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notbob[_7_] 03-02-2019 09:23 PM

what's with peanuts?
 

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that? I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad. I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie". I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you? ;)

nb


Ed Pawlowski[_5_] 03-02-2019 09:33 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/3/2019 4:23 PM, notbob wrote:

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that?┬* I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad.┬* I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie".┬* I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?┬* ;)

nb

I think parents are trying to make a sterile environment and it is
hurting, not helping kids. I started eating peanuts and peanut butter
at an early age and still have it a couple of times a week. We also
played in dirt, shared a popsicle and sodas. Makes for healthy kids.

Sqwertz[_53_] 04-02-2019 12:01 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 14:23:40 -0700, notbob wrote:

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that?


No doubt some sort of kook shit I don't want nor need to watch.

-sw

songbird 04-02-2019 02:50 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
notbob wrote:
....
What about you? ;)


i eat a lot of peanut butter.

legumes and nuts from trees are a large
part of my diet that i would really miss
if i had to change.

we've had severe cold weather and now it
is warm again and yesterday i was sorely
tempted by some black walnut ice-cream -
i held out, but barely...


songbird

Julie Bove[_2_] 04-02-2019 06:58 AM

what's with peanuts?
 

"notbob" wrote in message
...

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that? I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee tad.
I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy, which
they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room which we
seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie". I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you? ;)


I was thinking about this earlier as I finished off the dregs of a giant can
of Cocktail peanuts. I used to love them and it was my job to put them out
for company. Used to be all the oil traveled to the bottom so when you
turned the can upside down, you had to blot the excess oil off.

Excess oil is no longer the case and the peanuts don't seem as tasty to me.
Now I like Redskins better. I keep searching for good peanuts otherwise but
not finding them. The worst to me are the blister fried ones. Ick.


Cindy Hamilton[_2_] 04-02-2019 11:09 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:23:46 PM UTC-5, notbob wrote:
I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that? I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad. I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie". I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you? ;)


I'm not crazy about peanuts. Once in a great while I have peanut butter
on crackers for a snack (if I'm out of hummus).

Cindy Hamilton

[email protected] 04-02-2019 02:07 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
I doubt many eat more peanut butter than I do.

jmcquown[_2_] 06-02-2019 09:45 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/3/2019 4:23 PM, notbob wrote:

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that?┬* I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad.┬* I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie".┬* I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?┬* ;)

nb

Beats me. When I was a kid nearly everyone brought a PB or PB&J
sandwich for lunch. As a military brat, we moved a lot so I went to a
lot of different schools. I never saw a classmate break out in hives
for any reason, much less due to contact with a peanut.

I love to snack on dry roasted lightly salted peanuts. I like the
Publix brand natural PB (no added sugar) on toast for breakfast once in
a while. Peanut butter cookies are tasty, too. I even like boiled
green peanuts as a snack from time to time. :)

Jill

Gary 10-02-2019 10:23 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.


I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area. :)

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.

Dave Smith[_1_] 10-02-2019 02:39 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2019-02-10 5:23 a.m., Gary wrote:
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.


I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area. :)

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame. It
is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks are
usually half in the bag when they do it.



jmcquown[_2_] 10-02-2019 04:37 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/10/2019 9:39 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 5:23 a.m., Gary wrote:
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.


I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.┬* :)

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it┬* and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame. It
is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks are
usually half in the bag when they do it.


There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey. First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be. Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out. If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire. Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.

Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey

[email protected] 10-02-2019 05:07 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 11:37:55 -0500, jmcquown
wrote:

On 2/10/2019 9:39 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 5:23 a.m., Gary wrote:
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.

I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.

Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.* :)

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it* and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame. It
is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks are
usually half in the bag when they do it.


There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey. First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be. Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out. If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire. Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.

Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey


Not interested in deep fried turkey either, however if I were, for
safety I'd quarter the turkey and then depending on the size of the
turkey I'd cook one or two parts at a time.
With a large roasting chicken I quarter it and roast it in a pan, most
times I portion it in eights... much easier method to serve a hot from
the oven roasted chicken. Sometimes the portioned chicken is placed
on a bed of veggies; spuds, celery, carrots, etc... saves having to
scrub a rack. It's been many years since I roasted a chicken whole. I
like to remove the backbone anyway, don't need spinal fluid flavoring.
I like to remove the rib bones too, easy to pull out cleanly with a
paper towel.


