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Old 22-05-2020, 08:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I looked at 14 pages at Amazon. They all differ in measurements. Some rounding up, others totally wrong.
Looking for a chart that says 1 up flour equals 120 g and 1 cup water equals 237.
I can do the math but looking to not. Suggestions?

One chart says 1c flour is 4.25 oz. = 120g
1c apple's is 4oz = 223g
1 half cup =4oz = 237

What I wrote down for my use is
1oz dry = 28.35g
1c water = 237 g/ml

This is a shame.

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Old 22-05-2020, 09:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2020-05-22 1:59 p.m., Thomas wrote:
I looked at 14 pages at Amazon. They all differ in measurements. Some rounding up, others totally wrong.
Looking for a chart that says 1 up flour equals 120 g and 1 cup water equals 237.
I can do the math but looking to not. Suggestions?

One chart says 1c flour is 4.25 oz. = 120g
1c apple's is 4oz = 223g
1 half cup =4oz = 237

What I wrote down for my use is
1oz dry = 28.35g
1c water = 237 g/ml

This is a shame.

I posted this on April 2nd:
"I've just made a couple of kg of bread dough from a newly opened bag of
flour.
I used a 250ml measuring cup as a handy scoop to put the flour into a
bowl on the scale and was astounded when it weighed 175g. A lot of US
recipes use a 4oz/114g equivalence but as many devotees of weighing will
attest, it all depends on how you fill the cup.
That 175g measure equates to 168g for a 236ml US cup.
I then used a whisk to stir up the flour in the bag and spooned the
flour to fill the cup. That weighed 134g (126g US).
No wonder my elderly neighbour complained that she couldn't make decent
pastry as she used volume measure."

Amendola & Rees, "The baker's manual" devotes several pages to
conversions of volume to weight (unfortunately ounces rather than grams)
including how the cup should be filled. Different flours have different
densities so a cup of AP does not weigh the same as a cup of bread flour.

http://tiny.cc/9rhkpz
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Old 22-05-2020, 09:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Thanks G. If I follow a pizza recipe and weigh everything including the water it should all work out even if my scale is off, correct?
Are my numbers solid?
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Old 22-05-2020, 09:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2020-05-22 2:25 p.m., Thomas wrote:
Thanks G. If I follow a pizza recipe and weigh everything including the water it should all work out even if my scale is off, correct?


It depends on how much off. Even cheap digital scales are fairly
accurate. If you use one, make sure it's on a level surface. One scale I
had was inconsistent until I realized that it was sitting on the
junction where one arm of the L-shaped worktop met the other and there
was a slight warp in the substrate. I occasionally check my newer one
with Canadian dollar coins (loonies) the original ones which weigh 7 grams.

Are my numbers solid?

Yes!
For your pizza base recipe, follow it but be prepared to add a bit more
water. I have found that wetter doughs make a better crust. If you can
find it, use Italian "00" flour that's even better.

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Old 22-05-2020, 10:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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G can you give a brief on 00 vs other numbers? Is there birdshot numbers?
Right now I have bread flour, so and wheat.
My bread flour says 12.7 percent protein content but that is meaningless to me. My app has no numbers.
I thank you.


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Old 22-05-2020, 10:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Friday, May 22, 2020 at 10:25:04 AM UTC-10, Thomas wrote:
Thanks G. If I follow a pizza recipe and weigh everything including the water it should all work out even if my scale is off, correct?
Are my numbers solid?


You should add enough water to make the kind of dough you want - sticky, soft, firm, hard. I suppose you could start off by measuring but you should stop once you get some experience. Well, that's the way I feel about it anyway.
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Old 22-05-2020, 11:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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DSI, I have very little experience. I always sucked with flour. I am reading The elements of pizza by K Forkish.
I am getting there. Stone, scale, thermometer, good yeast, bought some dead w good dating, rebought healthy yeast, diff flours, rolling mat due today. I have 3 balls that look ok but I do not have a feel for how exact I need to be.
I will get there with the help of rfc.
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Old 22-05-2020, 11:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2020-05-22 3:20 p.m., Thomas wrote:
G can you give a brief on 00 vs other numbers? Is there birdshot numbers?
Right now I have bread flour, so and wheat.
My bread flour says 12.7 percent protein content but that is meaningless to me. My app has no numbers.
I thank you.

"00" is an Italian designation and you can usually find it in Italian
delis. It has a lower protein content (softer) than your bread flour so
doesn't need as much water. I prefer it for pizza bases.
Protein content is also a measure of the gluten content. Bread flours
are usually up to 15% protein (from hard wheat), All purpose 11-12%
(makes good bread too) but pastry and cake flours are around 8% protein
(from soft wheat).
If you are following Forkish, you won't need much help from the bread
makers he-)
As for "feel", that's something that you will acquire after making a few
loaves.
For that bread flour, for every 100g, I would use a minimum 70g of water
(70% hydration using bakers' percentages). Just recently with a bread
flour that was new to me, I found that I had to use 75g of water (75%
hydration).
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Old 23-05-2020, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Just baked a Kor NY from dough from Wednesday. So good. I know with help here I can do even better.
I did 550 preheat with stone for 45 min give or take. Cooking inst was for 5 min. At 5 it was a bit light but bubbly.
3 min or so later and people would buy this.
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Old 23-05-2020, 01:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I need help linking a photo
Asked in the past but illiterate. Hook me up.
Samsung phone.


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Old 23-05-2020, 01:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Friday, May 22, 2020 at 12:11:00 PM UTC-10, Thomas wrote:
DSI, I have very little experience. I always sucked with flour. I am reading The elements of pizza by K Forkish.
I am getting there. Stone, scale, thermometer, good yeast, bought some dead w good dating, rebought healthy yeast, diff flours, rolling mat due today. I have 3 balls that look ok but I do not have a feel for how exact I need to be.
I will get there with the help of rfc.


Good luck in your quest for bread. I get the feeling that I'm gonna have to bake some too. The hard part on this rock has been finding some yeast. I went to a restaurant supply store the other day and was surprised to find 1 lb bags for under 4 bucks. They had cases of the stuff on the floor. My daughter made some foccaccia today so we might be having a little competition here.
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Old 23-05-2020, 01:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2020-05-22 6:07 p.m., Thomas wrote:
I need help linking a photo
Asked in the past but illiterate. Hook me up.
Samsung phone.

I use
https://postimages.org/
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Old 23-05-2020, 03:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 22 May 2020 12:59:03 -0700 (PDT), Thomas
wrote:

I looked at 14 pages at Amazon. They all differ in measurements. Some rounding up, others totally wrong.
Looking for a chart that says 1 up flour equals 120 g and 1 cup water equals 237.
I can do the math but looking to not. Suggestions?

One chart says 1c flour is 4.25 oz. = 120g
1c apple's is 4oz = 223g
1 half cup =4oz = 237

What I wrote down for my use is
1oz dry = 28.35g
1c water = 237 g/ml

This is a shame.


If you are using a book for your recipe, the book should indicate in
the beginning what measurements were used in preparing a recipe.
Janet US
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Old 23-05-2020, 12:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Bakers conversion chart

dsi1 wrote:

The hard part on this rock has been finding some yeast.
I went to a restaurant supply store the other day and was
surprised to find 1 lb bags for under 4 bucks.


That's an amazingly good price, imo.

I have a 3-packet strip that I paid $0.79 for.
Each packet is 0.25 ounce

Bought that way, the cost per pound would be about $17
(I think I did that math correctly)
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Old 23-05-2020, 01:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Saf instant yeast from Amazon 4 one lb bags for 11.64 all four.



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