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Old 13-05-2020, 07:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)


That has a real name.

They usually have a really nice selection of fresh
veggies. The young man restocking the fresh vegetables had no idea what
leeks were. In a perfect world he'd have known. Alas, it's not a
perfect world. The guy checked with the produce manager who confirmed,
nope, no leeks.

I finished my shopping there and then went to Food Lion. They had some
nice beautiful leeks. And yes, I made the soup.


Would have been just fine substituting plain onions for the
leeks. I've used both so I do know that the taste difference is
minimal.
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Old 13-05-2020, 07:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 5/13/2020 2:24 PM, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)


That has a real name.

That *is* it's real name.

They usually have a really nice selection of fresh
veggies. The young man restocking the fresh vegetables had no idea what
leeks were. In a perfect world he'd have known. Alas, it's not a
perfect world. The guy checked with the produce manager who confirmed,
nope, no leeks.

I finished my shopping there and then went to Food Lion. They had some
nice beautiful leeks. And yes, I made the soup.


Would have been just fine substituting plain onions for the
leeks. I've used both so I do know that the taste difference is
minimal.

No, it wouldn't. Leeks have a much more subtle taste than smaller green
onions and certainly don't taste the same to me as white or yellow onions.

Jill
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Old 13-05-2020, 08:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)


That has a real name.


The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 13-05-2020, 11:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 5/13/2020 3:58 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)


That has a real name.


The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.

Cindy Hamilton

Oh, is he thinking Vichyssoise? You're right. I don't like cold soups.
I like to serve hot potato-leek soup in small hollowed out toasted
bread boules. Oh, boule means bowl in french. In this case small round
loaves. Hollow out the center, rub with garlic and brush with olive
oil. Heat in the oven until crusty. Save the hollowed out bread to
make croutons or bread crumbs.

Jill


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Old 14-05-2020, 09:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 5/13/2020 7:49 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 5/13/2020 2:24 PM, Gary wrote:


Would have been just fine substituting plain onions for the
leeks. I've used both so I do know that the taste difference is
minimal.

No, it wouldn't.* Leeks have a much more subtle taste than smaller green
onions and certainly don't taste the same to me as white or yellow onions.

Yes, I agree, Jill. The taste is distinctly different.


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Old 14-05-2020, 02:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)


That has a real name.


The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.


I used the "New York Times" cookbook recipe.
I seem to remember they said to also puree it, then chill.

Neither of those final options appealed to me so I ate
it all hot and chunky. Same ingredients and taste.

Changing the name because of that seems a bit odd to me.
If ordered in a restaurant though, it would be expected
to be pureed and chilled.
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Old 14-05-2020, 03:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Thursday, May 14, 2020 at 9:14:25 AM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.


The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.


I used the "New York Times" cookbook recipe.
I seem to remember they said to also puree it, then chill.

Neither of those final options appealed to me so I ate
it all hot and chunky. Same ingredients and taste.

Changing the name because of that seems a bit odd to me.


Why? A particular recipe has a unique name. If you don't
prepare it that way, the unique name doesn't fit.

Suppose I made bouillabaisse but I left out the seafood.
Is it still bouillabaisse?

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 14-05-2020, 03:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dover Sole!

On 2020-05-14 10:23 a.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Thursday, May 14, 2020 at 9:14:25 AM UTC-4, Gary wrote:


Changing the name because of that seems a bit odd to me.


Why? A particular recipe has a unique name. If you don't
prepare it that way, the unique name doesn't fit.

Suppose I made bouillabaisse but I left out the seafood.
Is it still bouillabaisse?



There are lots of variations of recipes that will still qualify to bear
the name. For instance, I looked up steak au poivre recipes last night.
There were all sorts of variations. Some used ground pepper while
others used whole or coarsely ground. Some used shallots in the sauce
and some had none. Some used butter in the sauce while some had cream
and some had both. I have also seen variations of beef Stroganoff.
While different, they stuck close enough to a central theme to qualify
as the same dish.