Gary 10-02-2019 06:16 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
jmcquown wrote:

There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey. First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be. Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out. If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire. Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.


Well, I was there that one day so I do know.
You start with a HUGE NAVY pot like Sheldon has. One that will
easily fit a large turkey with plenty of room to spare.

You put your turkey in the pot, then fill it with water up to
desired level at least 2-3" over the turkey and still leaving
several inches of air space over top of the liquid.

Then you remove the turkey, and dry it off inside and out.

Measure the water left in the pot and that's how much oil you
put in to cook the turkey.

Take that pot and the gas burner way out in the back yard well
away from the house then turn it on and bring the oil up to the
proper temperature. When ready to add the turkey, it must be
lowered VERY SLOWLY into the hot oil otherwise it will bubble
over and start a fire.

It took us about 2 minutes to slowly lower the turkey in. Once
in, it only took about 40 minutes to cook the giant turkey.

And as I said, very delicious turkey and not oily at all but I
missed the inside oven roasting smell plus that pan stuffing they
made really sucked.



Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey


Gary 10-02-2019 06:17 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
wrote:

It's been many years since I roasted a chicken whole. I
like to remove the backbone anyway, don't need spinal fluid flavoring.
I like to remove the rib bones too, easy to pull out cleanly with a
paper towel.


What a baby you are. You don't even deserve to be allowed to
cook/eat a chicken.

Ed Pawlowski[_5_] 10-02-2019 07:04 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/10/2019 11:37 AM, jmcquown wrote:


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.┬* :)

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it┬* and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame.
It is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks
are usually half in the bag when they do it.


There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey.┬* First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be.┬* Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out.┬* If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire.┬* Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.

Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey


I've done it twice. Good, but a lot of work and oil. I had the pot and
burner out on the lawn.

Ed Pawlowski[_5_] 10-02-2019 07:10 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.

Bruce[_28_] 10-02-2019 07:12 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:10:03 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Excellent is also opinion.

Dave Smith[_1_] 10-02-2019 07:48 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2019-02-10 2:10 p.m., Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree.┬* A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion.┬* Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


We cook on the gas BBQ almost exclusively from May through to September
and usually have excellent meals.


Dave Smith[_1_] 10-02-2019 09:15 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2019-02-10 3:45 p.m., Pamela wrote:
On 19:10 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.


Really?? They are fooling themselves if the think the food is better?
That's one of the dumbest things you have said here.

Bruce[_28_] 10-02-2019 09:23 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 16:15:52 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-10 3:45 p.m., Pamela wrote:
On 19:10 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.


Really?? They are fooling themselves if the think the food is better?
That's one of the dumbest things you have said here.


No, he has a point. Men like to muck around with fire, especially in
the wild and woolly environment that is the suburban backyard. But
whether they cook the food well is another matter, especially if
they're barbeklutzing in a beer fog.

Hank Rogers[_2_] 10-02-2019 09:28 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
Pamela wrote:
On 19:10 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.

Maybe the event, the commotion, the smoke, the inevitable alcohol, the
socialising, perhaps a pool, the outdoors air, etc takes their mind off
the sometimes indifferent, and perhaps not well cooked, food.

I have had some good BBQs but the taste of the same food would very often be
better, in absolute terms, cooked in a kitchen.

No one would say the actual food at a picnic is better than at a dining
table but the event and its setting probably compensates. Same for a BBQ.


Probably true. I know lots of guys that proudly make bbq that is waay
too smoked. Tastes like drippings from an old stove pipe of a wood
burning stove. With smoke, more is not always better.

Some do get it just right, and if they also got a decent piece of meat
to begin with, it can be excellent.







Ed Pawlowski 10-02-2019 09:40 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 20:45:57 GMT, Pamela
wrote:



Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.

Maybe the event, the commotion, the smoke, the inevitable alcohol, the
socialising, perhaps a pool, the outdoors air, etc takes their mind off
the sometimes indifferent, and perhaps not well cooked, food.

I have had some good BBQs but the taste of the same food would very often be
better, in absolute terms, cooked in a kitchen.


