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Old 10-02-2019, 03:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:56:30 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:17:44 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message
. ..

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:53:26 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.

Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


I think rhubarb's an Anglo hobby. To each culture their own. Enjoy!

--

Well given that the USians are talking about it, don't you think you might
be wrong?? Hmmm???


But they're your colony!

---
LOL certainly not all of them


No, but the dominant strain

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Old 10-02-2019, 03:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:55:50 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:46 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:

I have never tasted rhubarb.

I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


See?

==

See what??


Two English (or English background) people agreeing on the merits of
rhubarb.
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Old 10-02-2019, 03:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 13:11:45 -0000, Janet wrote:

In article ,
says...

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


You're missing an oldfashioned treat.

Janet UK


It is more happenstance than deliberate choice. I've never come across
it in any dish I've been offered or could order, so I was far less
likely to purchase any and try to reproduce a taste or flavor at home.
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Old 10-02-2019, 04:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
GM GM is offline
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Nancy2 wrote:

Thank you, Gary, for posting the link to Barb's rhubarb recipe.

N.



Nancy2, Aledo, a small town in Western IL (just east of you) has a very successful and popular "Rhubarb Fest":

http://www.aledorhubarbfest.com/

"Aledo Rhubarb Fest!

Friday, June 7th & Saturday, June 8th, 2019

This unique festival, which is celebrating our 28th year, will feature more than 3,000 homemade Rhubarb Pies for sale, Rhubarb Sampling, 12,000 free Rhubarb seeds given away, crafts, music, entertainment and more all set in our historic downtown. Were so serious about our Rhubarb that former Governor Pat Quinn officially named Aledo the Rhubarb Capital of Illinois!...

Pictured is Rhubarb Festival Founder Darlene Johnson at her €śThank You/Retirement Party€ť held in August of 2016. Johnson founded the festival in 1990 as a way to draw people to the area and to her cousins shop, the House of Burgess in Aledo. It started off as a simple idea. That first year Mrs. Johnson and her cousin, Barbara McWhorter offered samples of 13 Rhubarb dishes on the front lawn of the House of Burgess. That first Rhubarb Festival drew 67 people. Darlene felt she was on to something so she gathered volunteers and together, under Johnsons leadership, the Rhubarb Festival has blossomed into a 2 day event that draws 8,000-10,000 people to our little charming town. The Festival has become so well known, former governor Pat Quinn declared Aledo the Rhubarb Capital of Illinois and visitors have been known to say they plan their summer vacation around the little towns festival! Mrs. Johnson said theyve had visitors from about 20 states, including California, Texas, Colorado, Nebraska and Missouri. The Rhubarb Festival Committee and the City of Aledo are very grateful for the tremendous impact Darlene has had on our community. In 2016, Darlene retired as Chairperson of the committee but still plays an active role in volunteering. Aledo native and long time Rhubarb Festival volunteer, Pam Myers has stepped up to assume responsibilities as the 2017 Rhubarb Festival Chair..."

There is also a Recipe Contest, here is the flyer:

http://www.aledorhubarbfest.com/wp-c...L-132476-5.pdf

In past rural days, rhubarb was often planted adjacent to outhouses, that way the plants received a steady supply of "nutrients" ;-)

--
Best
Greg
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Old 10-02-2019, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:55:50 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
.. .

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:46 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:

I have never tasted rhubarb.

I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


See?

==

See what??


Two English (or English background) people agreeing on the merits of
rhubarb.
==

Ahh I see. So how do you account for other people agreeing too?




  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:56:30 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message
.. .

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:17:44 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message
. ..

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:53:26 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.

Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


I think rhubarb's an Anglo hobby. To each culture their own. Enjoy!

--

Well given that the USians are talking about it, don't you think you might
be wrong?? Hmmm???


But they're your colony!

---
LOL certainly not all of them


No, but the dominant strain

=

You should ask them, not me)

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Old 10-02-2019, 06:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,858
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:03:17 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:55:50 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
. ..

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:46 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:

I have never tasted rhubarb.

I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.

Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


See?

==

See what??


Two English (or English background) people agreeing on the merits of
rhubarb.
==

Ahh I see. So how do you account for other people agreeing too?


There's always a stray sheep.
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Old 10-02-2019, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Gary wrote:

Nancy2 wrote:

Thank you, Gary, for posting the link to Barb's rhubarb recipe.

