General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 12:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,794
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2/10/2019 2:16 AM, Ophelia wrote:

When we were children, we used to get a stick of rhubarb and a bag of
sugar to dip into

That was my mother's favourite way to eat it - me, I prefer it cooked.

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 02:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 31
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

In article ,
says...

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.


I just pull them off as soon as I spot them.

This morning I noticed new buds on my rhubarb, and put a big pot over
it to force some tender early stems.

My grandfather taught me to dig a really big planting pit for rhubarb
and fill it with a lot of biodegradable material that will decay slowly
over years providing a longterm food supply. I use manure, roadkill,
bones abandoned by dog, old leather (boots, belts, bags) and old wool
(blankets, sheep fleece,clothes).

Janet UK

  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 02:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 31
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

In article ,
says...

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


You're missing an oldfashioned treat.

Janet UK
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 02:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 31
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

In article , says...

Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html

Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's nasty, bitter stuff. Seems popular in some areas as you say. Some
rural towns in the midwest especially.

I've ate (or tried to eat) some rhubarb pies there. All I could taste
was pure sugar. I think the stuff is so bitter and nasty tasting that a
hell of a lot of sugar is needed to try to make it palatable, but this
was a fail for me. I'd rather eat spoonfuls of pure cane sugar ... no
need for the nasty ass rhubarb.


Blame the incompetent cooks who didn't know what they were doing.

Janet UK
  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 02:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,565
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 9:53:30 PM UTC-5, Roy wrote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


Not the Doubting Thomas to whom I'm married. He won't touch it.

I have to admit, it can be kind of slimy. I'd rather have fruit, and
given modern food transportation and preservation technology, I don't
have to look forward to that first fruity taste of fresh rhubarb after
a long winter of dried stuff. I can just nip over to the bakery in
my car and buy whatever kind of pie I like, year round. And theirs is
better than mine.

Cindy Hamilton
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 02:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,102
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Thank you, Gary, for posting the link to Barb's rhubarb recipe.

N.
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 03:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 30,844
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2019-02-10 6:16 a.m., S Viemeister wrote:
On 2/10/2019 2:16 AM, Ophelia wrote:

When we were children, we used to get a stick of rhubarb and a bag of
sugar to dip into

That was my mother's favourite way to eat it - me, I prefer it cooked.


We used to eat it straight out of the garden.

  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 03:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 3,122
Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"S Viemeister" wrote in message ...

On 2/10/2019 2:16 AM, Ophelia wrote:

When we were children, we used to get a stick of rhubarb and a bag of
sugar to dip into

That was my mother's favourite way to eat it - me, I prefer it cooked.

===

I do now




  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 03:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 3,122
Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:46 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


See?

==

See what??


  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 03:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 3,122
Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:17:44 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message
.. .

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:53:26 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


I think rhubarb's an Anglo hobby. To each culture their own. Enjoy!

--

Well given that the USians are talking about it, don't you think you might
be wrong?? Hmmm???


But they're your colony!

---
LOL certainly not all of them


  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 03:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 9,715
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 13:11:45 -0000, Janet wrote:

In article ,
says...

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


You're missing an oldfashioned treat.


Anglo treat.
  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 04:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 17,343
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Janet wrote:

In article ,
says...

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.


I just pull them off as soon as I spot them.

This morning I noticed new buds on my rhubarb, and put a big pot over
it to force some tender early stems.

My grandfather taught me to dig a really big planting pit for rhubarb
and fill it with a lot of biodegradable material that will decay slowly
over years providing a longterm food supply. I use manure, roadkill,
bones abandoned by dog, old leather (boots, belts, bags) and old wool
(blankets, sheep fleece,clothes).


Peat moss is another good thing for a garden. I've always used it
to mix in and break up hard sandy soil but one year I added way
too much and it was overkill. Each year though, as it slowly
broke down, the soil got better and better.
  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 04:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 17,343
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Nancy2 wrote:

Thank you, Gary, for posting the link to Barb's rhubarb recipe.

N.


You're quite welcome Nancy. I was pretty sure I had seen it there
and it was. While I looked last night, I had some free time so I
looked at ALL of those signature dishes. I didn't click on every
recipe but I did look at the list of them and did check out
several.

I recommend that everyone here take a few moments to look at all
the old recipes offered from various RFC posters in the past.
Some have pics included but not all. It's interesting just to
browse through.
- http://www.recfoodcooking.org/signature.php


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Just ordered a new cookbook Bryan-TGWWW General Cooking 16 07-02-2014 04:43 PM
Barb's Rhubarb Custard Cake: FROZEN RHUBARB? Lynn from Fargo General Cooking 13 26-10-2009 06:37 PM
Just ordered the new PC nemo Vegan 2 22-03-2007 06:55 AM
Just ordered new mobile pit D. Shelton Barbecue 0 01-11-2003 09:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:47 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017