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Old 19-06-2020, 10:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?

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Old 19-06-2020, 10:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

On 6/19/2020 5:05 PM, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


How long do you heat up the stone? I always gave it 20 to 30 minutes.
Bottom rack. Could your sauce be making your crust too wet before it
bakes?
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Old 19-06-2020, 11:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 5:05:58 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


This will be sacrilege to some, but consider baking your pizzas in pans. Sheet pans, cake pans, whatever, thin aluminum. And coating the pans generously with oil (and a little coarse corn meal for effect) so that the bottoms of the pies "fry" in the oil at normal "high" home oven temperatures. Lower rack, of course. Result is a crunchy bottom, not a real char, but still pretty stiff and tasty, and it happens before the top gets burnt.

(I incidentally have a batch of pizza dough (75% hydration) resting in the fridge for home made pizza tomorrow or the next night.)

(And here's something that might elicit your envy or sympathy: I live in a very old (for the USA) New England farmhouse. It's a "center chimney colonial" style house. Said center chimney has five fireplaces and one ... beehive oven. Which would be perfect for pizza (or any wood-fired bread) except for the fact that the last owner who "renovated" the place covered over the oven with a wood (wood! you know, like the stuff that burns!) facing. In years of looking at it, I haven't figured our how to return it to usability without destroying an entire wall in the kitchen.)

--
Silvar Beitel
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Old 19-06-2020, 11:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

Silvar Beitel wrote:
....
(And here's something that might elicit your envy or sympathy: I live in a very old (for the USA) New England farmhouse. It's a "center chimney colonial" style house. Said center chimney has five fireplaces and one ... beehive oven. Which would be perfect for pizza (or any wood-fired bread) except for the fact that the last owner who "renovated" the place covered over the oven with a wood (wood! you know, like the stuff that burns!) facing. In years of looking at it, I haven't figured our how to return it to usability without destroying an entire wall in the kitchen.)


that's sad for sure...


songbird
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Old 20-06-2020, 02:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

Silvar...what a nice post


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Old 20-06-2020, 02:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 12:17:20 PM UTC-10, Silvar Beitel wrote:
On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 5:05:58 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


This will be sacrilege to some, but consider baking your pizzas in pans. Sheet pans, cake pans, whatever, thin aluminum. And coating the pans generously with oil (and a little coarse corn meal for effect) so that the bottoms of the pies "fry" in the oil at normal "high" home oven temperatures. Lower rack, of course. Result is a crunchy bottom, not a real char, but still pretty stiff and tasty, and it happens before the top gets burnt.

(I incidentally have a batch of pizza dough (75% hydration) resting in the fridge for home made pizza tomorrow or the next night.)

(And here's something that might elicit your envy or sympathy: I live in a very old (for the USA) New England farmhouse. It's a "center chimney colonial" style house. Said center chimney has five fireplaces and one ... beehive oven. Which would be perfect for pizza (or any wood-fired bread) except for the fact that the last owner who "renovated" the place covered over the oven with a wood (wood! you know, like the stuff that burns!) facing. In years of looking at it, I haven't figured our how to return it to usability without destroying an entire wall in the kitchen.)

--
Silvar Beitel


I have made fried crust pizza. It's always an option. I'll make it about 50% of the time. I like to make it for the kids - they seem to like it better.. As it goes, it's easier to eat because it's easy to bite into. OTOH, here's a picture of a regular crust pizza.

https://www.amazon.com/photos/shared...kQE5L5Gx_r5xtt
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Old 20-06-2020, 02:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 18:16:53 -0700 (PDT), Thomas
wrote:

Silvar...what a nice post


Where?
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Old 20-06-2020, 02:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 18:38:34 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 12:17:20 PM UTC-10, Silvar Beitel wrote:
On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 5:05:58 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


This will be sacrilege to some, but consider baking your pizzas in pans. Sheet pans, cake pans, whatever, thin aluminum. And coating the pans generously with oil (and a little coarse corn meal for effect) so that the bottoms of the pies "fry" in the oil at normal "high" home oven temperatures. Lower rack, of course. Result is a crunchy bottom, not a real char, but still pretty stiff and tasty, and it happens before the top gets burnt.

(I incidentally have a batch of pizza dough (75% hydration) resting in the fridge for home made pizza tomorrow or the next night.)

(And here's something that might elicit your envy or sympathy: I live in a very old (for the USA) New England farmhouse. It's a "center chimney colonial" style house. Said center chimney has five fireplaces and one ... beehive oven. Which would be perfect for pizza (or any wood-fired bread) except for the fact that the last owner who "renovated" the place covered over the oven with a wood (wood! you know, like the stuff that burns!) facing. In years of looking at it, I haven't figured our how to return it to usability without destroying an entire wall in the kitchen.)

--
Silvar Beitel


I have made fried crust pizza. It's always an option.


That's true. Every day one has to decide: shall I make a fried crust
pizza today or not. Most of the time, the answer will be No.

I'll make it about 50% of the time. I like to make it for the kids -
they seem to like it better. As it goes, it's easier to eat because
it's easy to bite into. OTOH, here's a picture of a regular crust
pizza.

https://www.amazon.com/photos/shared...kQE5L5Gx_r5xtt


That's a very American pizza. I hereby declare you a humble Hawaiian
American.
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Old 20-06-2020, 03:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 18:38:34 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 12:17:20 PM UTC-10, Silvar Beitel wrote:
On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 5:05:58 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?