Perhaps you've only had mediocre foods. If you try a nicely cooked
Spatchcocked chicken or a rib eye on the rotisseries or brisket from
the smoker you may see some foods can be better.

Even a natural casing hot dog is better off the grill than anything
you can do in the house.

Again, many other things are just personal preference. You can make
excellent corn on the cob in the microwave, but the corn off the grill
is very different. You may prefer one over the other.

[email protected] 10-02-2019 09:41 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 06:12:05 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:10:03 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Excellent is also opinion.


More than anything how food turns out is up to the one who actually
cooks it... a steak doesn't give a rat's ass whether it's cooked
indoors or outdoors. An awful lot of so-called celebrity chefs have
proven to me many times that they can't cook a lick. With 99% of
those FoodTV chefs if not for their kitchen crew behind the scenes
they couldn't operate a roach coach. As soon as I see how they handle
cutlery I know they don't belong in a kitchen... I've seen no more
than two who can carve a roast... Yan and Pepin are the only two who
know to handle cutlery... I'd say Martin Yan is a far better cook....
I owned a 5 star eatery I'd rather employ one Martin Yan than ten
Pepins.

Bruce[_28_] 10-02-2019 09:44 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 16:41:38 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 06:12:05 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:10:03 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Excellent is also opinion.


More than anything how food turns out is up to the one who actually
cooks it... a steak doesn't give a rat's ass whether it's cooked
indoors or outdoors. An awful lot of so-called celebrity chefs have
proven to me many times that they can't cook a lick. With 99% of
those FoodTV chefs if not for their kitchen crew behind the scenes
they couldn't operate a roach coach. As soon as I see how they handle
cutlery I know they don't belong in a kitchen... I've seen no more
than two who can carve a roast... Yan and Pepin are the only two who
know to handle cutlery... I'd say Martin Yan is a far better cook....
I owned a 5 star eatery I'd rather employ one Martin Yan than ten
Pepins.


How do you compare a Chinese chef to a French chef? I think they're
both very good at their respective cuisine.

[email protected] 10-02-2019 09:53 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:48:21 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-10 2:10 p.m., Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree.* A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion.* Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


We cook on the gas BBQ almost exclusively from May through to September
and usually have excellent meals.


TIAD doesn't give a rat's ass where one cooks... and to date no one
here has seen anything you've claimed to have cooked. I'm positive
that there is no big niece, big niece is your spouce, you and big
niece live on fast food drive thru.,,, so long as you two bar hopping
o'beasties are happy.

Hank Rogers[_2_] 10-02-2019 09:56 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
Bruce wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 16:41:38 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 06:12:05 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:10:03 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.

Excellent is also opinion.


More than anything how food turns out is up to the one who actually
cooks it... a steak doesn't give a rat's ass whether it's cooked
indoors or outdoors. An awful lot of so-called celebrity chefs have
proven to me many times that they can't cook a lick. With 99% of
those FoodTV chefs if not for their kitchen crew behind the scenes
they couldn't operate a roach coach. As soon as I see how they handle
cutlery I know they don't belong in a kitchen... I've seen no more
than two who can carve a roast... Yan and Pepin are the only two who
know to handle cutlery... I'd say Martin Yan is a far better cook....
I owned a 5 star eatery I'd rather employ one Martin Yan than ten
Pepins.


How do you compare a Chinese chef to a French chef? I think they're
both very good at their respective cuisine.


Doesn't matter. The strongest man in the world is the only one that can
cook. All others are liars and faggots ... especially the french. Right
Popeye?



Hank Rogers[_2_] 10-02-2019 10:39 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
Pamela wrote:
On 21:40 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 20:45:57 GMT, Pamela
wrote:



Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling
themselves if they think they're getting better tasting food.

Maybe the event, the commotion, the smoke, the inevitable alcohol, the
socialising, perhaps a pool, the outdoors air, etc takes their mind off
the sometimes indifferent, and perhaps not well cooked, food.

I have had some good BBQs but the taste of the same food would very
often be better, in absolute terms, cooked in a kitchen.


Perhaps you've only had mediocre foods. If you try a nicely cooked
Spatchcocked chicken or a rib eye on the rotisseries or brisket from
the smoker you may see some foods can be better.

