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Old 14-02-2020, 04:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."

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Old 14-02-2020, 05:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 6:05:13 AM UTC-10, Gary wrote:
Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."


It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.
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Old 14-02-2020, 06:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 6:05:13 AM UTC-10, Gary wrote:
Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."


It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.


On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.
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Old 14-02-2020, 06:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 1:17:19 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 6:05:13 AM UTC-10, Gary wrote:
Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."


It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.


On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.


How unfortunate she did not research the local customs. Imagine the
disappointment of a Texan visiting England and receiving a cup of hot tea.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 14-02-2020, 06:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 8:17:19 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 6:05:13 AM UTC-10, Gary wrote:
Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."


It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.


On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.


What a shock that must have been. OTOH, you shouldn't expect to get the same stuff when ordering in a different land. You got to just eat like the locals do and shut the hell up. I once saw a couple dressed up like cowboys order some chili in a restaurant and boy, were they upset when they got their food! People should never order chili when they're outside of their country - especially if that country is Texas. That's just common sense.


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Old 14-02-2020, 06:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:21:31 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 1:17:19 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 6:05:13 AM UTC-10, Gary wrote:
Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.


On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.


How unfortunate she did not research the local customs. Imagine the
disappointment of a Texan visiting England and receiving a cup of hot tea.


There's nothing wrong with differences in local customs, of course.
But that little scene was an indication of where all the diabetes in
the US comes from. Too much of everything that's unhealthy.
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Old 14-02-2020, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:29:46 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 8:17:19 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.


On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.


What a shock that must have been. OTOH, you shouldn't expect to get the same stuff when ordering in a different land. You got to just eat like the locals do and shut the hell up.


True. I just didn't realize "tea" means sweet, cold and a lot of it to
y'all. And I don't understand why people don't change their ways
knowing that half the country has diabetes. You're like lemmings,
cluelessly wobbling towards the abyss.
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Old 14-02-2020, 07:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 9:00:21 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:29:46 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 8:17:19 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.


What a shock that must have been. OTOH, you shouldn't expect to get the same stuff when ordering in a different land. You got to just eat like the locals do and shut the hell up.


True. I just didn't realize "tea" means sweet, cold and a lot of it to
y'all. And I don't understand why people don't change their ways
knowing that half the country has diabetes. You're like lemmings,
cluelessly wobbling towards the abyss.


Not all y'all but some of y'all. On some parts of the US, it does indeed mean iced, sweetened, tea. Over here, it means either hot or iced. You'll be asked which one you want. We also drink Asian tea which is hot and non-sweetened.
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Old 14-02-2020, 07:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 11:10:37 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 9:00:21 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:29:46 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 8:17:19 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.

What a shock that must have been. OTOH, you shouldn't expect to get the same stuff when ordering in a different land. You got to just eat like the locals do and shut the hell up.


True. I just didn't realize "tea" means sweet, cold and a lot of it to
y'all. And I don't understand why people don't change their ways
knowing that half the country has diabetes. You're like lemmings,
cluelessly wobbling towards the abyss.


Not all y'all but some of y'all. On some parts of the US, it does indeed mean iced, sweetened, tea. Over here, it means either hot or iced. You'll be asked which one you want. We also drink Asian tea which is hot and non-sweetened.


Yes, I guess Texas doesn't represent the whole country.
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Old 14-02-2020, 07:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On 2020-02-14 12:16 p.m., Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 11:10:37 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 9:00:21 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:29:46 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 8:17:19 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.

What a shock that must have been. OTOH, you shouldn't expect to get the same stuff when ordering in a different land. You got to just eat like the locals do and shut the hell up.

True. I just didn't realize "tea" means sweet, cold and a lot of it to
y'all. And I don't understand why people don't change their ways
knowing that half the country has diabetes. You're like lemmings,
cluelessly wobbling towards the abyss.


Not all y'all but some of y'all. On some parts of the US, it does indeed mean iced, sweetened, tea. Over here, it means either hot or iced. You'll be asked which one you want. We also drink Asian tea which is hot and non-sweetened.


Yes, I guess Texas doesn't represent the whole country.