A few years back we had a similar thread about a pet peeve of mine....
the Martini. To me, a Martini is gin and vermouth. It is not a big deal
to use vodka instead of gin. My problem is when people call anything
served in a Martini class a Martini. When you start throwing in
chocolate, or cranberry juice and orange zest and crap like that, it is
not a Martini.


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Old 14-05-2020, 05:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Thu, 14 May 2020 09:13:23 -0400, Gary wrote:

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.


The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.


I think Jill has her signature butternut squash soup cold.

I used the "New York Times" cookbook recipe.
I seem to remember they said to also puree it, then chill.

Neither of those final options appealed to me so I ate
it all hot and chunky. Same ingredients and taste.

Changing the name because of that seems a bit odd to me.
If ordered in a restaurant though, it would be expected
to be pureed and chilled.


I don't like cold soups or pureed soups, however I like Manachewitz
borsht and shav cold with sour cream. Borsht is naturally a beet soup,
shav is a soup made with sour grass (sorrel)... I like either with
sour cream and sliced hard cooked eggs.
A good price for a dozen bottles:
https://www.ebay.com/p/1900934527
Actually not sour, tastes like super spinach, Popeye loves it, Olive
Oyl loves it more because it puts lead in Popeye's pencil.
https://www.fooducate.com/product/Ma...2-FEFD45A4D471
You can find both at most supermarkets in the Jewish foods section but
you don't need to be Jewish to enjoy Jewish foods... I can assure you
I'm not Chinese but I love Chinese food, even the real Chinese food,
not just Americanized Chinese as found at Take-Outs. Long ago I had a
Chinese neighbor in Brooklyn, at least once a month we'd go to the NYC
China Town for a great meal, he could read the Chinese menu... in
between we'd dine in Little Italy, we both loved scungili with
spaghetti and pepper biscuits. Could always tell you were in an
Italian neighborhood by all the scungili shells and fig trees in the
yard. In winter all the fig trees were dressed in linoleum tied with
clothes lines.
Brooklyn probably has more different ethnic neighborhoods than
anywhere else on the planet... I tried all those foods, most I liked,
not those lamb dishes. Bleat!
Growing up in Brooklyn race/nationality meant nothing, everyone was
equal.
I remember when the subway, bus, and trolly was only a nickle, so was
a pay phone:
http://www.screanews.us/NewYork/BrooklynOld.htm



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Old 14-05-2020, 06:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 5/14/2020 12:28 PM, Sheldon Martin wrote:
On Thu, 14 May 2020 09:13:23 -0400, Gary wrote:

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.

The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.


I think Jill has her signature butternut squash soup cold.


(snippage)

No, I don't. Cindy is right, I don't like cold soups. I re-created the
butternut squash soup recipe after having a cup of it with a burger at
the Club with my dad back in the 1990's. It was the "soup du jour" on
the lunch menu. I liked it. Got back home to TN, bought a butternut
squash and set about trying to re-create it.

IMHO, mine is much better. I think they cut up and boiled the squash
(or maybe bought frozen cubes of peeled squash). I split the squash,
removed the seeds and roasted it. Theirs didn't have tarragon in it,
either. To me the addition of a little tarragon adds an extra depth to
the soup.

Jill
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Old 14-05-2020, 07:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Thursday, May 14, 2020 at 9:14:25 AM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.

The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.


I used the "New York Times" cookbook recipe.
I seem to remember they said to also puree it, then chill.

Neither of those final options appealed to me so I ate
it all hot and chunky. Same ingredients and taste.

Changing the name because of that seems a bit odd to me.


Why? A particular recipe has a unique name. If you don't
prepare it that way, the unique name doesn't fit.

Suppose I made bouillabaisse but I left out the seafood.
Is it still bouillabaisse?


You snipped my last comment to make your futile point.