N.


You're quite welcome Nancy. I was pretty sure I had seen it there
and it was. While I looked last night, I had some free time so I
looked at ALL of those signature dishes. I didn't click on every
recipe but I did look at the list of them and did check out
several.

I recommend that everyone here take a few moments to look at all
the old recipes offered from various RFC posters in the past.
Some have pics included but not all. It's interesting just to
browse through.
- http://www.recfoodcooking.org/signature.php


Smile, I forgot that page was there.
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 19:21:22 -0500, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


Well, there are a lot of things that I haven't tasted. I like sour
things. As a child, we would pull a stalk of rhubarb, sprinkle it
with salt and eat it. (we also ate green apples the same way)
Janet US
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 04:42:53 -0500, Gary wrote:

Nancy2 wrote:

I am not fond of any adulteration of rhubarb pie....but love just plain rhubarb with
a flaky, tasty bottom crust and a lattice pastry top crust.

Our Blue-Ribbon Barb posted a rhubarb cake (kind of a simple "dump"' cake years
ago, and it is spectacularly easy and very good. Do a Google group search and I
bet you can find it. (I don't have it handy, or I would post it.)


She has it on the RFC site.

Signature dish page is -
http://www.recfoodcooking.org/signature.php

Direct link to that recipe -
http://www.recfoodcooking.org/sigs/B...rd%20Cake.html


thanks Gary for posting that. I missed ever seeing that.
Janet US


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Old 10-02-2019, 07:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 19:12:17 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
wrote:

Janet, I find it unusual your rhubarb died...it has been my experience that you can do anything
to the plants and they never die. ;-))

Mine used to produce blossom stalks, but I just cut those off or pulled them out, and would
have rhubarb most of the spring and summer. Although the early stuff was the best.

Have you ever had rhubarb sauce on chocolate cake? I had a neighbor who asked for that
dessert every year on his birthday. It's pretty tasty.

N.


My neighbor encouraged a tree to grow at the fence line and the roots
eventually stole all the water and nutrients from the rhubarb. I
don't know it that was the cause or not. Yes, I know you can pull the
blossom stalks, except, that was all this newer plant produced -- one
after another, after another. It was like this rhubarb was intended
to be a flowering plant. I'm done. I want a real rhubarb before I
get too old to go to the garden and pick some.
Never heard of rhubarb sauce on chocolate cake. I think I can see it
on a really rich chocolate cake.
Janet US
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 13:09:45 -0000, Janet wrote:

In article ,
says...

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.


I just pull them off as soon as I spot them.

This morning I noticed new buds on my rhubarb, and put a big pot over
it to force some tender early stems.

My grandfather taught me to dig a really big planting pit for rhubarb
and fill it with a lot of biodegradable material that will decay slowly
over years providing a longterm food supply. I use manure, roadkill,
bones abandoned by dog, old leather (boots, belts, bags) and old wool
(blankets, sheep fleece,clothes).

Janet UK


We did all that for planting the last rhubarb. Bushels of manure,
bushels of compost and run soaker hose to the plant (we need soaker
hoses here in my climate) That stubborn plant insisted on blossom
stalks. I read all the stuff I could to be a good rhubarb parent to
no avail. Now I find out that some rhubarb varieties are more
inclined to produce blossom stalks. I just want a plant like I first
had that lasted 25-30 years that gave huge, wide, red stalks. I
wasted a lot of years on that stupid plant. Now it goes
Janet US
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

I have three quince bushes that are in front of my front steps. They bear fruit, but my
dad is,the only person I ever knew to make quince jelly. I think it is very tasty.

N.
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:03:17 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message
.. .

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:55:50 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
. ..

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:46 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:

I have never tasted rhubarb.

I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.

Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


See?

==

See what??


Two English (or English background) people agreeing on the merits of
rhubarb.
==

Ahh I see. So how do you account for other people agreeing too?


There's always a stray sheep.

--

lol

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Old 10-02-2019, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 12:00:59 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 19:21:22 -0500, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


Well, there are a lot of things that I haven't tasted. I like sour
things. As a child, we would pull a stalk of rhubarb, sprinkle it
with salt and eat it. (we also ate green apples the same way)
Janet US



I am willing to taste most everything when presented with it, but just
never had the opportunity with rhubarb.


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