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Old 04-02-2019, 05:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 11:31:06 AM UTC-5, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/4/2019 7:35 AM, Gary wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
What do honey bees do in the winter (or at least on cold days),
Terry? Hibernate, I assume.

I had an odd encounter with a honey bee one nice warm day that
then turned extremely cold within an hour. It was 2-3 years ago
in January or February. I'll tell the story once you tell me how
they normally spend winter days.


ツ* When the temps drop below about 40-50ツーF they cluster up in a ball .


That reminds me. Yesterday it was a very pleasant, sunny 40 F
so we got out the lawn chairs and sat on the driveway for a
while. Most of that was waiting for the host tub to refill
after changing out most of the water.

I pictured the neighbors staring out their window: "Look at
those crazy Hamiltons! They've got the lawn chairs out in
February."

Cindy Hamilton

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Old 04-02-2019, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2019-02-04 12:38 p.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:

That reminds me. Yesterday it was a very pleasant, sunny 40 F
so we got out the lawn chairs and sat on the driveway for a
while. Most of that was waiting for the host tub to refill
after changing out most of the water.

I pictured the neighbors staring out their window: "Look at
those crazy Hamiltons! They've got the lawn chairs out in
February."



On Friday morning it was -22 C(-8F) and my well line froze and we had
about 8" of snow on the ground. This afternoon it is +16 (60F) and the
only snow on the ground is the stuff that was piled up by the plows last
week, and even those piles are small.


This after
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Old 04-02-2019, 10:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Mon, 4 Feb 2019 22:43:01 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle
wrote:

writes:
On 2019-02-04 12:38 p.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:

That reminds me. Yesterday it was a very pleasant, sunny 40 F
so we got out the lawn chairs and sat on the driveway for a
while. Most of that was waiting for the host tub to refill
after changing out most of the water.

I pictured the neighbors staring out their window: "Look at
those crazy Hamiltons! They've got the lawn chairs out in
February."



On Friday morning it was -22 C(-8F) and my well line froze and we had
about 8" of snow on the ground. This afternoon it is +16 (60F) and the
only snow on the ground is the stuff that was piled up by the plows last
week, and even those piles are small.


This after


oh come on, don't keep us in suspense - finish the story! This after
WHAT? NOW WHAT DID YOU FIND IN THE CUPBOARD?? A GNOME?????


Yes, what a cruel cliffhanger! AFTER WHAT?
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Old 11-02-2019, 12:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

Pamela wrote:
On 03:08 2 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:57:45 +1100, Bruce
wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:
On 2/1/2019 6:43 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 1/30/2019 11:04 PM, Dave Smith wrote:


This morning I was looking through the cupboards the jar honey to
fill the honey jar.ツ There were two half jars and one of them was
buckwheat honey. I had forgotten about that stuff. My wife had
picked it up for me thinking that I love the stuff.ツ She had
overestimated my attitude about the stuff. It is pretty good, but I
only like it once in a while, which is why it had been put away. It
as crystallized so I had to warm it up to liquefy it.ツ ツ Good
stuff.... once in a while.
I would be completely surprised to find anything other than South
Carolina clover honey.ツ I've got a jar of it dated 2004 and have
yet to open it.

Jill

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in
the cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .

I wonder if there's plastic in it.

No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they sell
it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's door,
they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees don't save
honey because they have much more coming... that's why I don't believe
anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big city slum
tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs sees are
drug dealing *******s.


Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals used
in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/


Those housebuilding pics look impressive. I bet they took a long time.


I bet Popeye wouldn't approve them though.