"If ordered in a restaurant though, it would be expected
to be pureed and chilled."
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Old 14-05-2020, 07:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:

On 5/14/2020 12:28 PM, Sheldon Martin wrote:
On Thu, 14 May 2020 09:13:23 -0400, Gary wrote:

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.

The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.


I think Jill has her signature butternut squash soup cold.


(snippage)

No, I don't. Cindy is right, I don't like cold soups. I re-created the
butternut squash soup recipe after having a cup of it with a burger at
the Club with my dad back in the 1990's. It was the "soup du jour" on
the lunch menu. I liked it. Got back home to TN, bought a butternut
squash and set about trying to re-create it.

IMHO, mine is much better. I think they cut up and boiled the squash
(or maybe bought frozen cubes of peeled squash). I split the squash,
removed the seeds and roasted it. Theirs didn't have tarragon in it,
either. To me the addition of a little tarragon adds an extra depth to
the soup.

Jill


I tried your butternut squash soup one time and it was good.
Only thing I skipped was to puree it. I still consider that
your recipe though. Same ingredients, same taste.
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Old 14-05-2020, 08:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 5/14/2020 2:46 PM, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:

On 5/14/2020 12:28 PM, Sheldon Martin wrote:
On Thu, 14 May 2020 09:13:23 -0400, Gary wrote:

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.

The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.

I think Jill has her signature butternut squash soup cold.


(snippage)

No, I don't. Cindy is right, I don't like cold soups. I re-created the
butternut squash soup recipe after having a cup of it with a burger at
the Club with my dad back in the 1990's. It was the "soup du jour" on
the lunch menu. I liked it. Got back home to TN, bought a butternut
squash and set about trying to re-create it.

IMHO, mine is much better. I think they cut up and boiled the squash
(or maybe bought frozen cubes of peeled squash). I split the squash,
removed the seeds and roasted it. Theirs didn't have tarragon in it,
either. To me the addition of a little tarragon adds an extra depth to
the soup.

Jill


I tried your butternut squash soup one time and it was good.
Only thing I skipped was to puree it. I still consider that
your recipe though. Same ingredients, same taste.

I have no idea why you don't like pureed soups. Doesn't matter to me.
I don't like chilled soups. No biggie.

Jill
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Old 14-05-2020, 08:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dover Sole!

On Thu, 14 May 2020 14:42:58 -0400, Gary wrote:

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Thursday, May 14, 2020 at 9:14:25 AM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 2:25:59 PM UTC-4, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
A few years ago I was looking for leeks at Publix. (I had potato-leek
soup in mind.)

That has a real name.

The real name you're thinking of only applies if the soup is served
cold. Jill doesn't do cold soups.

I used the "New York Times" cookbook recipe.
I seem to remember they said to also puree it, then chill.

Neither of those final options appealed to me so I ate
it all hot and chunky. Same ingredients and taste.

Changing the name because of that seems a bit odd to me.


Why? A particular recipe has a unique name. If you don't
prepare it that way, the unique name doesn't fit.

Suppose I made bouillabaisse but I left out the seafood.
Is it still bouillabaisse?


You snipped my last comment to make your futile point.

"If ordered in a restaurant though, it would be expected
to be pureed and chilled."


You need to get out more, Burger Quick is not how to have food
experiences. I make a chunky hot squash soup all the time, it tastes
great and looks fantastic... and yes I've posted pictures. Mostly I
use different kinds of summer squash along with other veggies like
parsley, garlic, taters, carrots, celery and sometimes 'shrooms, and
tomatoes. With winter squash I prefer it roasted/grilled/baked.
Winter squash really only lends itself to pureed soup and I don't care
for any pureed soup... I prefer eating soup, not drinking/slurping
it... I outgrew Gerbers squash a lifetime ago. I roast winter squash
halved with the skin on, we like to eat the skin. The seeds feed the
critters.


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