Even a natural casing hot dog is better off the grill than anything
you can do in the house.

Again, many other things are just personal preference. You can make
excellent corn on the cob in the microwave, but the corn off the grill
is very different. You may prefer one over the other.


I have had some good BBQ food but it is not as common as I would like.
Usually there is either undercooked or burnt meat arriving in an ad-hoc way.
Side dishes are chosen as an expediency rather than matched to the grill
meat. Quantities are variable and actual cooking quality is hit and miss.

It's all jolly knockabout stuff, especially if you have a liking for camping,
and it can be a great fun event -- but not for its high class cuisine.

All this would be okay except for those BBQ enthusiasts, who have bought all
the fancy equipment and comandeer the event, who genuinely and sincerely
assure you its the best food you will ever taste. Ha!


You're right about the side dishes ... often crap like canned pork and
beans, sometimes potato salad, and don't forget the disgusting gummy
white buns or rolls. :)

I guess the meat and beer is supposed to be the main attraction.
Sometimes I get lucky when someone makes some really good potato salad.

One thing you forgot; in addition to undercooked stuff, there is also
the occasional tough or stringy meat, usually but not always caused by
bargain meat.

Even so, it can still be fun if you enjoy the company. Not every meal
needs to be the King's vittles.





jmcquown[_2_] 10-02-2019 11:43 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/10/2019 1:17 PM, Gary wrote:
wrote:

It's been many years since I roasted a chicken whole. I
like to remove the backbone anyway, don't need spinal fluid flavoring.
I like to remove the rib bones too, easy to pull out cleanly with a
paper towel.


What a baby you are. You don't even deserve to be allowed to
cook/eat a chicken.

For some reason I thought he was the guy who always chided people for
*not* roasting a whole chicken. Maybe I'm confused. I know he's
chastised people for not buying and cutting up a whole chicken rather
than buying the parts they want. I know how to cut up a chicken, I just
don't care to do it when all I want is the thighs and drumsticks. :)

Jill

Hank Rogers[_2_] 11-02-2019 12:05 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
jmcquown wrote:
On 2/10/2019 1:17 PM, Gary wrote:
wrote:

It's been many years since I roasted a chicken whole. I
like to remove the backbone anyway, don't need spinal fluid flavoring.
I like to remove the rib bones too, easy to pull out cleanly with a
paper towel.


What a baby you are. You don't even deserve to be allowed to
cook/eat a chicken.

For some reason I thought he was the guy who always chided people for
*not* roasting a whole chicken.

Jill


A chicken? Hell, he wouldn't cook lass than 100 lb of chicken at a time
.... and they better be at least 5 lb per bird.





[email protected] 11-02-2019 12:21 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 20:45:57 GMT, Pamela
wrote:

On 19:10 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.

Maybe the event, the commotion, the smoke, the inevitable alcohol, the
socialising, perhaps a pool, the outdoors air, etc takes their mind off
the sometimes indifferent, and perhaps not well cooked, food.

I have had some good BBQs but the taste of the same food would very often be
better, in absolute terms, cooked in a kitchen.

No one would say the actual food at a picnic is better than at a dining
table but the event and its setting probably compensates. Same for a BBQ.


I must agree. Most who host outdoor BBQs turn out crap... no better
than an upstate NY churchy FEED. Most times the main event is cheap
bologna sandwiches on white bread with yallow mustard.

Ed Pawlowski[_5_] 11-02-2019 03:58 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/10/2019 7:21 PM, wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 20:45:57 GMT, Pamela
wrote:

On 19:10 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree. A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion. Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.

Maybe the event, the commotion, the smoke, the inevitable alcohol, the
socialising, perhaps a pool, the outdoors air, etc takes their mind off
the sometimes indifferent, and perhaps not well cooked, food.

I have had some good BBQs but the taste of the same food would very often be
better, in absolute terms, cooked in a kitchen.

No one would say the actual food at a picnic is better than at a dining
table but the event and its setting probably compensates. Same for a BBQ.


I must agree. Most who host outdoor BBQs turn out crap... no better
than an upstate NY churchy FEED. Most times the main event is cheap
bologna sandwiches on white bread with yallow mustard.