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Old 11-02-2019, 12:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/10/2019 5:29 PM, Pamela wrote:
On 03:08 2 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:57:45 +1100, Bruce
wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:
On 2/1/2019 6:43 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 1/30/2019 11:04 PM, Dave Smith wrote:

This morning I was looking through the cupboards the jar honey to
fill the honey jar.テつ* There were two half jars and one of them was
buckwheat honey. I had forgotten about that stuff. My wife had
picked it up for me thinking that I love the stuff.テつ* She had
overestimated my attitude about the stuff. It is pretty good, but I
only like it once in a while, which is why it had been put away. It
as crystallized so I had to warm it up to liquefy it.テつ*テつ* Good
stuff.... once in a while.
I would be completely surprised to find anything other than South
Carolina clover honey.テつ* I've got a jar of it dated 2004 and have
yet to open it.

Jill

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in
the cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .
I wonder if there's plastic in it.
No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they sell
it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's door,
they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees don't save
honey because they have much more coming... that's why I don't believe
anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big city slum
tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs sees are
drug dealing *******s.

Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals used
in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/

Those housebuilding pics look impressive. I bet they took a long time.

ツ*Thank you . We started in 2013 with the living room , with a temp
hallway into the camper . Until I built the kitchen and bedroom we
cooked and slept in the camper . We now have sheetrock most everywhere
except the MBR closet and parts of the kitchen area - and the vaulted
ceiling in the dining room/kitchen , which will get bead board and faux
rough cut cedar beams . I got lax about pictures during the later phases
of construction , but everything was done by me from foundation holes to
building the trusses with help as needed for stuff like setting trusses
.. I even learned to lay block , but I'd go broke doing it for a living .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 11-02-2019, 05:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 23:29:53 GMT, Pamela
wrote:

On 03:08 2 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM, wrote:

No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they sell
it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's door,
they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees don't save
honey because they have much more coming... that's why I don't believe
anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big city slum
tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs sees are
drug dealing *******s.


Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals used
in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/


Those housebuilding pics look impressive. I bet they took a long time.


Nah, you just press the button and it takes a picture.
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Old 11-02-2019, 05:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 02:40:25 GMT, Pamela
wrote:

On 00:02 11 Feb 2019, Hank Rogers wrote:

Pamela wrote:
On 03:08 2 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:57:45 +1100, Bruce
wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:
On 2/1/2019 6:43 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 1/30/2019 11:04 PM, Dave Smith wrote:


This morning I was looking through the cupboards the jar honey to
fill the honey jar.ツ There were two half jars and one of them
was buckwheat honey. I had forgotten about that stuff. My wife
had picked it up for me thinking that I love the stuff.ツ She had
overestimated my attitude about the stuff. It is pretty good, but
I only like it once in a while, which is why it had been put
away. It as crystallized so I had to warm it up to liquefy it.ツ ツ
Good stuff.... once in a while.
I would be completely surprised to find anything other than South
Carolina clover honey.ツ I've got a jar of it dated 2004 and have
yet to open it.

Jill

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in
the cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it
.

I wonder if there's plastic in it.

No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they
sell it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's
door, they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees
don't save honey because they have much more coming... that's why I
don't believe anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big
city slum tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs
sees are drug dealing *******s.

Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals
used in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/

Those housebuilding pics look impressive. I bet they took a long time.


I bet Popeye wouldn't approve them though.


Maybe it's a competitive male thing.
On the other hand, when I talk to Sheldon he's aways been polite.


I'm not at all competitive, why I've had very few male friends, most
all of my friends have always been female, and still are... I've
always found that males immediately want to start a ****ing contest...
even as little boys first thing is to show off their toybox and want
to engage in competitive sports. I don't play any sport or watch any
sport... to me grown men running around chasing a ball is the most
asinine waste of time and energy... if only they did something
constructive instead of all their war games... I've found that most
males are naturally violent.
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Old 12-02-2019, 06:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

Terry Coombs wrote:

On 2/4/2019 7:35 AM, Gary wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
What do honey bees do in the winter (or at least on cold days),
Terry? Hibernate, I assume.

I had an odd encounter with a honey bee one nice warm day that
then turned extremely cold within an hour. It was 2-3 years ago
in January or February. I'll tell the story once you tell me how
they normally spend winter days.