It thinks it does:-)


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Old 14-02-2020, 07:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 2:21:30 PM UTC-5, graham wrote:
On 2020-02-14 12:16 p.m., Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 11:10:37 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 9:00:21 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:29:46 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 8:17:19 AM UTC-10, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.

What a shock that must have been. OTOH, you shouldn't expect to get the same stuff when ordering in a different land. You got to just eat like the locals do and shut the hell up.

True. I just didn't realize "tea" means sweet, cold and a lot of it to
y'all. And I don't understand why people don't change their ways
knowing that half the country has diabetes. You're like lemmings,
cluelessly wobbling towards the abyss.

Not all y'all but some of y'all. On some parts of the US, it does indeed mean iced, sweetened, tea. Over here, it means either hot or iced. You'll be asked which one you want. We also drink Asian tea which is hot and non-sweetened.


Yes, I guess Texas doesn't represent the whole country.

It thinks it does:-)


Texas is the rest of the country writ large.

If an outsider wants to understand how Americans see ourselves, I
recommend two works of speculative fiction:

1632 by Eric Flint
Disruption Trilogy by R.E. McDermott


Cindy Hamilton
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Old 14-02-2020, 07:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 05:53:10 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 10:21:31 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 1:17:19 PM UTC-5, Bruce wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:45:15 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 6:05:13 AM UTC-10, Gary wrote:
Read this last week and found it interesting:

"High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a nutritive sweetener similar
to table sugar (sucrose). It's used by the food industry because
of it's many qualities, including stability, broad
functionability and abundant raw material in the (USA) Midwest.
As a rise in obesity coincided with it's introduction, some
people believed it must be the cause.

But HFCS was soon shown to have no means of causing obesity that
sucrose doesn't have, and their calories are the same. If it were
removed from the market, consumers would simply find products
more expensive."

It's widespread use in the food industry is simply because it's cheap. Americans are fat simply because food is cheap. It's all so very simple.

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.


How unfortunate she did not research the local customs. Imagine the
disappointment of a Texan visiting England and receiving a cup of hot tea.


There's nothing wrong with differences in local customs, of course.
But that little scene was an indication of where all the diabetes in
the US comes from. Too much of everything that's unhealthy.


When traveling in the US you must specify if you want hot tea or iced
tea. Iced tea is a common beverage here, available at all times of
the year and all venues. However, if you are traveling in the south,
and want iced tea you must specify that you do not want your iced tea
sweet if you want plain iced tea. Sweet-tea is (by long custom) a
beverage of the American south.
Janet US
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Old 14-02-2020, 07:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On 2/14/2020 1:17 PM, Bruce wrote:

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.

A hot cup of tea would likely have been some hot water sloshed into a
thick, cold cup, with a teabag set on the saucer.

This is why my mother never ordered tea in the US - she said that bad
coffee was more tolerable than undrinkable tea-water.

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Old 14-02-2020, 08:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

Bruce wrote:
....
True. I just didn't realize "tea" means sweet, cold and a lot of it to
y'all. And I don't understand why people don't change their ways
knowing that half the country has diabetes. You're like lemmings,
cluelessly wobbling towards the abyss.


in the south, yes, up north here you get iced tea
or hot tea and if you want sugar in it you can put
it in yourself.

i don't drink tea nearly as much now as i used to
before when i was addicted to caffiene, but as the
years went by i found out how much better i slept
without having caffiene and how little was an
addictive dose (half a cup of weak coffee two to
three days in a row).


songbird
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Old 14-02-2020, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default High-Fructose Corn Syrup

On Friday, February 14, 2020 at 2:57:02 PM UTC-5, S Viemeister wrote:
On 2/14/2020 1:17 PM, Bruce wrote:

On TV, I saw an English woman order a tea in Texas somewhere. She was
expecting a cup of hot tea. She got a bucket of cold, sweet
something-or-other with a straw.

A hot cup of tea would likely have been some hot water sloshed into a
thick, cold cup, with a teabag set on the saucer.


You're not entirely wrong. A decent tea culture has sprung up, but
only in specialty venues.

Cindy Hamilton


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