.


I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio



Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy



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Old 27-11-2004, 12:43 PM
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Andy wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.


I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio



Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy


Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.

Jill


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 12:43 PM
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Andy wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.


I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio



Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy


Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.

Jill


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 01:26 PM
Julia Altshuler
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob (this one) wrote:

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved for
disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G



In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.


I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business. In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)


I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.


--Lia

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 01:26 PM
Julia Altshuler
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob (this one) wrote:

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved for
disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G



In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.


I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business. In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)


I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.


--Lia

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 01:31 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

jmcquown wrote:

Andy wrote:

"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio


Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy


Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.


I dunno about that. The merchants I'm talking about didn't use those
uptown financial images the rest of the time. These aren't laptop/PDA
types; they're in our rural Mennonite markets. They were more likely
making reference to having to work harder on that day than any other.

I'm going to Costco today to pick up my new glasses and do a lot of
impulse purchasing. Stop at the Green Valley Book Fair (google it,
it'll blow you away) to ostensibly buy X-mas gifts but might
accidentally buy myself some books.

I've actually already bought gifts for several people. I'm stunned. So
early...

Pastorio



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 01:31 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

jmcquown wrote:

Andy wrote:

"Bob (this one)" wrote in
:

Andy wrote:

Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason.

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio


Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy


Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.


I dunno about that. The merchants I'm talking about didn't use those
uptown financial images the rest of the time. These aren't laptop/PDA
types; they're in our rural Mennonite markets. They were more likely
making reference to having to work harder on that day than any other.

I'm going to Costco today to pick up my new glasses and do a lot of
impulse purchasing. Stop at the Green Valley Book Fair (google it,
it'll blow you away) to ostensibly buy X-mas gifts but might
accidentally buy myself some books.

I've actually already bought gifts for several people. I'm stunned. So
early...

Pastorio

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 01:52 PM
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Julia Altshuler wrote:
Bob (this one) wrote:

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G



In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.

I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy
gifts.
--Lia


I don't know about your business; you are probably correct about the
leftovers! I recall one Thanksgiving DAY when it was mandatory everyone
show up for work at the restaurant. (I also recall one bartender who
protested loudly he had plans and would not be there, regardless of the
schedule. He was honestly surprised when he was fired the next day for
failing to report.)

Management expected huge crowds of people who didn't want to cook. Planned
a special menu with turkey, dressing, gravy, etc. I was the hostess that
day and I and the servers just stood around, bored to tears. You can only
clean tables so many times. The only folks who had any business were the
bartenders (ha! The guy should have come to work!) and the cocktail
waitresses. I think a couple of people came in to buy caramel pies on their
way to someones dinner. And I seem to recall being vaguely thrilled when I
seated a party of six. That must have been the longest 8 hours of my life.

On the other hand, when I worked retail for a large retailer selling
clothing I ran my a** off the day after Thanksgiving. A person would have
to be nuts to go to a Mall on that day.

BTW, Lia, I did buy a bottle of wine yesterday as a gift. You are right;
the shop was not busy. Go figure.

Jill


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Old 27-11-2004, 01:52 PM
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Julia Altshuler wrote:
Bob (this one) wrote:

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G



In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.

I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy
gifts.
--Lia


I don't know about your business; you are probably correct about the
leftovers! I recall one Thanksgiving DAY when it was mandatory everyone
show up for work at the restaurant. (I also recall one bartender who
protested loudly he had plans and would not be there, regardless of the
schedule. He was honestly surprised when he was fired the next day for
failing to report.)

Management expected huge crowds of people who didn't want to cook. Planned
a special menu with turkey, dressing, gravy, etc. I was the hostess that
day and I and the servers just stood around, bored to tears. You can only
clean tables so many times. The only folks who had any business were the
bartenders (ha! The guy should have come to work!) and the cocktail
waitresses. I think a couple of people came in to buy caramel pies on their
way to someones dinner. And I seem to recall being vaguely thrilled when I
seated a party of six. That must have been the longest 8 hours of my life.

On the other hand, when I worked retail for a large retailer selling
clothing I ran my a** off the day after Thanksgiving. A person would have
to be nuts to go to a Mall on that day.

BTW, Lia, I did buy a bottle of wine yesterday as a gift. You are right;
the shop was not busy. Go figure.

Jill


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 02:41 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Julia Altshuler wrote:

Bob (this one) wrote:

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G


In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.


I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business.


Short version: you can go bowling in most restaurants and not hit
anybody. The only ones that do any appreciable business are the ones
in the mall food courts and fast food operations near malls and other
strong shopping areas.

Pastorio

In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)


I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.


--Lia




  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-11-2004, 02:41 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Julia Altshuler wrote:

Bob (this one) wrote:

I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. G


In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.


I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business.


Short version: you can go bowling in most restaurants and not hit
anybody. The only ones that do any appreciable business are the ones
in the mall food courts and fast food operations near malls and other
strong shopping areas.

Pastorio

In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)


I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.


--Lia




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