ツ When the temps drop below about 40-50ツーF they cluster up in a ball .
Usually in the center of the hive , but the cluster can be anywhere .
There is a constant circulation of bees from inside to outside and back
, their body heat produced warms the cluster but not the hive itself .ツ
On warm days they break cluster and go on "cleansing" flights - gotta
take an occasional dump ya know .


That's just like those idiot penguins that live in Antarctica do.
They do the same thing while stupidly standing out in open land
with full winds hitting them......for months on end.

Same dumb thing that seagulls here do. On an extremely cold and
windy day, they will all stand in a parking lot right at the
oceanfront facing the wind so it doesn't ruffle their feathers.
Dumbasses have a large building right near them....they could
walk over next to that and get out of the wind and be so much
warmer.

But...they all survive so who am I to complain?

Question for you again: When temps fall way below their cluster
thing...like 10F. Do they hibernate or just go into suspended
animation? They must do that or most would all die in winters in
the north. I do know that bumble bees shut down when frozen then
revive when warmed up.
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Old 13-02-2019, 03:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 955
Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/10/2019 8:38 PM, Pamela wrote:
On 00:02 11 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:

On 2/10/2019 5:29 PM, Pamela wrote:
On 03:08 2 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:57:45 +1100, Bruce
wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:
On 2/1/2019 6:43 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 1/30/2019 11:04 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
This morning I was looking through the cupboards the jar honey to
fill the honey jar.テム堙つ* There were two half jars and one of them
was buckwheat honey. I had forgotten about that stuff. My wife
had picked it up for me thinking that I love the stuff.テム堙つ* She
had overestimated my attitude about the stuff. It is pretty good,
but I only like it once in a while, which is why it had been put
away. It as crystallized so I had to warm it up to liquefy
it.テム堙つ*テム堙つ* Good stuff.... once in a while.
I would be completely surprised to find anything other than South
Carolina clover honey.テム堙つ* I've got a jar of it dated 2004 and
have yet to open it.

Jill

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in
the cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it
.
I wonder if there's plastic in it.
No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they
sell it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's
door, they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees
don't save honey because they have much more coming... that's why I
don't believe anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big
city slum tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs
sees are drug dealing *******s.
Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals
used in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/
Those housebuilding pics look impressive. I bet they took a long time.

テつ*Thank you . We started in 2013 with the living room , with a temp
hallway into the camper . Until I built the kitchen and bedroom we
cooked and slept in the camper . We now have sheetrock most everywhere
except the MBR closet and parts of the kitchen area - and the vaulted
ceiling in the dining room/kitchen , which will get bead board and faux
rough cut cedar beams . I got lax about pictures during the later phases
of construction , but everything was done by me from foundation holes to
building the trusses with help as needed for stuff like setting trusses
. I even learned to lay block , but I'd go broke doing it for a living .

The photos show a standalone kitchen and a standalone living room which I
was wondering about. Presumably they are all now part of one building.

That stuff is hard work. I'm fixing a single small leak in a joint of my
washing machine waste pipe and that's keeping me busy enough. A house has
a colossal amount to adjust and get right. Phew!


ツ* Actually it was designed so that as we got money available I could
add on to the living room . Both east and west walls that were exterior
are now interior walls - the west end truss in the living room is a full
self supporting , most of the wall between the kitchen/dining area and
the living room went away when we added the kitchen so it's basically
one big room . The cellar is not as big as the kitchen above it ...

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !



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Old 13-02-2019, 03:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 955
Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/12/2019 12:45 PM, Gary wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/4/2019 7:35 AM, Gary wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
What do honey bees do in the winter (or at least on cold days),
Terry? Hibernate, I assume.

I had an odd encounter with a honey bee one nice warm day that
then turned extremely cold within an hour. It was 2-3 years ago
in January or February. I'll tell the story once you tell me how
they normally spend winter days.