This will be sacrilege to some, but consider baking your pizzas in pans. Sheet pans, cake pans, whatever, thin aluminum. And coating the pans generously with oil (and a little coarse corn meal for effect) so that the bottoms of the pies "fry" in the oil at normal "high" home oven temperatures. Lower rack, of course. Result is a crunchy bottom, not a real char, but still pretty stiff and tasty, and it happens before the top gets burnt.

(I incidentally have a batch of pizza dough (75% hydration) resting in the fridge for home made pizza tomorrow or the next night.)

(And here's something that might elicit your envy or sympathy: I live in a very old (for the USA) New England farmhouse. It's a "center chimney colonial" style house. Said center chimney has five fireplaces and one ... beehive oven. Which would be perfect for pizza (or any wood-fired bread) except for the fact that the last owner who "renovated" the place covered over the oven with a wood (wood! you know, like the stuff that burns!) facing. In years of looking at it, I haven't figured our how to return it to usability without destroying an entire wall in the kitchen.)

--
Silvar Beitel


I have made fried crust pizza. It's always an option.


That's true. Every day one has to decide: shall I make a fried crust
pizza today or not. Most of the time, the answer will be No.

I'll make it about 50% of the time. I like to make it for the kids -
they seem to like it better. As it goes, it's easier to eat because
it's easy to bite into. OTOH, here's a picture of a regular crust
pizza.

https://www.amazon.com/photos/shared...kQE5L5Gx_r5xtt


That's a very American pizza. I hereby declare you a humble Hawaiian
American.


Americans are so low class. Why does an otherwise noble person such
as yourself have to constantly refer to these disgusting cretins?

It just makes me close to vomiting.






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Old 20-06-2020, 09:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

Silvar Beitel writes:

On Friday, June 19, 2020 at 5:05:58 PM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


This will be sacrilege to some, but consider baking your pizzas in
pans. Sheet pans, cake pans, whatever, thin aluminum. And coating
the pans generously with oil (and a little coarse corn meal for
effect) so that the bottoms of the pies "fry" in the oil at normal
"high" home oven temperatures. Lower rack, of course. Result is a
crunchy bottom, not a real char, but still pretty stiff and tasty, and
it happens before the top gets burnt.


I don't think it's sacrilege but it sounds like a great technique for
making pizza. But this doesn't answer Thomas' question. But, your
technique sounds nice. I happened to make pizza tonight. Used my bread
machine to make the dough while I napped.

I believe the browning of the crust entails sugars in the dough. A
number of years ago I read an op-ed on why New York style pizza is
considered the best. My takeaway was that they proof their dough, at
least the ones interviewed, for up to seventy-two hours. The long
process forms sugars which caramelize during baking and gives the crust
that telltale browning.

Of you can add sugar to the dough to achieve the same browning. I did
some research to find that article with no luck. But, now, there are a
number of sites out there discussing it.

https://www.bakingsteel.com/blog/72-hour-pizza-dough


(I incidentally have a batch of pizza dough (75% hydration) resting in
the fridge for home made pizza tomorrow or the next night.)


How do you control the hydration?

--
Daniel
Visit me at: gopher://gcpp.world


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Old 20-06-2020, 09:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

Ed Pawlowski writes:

On 6/19/2020 5:05 PM, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


How long do you heat up the stone? I always gave it 20 to 30
minutes. Bottom rack. Could your sauce be making your crust too wet
before it bakes?


Speaking of sauces. Does anyone have a tried and true red pizza sauce
recipe? I just wing it with canned tomato sauce, herbs, salt, pepper, sugar.

--
Daniel

Visit me at: gopher://gcpp.world
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Old 20-06-2020, 12:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

dsi1 wrote:
OTOH, here's a picture of a regular crust pizza.

https://www.amazon.com/photos/shared...kQE5L5Gx_r5xtt


Looks quite tasty to me.
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Old 20-06-2020, 01:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default My ongoing pizza trouble

On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 11:47:28 +0100, Janet wrote:

In article , says...

On 6/19/2020 5:05 PM, Thomas wrote:
Using 00 flour, making thin pies.
Cuisinart stone in oven. Whether 550 deg or 450 i cannot get crust to nicley brown before burning top.
I tried up top in oven and down low.
I tried low then opening oven door to let top heat out.
The pies are really good but could be better.
What do I need to do to get the crust better?


How long do you heat up the stone? I always gave it 20 to 30 minutes.
Bottom rack. Could your sauce be making your crust too wet before it
bakes?


Forget the stone, its just a fancy folderol.


'Zactly! Pizza stones are just an added expense for those who know
zero about cooking. As soon as a raw cold pizza is placed on a heated
stone it's temperature drops signicantly into the COLD zone and a home
oven can't reheat it for at least 10 minutes. Most pizzarias with
real pizza ovens use perforated pizza pans for baking and that's what
I've been using for some 40 years. The pizza in the perforated pan
should be set to serve in its matching deep dish pan to prevent
condensation at the bottom of the pizza. When a hot from the oven
pizza is set on a solid metal serving pan or in a cardboard pizza box
condensation occurs removing the crispness of the pizza crust.
A real modern pizza oven has electric elements embedded inside the
stone bottom or they use the original style oven with the flames from
wood/coal/gas licking the bottom of the fire bricks.



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