While I agree with that, we are talking apples and oranges here. Yes,
the typical backyard bbq, company picnic, church picnic is about volume
and a social event that happens to have food.

The other end is the able cook that uses an outdoor grill to turn out
some really good food. Usually is is just a family meal or a couple of
guests, not a big feed. The grill is another cooking tool with some
differences to the typical range in the kitchen.

Nancy2[_2_] 11-02-2019 01:56 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
People wanting to deep fry a whole turkey are urged to do it outside, away from any wood
decking or house overhangs. Lots of garages have been set on fire.

N.

dsi1[_2_] 11-02-2019 07:21 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 3:56:53 AM UTC-10, Nancy2 wrote:
People wanting to deep fry a whole turkey are urged to do it outside, away from any wood
decking or house overhangs. Lots of garages have been set on fire.

N.


In America, turkey cooks your goose.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIDMXI2c9yQ

[email protected] 11-02-2019 10:15 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
The secret I posted here years ago and several times but no one
believed... rotisserie chicken is Russion Roulette... most times it's
fine but one never knows... even we buy one 'bout once a year. But
most times we buy an Oven Roaster when they are 80ó-90ó Per LB, a much
better deal than those scrawny $5 twirly birds that are old as the
hills but saved with excessive salting:
https://www.tasteofhome.com/article/...serie-chicken/

jmcquown[_2_] 18-02-2019 12:58 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/10/2019 4:15 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 3:45 p.m., Pamela wrote:
On 19:10┬* 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree.┬* A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion.┬* Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.


Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling
themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.


Really?? They are fooling themselves if the think the food is better?
That's one of the dumbest things you have said here.


It really depends on the food you're cooking on the grill (BBQ). Some
things really benefit from outdoor cooking. But no, I'm not going to
cook outdoors year round.

Jill

jmcquown[_2_] 18-02-2019 01:34 AM

Grilled Corn( (WAS what's with peanuts?)
 
On 2/10/2019 4:40 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
gain, many other things are just personal preference. You can make
excellent corn on the cob in the microwave, but the corn off the grill
is very different. You may prefer one over the other.


I love, love, love grilled corn on the cob! In the husk. Peel the
husks back to remove the silk. Put the husks back in place and soak the
ears in a bucket of fresh cold salted water, so the husks won't burn.
Shake them to get rid of excess water. Grill the corn over indirect
coals, turning frequently, so the husks dry out. Don't worry if they
get a bit charred! After about 25-35 minutes the corn is perfectly
cooked. It tastes so much better than from microwaved or boiled corn on
the cob. Brush with some lightly herbed butter. Delicious!

Another thing to do with grilled corn. Ditto peeling back the husk and
removing the silk. Then soaking. But before grilling, brush the cob
with butter or olive oil. Lay some stalks of of fresh herbs along the
cob before putting the husk back in place. Fresh basil, sprigs of
marjoram or thyme, things like that. Turn the corn frequently, same as
above.

While the corn is cooking, you can also grill whatever else you'd like,
be it a couple of steaks, or some other veggies alongside. :)

Jill

[email protected] 18-02-2019 02:09 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 17 Feb 2019 19:58:19 -0500, jmcquown
wrote:

On 2/10/2019 4:15 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 3:45 p.m., Pamela wrote:
On 19:10* 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree.* A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion.* Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.

Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling
themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.


Really?? They are fooling themselves if the think the food is better?
That's one of the dumbest things you have said here.


It really depends on the food you're cooking on the grill (BBQ). Some
things really benefit from outdoor cooking. But no, I'm not going to
cook outdoors year round.

Jill


For me it really depends on cooking for how many, cooking for just the
two of us it's much easier to cook indoors, but when we have company
and weather permitting it's easier and quicker to cook most meals on
an outdoor grill. Of course it also depends on what's for dinner,
stews, soups, and pasta cook easier indoors. Steaks burgers and chops
cook easier outdoors. In summer veggies from the garden cook a lot
easier on the grill... we love grilled slabs of eggplant and zukes.
This spring I promise to set up the new Weber. However we don't have
much company anymore, most old friends are gone. This week the three
grands will be visiting, last of the skiing. They're teens now and
they love to eat.

Dave Smith[_1_] 18-02-2019 03:50 AM

Grilled Corn( (WAS what's with peanuts?)
 
On 2019-02-17 8:34 p.m., jmcquown wrote:
On 2/10/2019 4:40 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
gain, many other things are just┬* personal preference.┬* You can make
excellent corn on the cob in the microwave, but the corn off the grill
is very different.┬* You may prefer one over the other.


I love, love, love grilled corn on the cob!┬* In the husk.┬* Peel the
husks back to remove the silk.┬* Put the husks back in place and soak the
ears in a bucket of fresh cold salted water, so the husks won't burn.
Shake them to get rid of excess water.┬* Grill the corn over indirect
coals, turning frequently, so the husks dry out.┬* Don't worry if they
get a bit charred!┬* After about 25-35 minutes the corn is perfectly
cooked.┬* It tastes so much better than from microwaved or boiled corn on
the cob.┬* Brush with some lightly herbed butter.┬* Delicious!

Another thing to do with grilled corn.┬* Ditto peeling back the husk and
removing the silk.┬* Then soaking.┬* But before grilling, brush the cob
with butter or olive oil.┬* Lay some stalks of of fresh herbs along the
cob before putting the husk back in place.┬* Fresh basil, sprigs of
marjoram or thyme, things like that.┬* Turn the corn frequently, same as
above.

While the corn is cooking, you can also grill whatever else you'd like,
be it a couple of steaks, or some other veggies alongside. :)



I don't bother peeling off the silk before grilling. If it is really
freshly picked I don't ever bother soaking it. Just turn it frequently
until the husk is charred. Thanks to a suggestion here I started
eating it with lime juice and chili powder.

Jill



Ed Pawlowski[_5_] 18-02-2019 04:08 AM

what's with peanuts?
 
On 2/17/2019 7:58 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 2/10/2019 4:15 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 3:45 p.m., Pamela wrote:
On 19:10┬* 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree.┬* A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food
than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion.┬* Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.

Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling
themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.


Really?? They are fooling themselves if the think the food is better?
That's one of the dumbest things you have said here.


It really depends on the food you're cooking on the grill (BBQ).┬* Some
things really benefit from outdoor cooking.┬* But no, I'm not going to
cook outdoors year round.

Jill


Yes, indoors or outdoors does not matter. It is the cooking method that
makes a difference. Some foods benefit from the open flame. I can
make burgers in a pan, but they are better on a grill same with hot
dogs. I made some natural casing dogs the other day. Only thing that
comes close is those cookers that roll the dogs while cooking them. Fry
pans are not the same.

[email protected] 18-02-2019 04:15 PM

what's with peanuts?
 
On Sun, 17 Feb 2019 23:08:25 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/17/2019 7:58 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 2/10/2019 4:15 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 3:45 p.m., Pamela wrote:
On 19:10* 10 Feb 2019, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/10/2019 12:18 PM, Pamela wrote:


I agree.* A barbeque can be fun but it rarely produces better food
than
cooked indoors.


Better is just opinion.* Both can produce excellent food and they are
different.

Many people enjoy a BBQ but, in my experience, they are fooling
themselves
if they think they're getting better tasting food.

Really?? They are fooling themselves if the think the food is better?
That's one of the dumbest things you have said here.


It really depends on the food you're cooking on the grill (BBQ).* Some
things really benefit from outdoor cooking.* But no, I'm not going to
cook outdoors year round.

Jill


Yes, indoors or outdoors does not matter. It is the cooking method that
makes a difference. Some foods benefit from the open flame. I can
make burgers in a pan, but they are better on a grill same with hot
dogs. I made some natural casing dogs the other day. Only thing that
comes close is those cookers that roll the dogs while cooking them. Fry
pans are not the same.


I prefer steaks, chops, and burger cooked in a skillet... and I much
prefer tube steaks simmered, gets rid of much of the salts and red
dye... and can still griddle them some. But what I really like
grilled outdoors are veggies, thick slabs of eggplant, zukes, onions,
peppers, tomatoes, spuds, butternut squash, etc. When the garden is
producing is a good time to light off the grill and then may as well
cook the entre meal outdoors... however I really don't enjoy eating
outdoors, in summer it's too hot and buggy so I bring the food inside
and enjoy the A/C and bug free.


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