テ When the temps drop below about 40-50テつーF they cluster up in a ball .
Usually in the center of the hive , but the cluster can be anywhere .
There is a constant circulation of bees from inside to outside and back
, their body heat produced warms the cluster but not the hive itself .テ
On warm days they break cluster and go on "cleansing" flights - gotta
take an occasional dump ya know .

That's just like those idiot penguins that live in Antarctica do.
They do the same thing while stupidly standing out in open land
with full winds hitting them......for months on end.

Same dumb thing that seagulls here do. On an extremely cold and
windy day, they will all stand in a parking lot right at the
oceanfront facing the wind so it doesn't ruffle their feathers.
Dumbasses have a large building right near them....they could
walk over next to that and get out of the wind and be so much
warmer.

But...they all survive so who am I to complain?

Question for you again: When temps fall way below their cluster
thing...like 10F. Do they hibernate or just go into suspended
animation? They must do that or most would all die in winters in
the north. I do know that bumble bees shut down when frozen then
revive when warmed up.


Up north they sometimes insulate the hives some , especially in places
where the temps go well below zero F . We've had occasional temps here
down in single digits , the clustered bees did just fine . The big thing
is that they need food - honey or sugar - and it has to be accessible
while in cluster . As long as they have something to eat they'll pull
thru - usually , unless there are other problems like a lot of mites or
other pests . Mice can wipe out a hive in very short order . The real
worrisome time is early spring when they're "brooding up" in preparation
for the spring nectar flow . Takes a lot more food to make babies than
it does to keep the cluster warm .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 15-02-2019, 01:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/10/2019 7:02 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/10/2019 5:29 PM, Pamela wrote:
On 03:08ツ* 2 Feb 2019, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM, wrote:

And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/

Those housebuilding pics look impressive.ツ* I bet they took a long time.

ツ*Thank you . We started in 2013 with the living room , with a temp
hallway into the camper . Until I built the kitchen and bedroom we
cooked and slept in the camper . We now have sheetrock most everywhere
except the MBR closet and parts of the kitchen area - and the vaulted
ceiling in the dining room/kitchen , which will get bead board and faux
rough cut cedar beams . I got lax about pictures during the later phases
of construction , but everything was done by me from foundation holes to
building the trusses with help as needed for stuff like setting trusses
. I even learned to lay block , but I'd go broke doing it for a living .

That's one thing Sheldon can't claim he's ever done: built his own house
from the ground up. Good job!

Jill
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Old 15-02-2019, 01:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

Terry Coombs wrote:

Up north they sometimes insulate the hives some , especially in places
where the temps go well below zero F . We've had occasional temps here
down in single digits , the clustered bees did just fine . The big thing
is that they need food - honey or sugar - and it has to be accessible
while in cluster . As long as they have something to eat they'll pull
thru - usually , unless there are other problems like a lot of mites or
other pests . Mice can wipe out a hive in very short order . The real
worrisome time is early spring when they're "brooding up" in preparation
for the spring nectar flow . Takes a lot more food to make babies than
it does to keep the cluster warm .


Ok then. I will assume that when you harvest honey, you leave
enough for them to eat during the winter and spring until flowers
bloom again? IOW...if you take out ALL their honey, they would
die during the winter?

I actually have several bee stories to tell. Here's the first
one:

Watching some kids science-guy show one summer morning, he said
how bumblebees can freeze solid, go into suspended animation,
then revive once the temp warms up again. HUH, I thought. I just
had to see that for myself. I went right outside and scooped a
bumblebee on a clover into a jar with lid. Came back inside and
put that jar right into our freezer.

Next morning bee was frozen solid. The whole family gathered
around as I dumped the frozen bumble onto a dinner plate. Small
clink sound as he hit the plate...frozen solid and on his back
with all legs in the air.
We all sat there for about 15 minutes as he slowly warmed up
and....nothing.

A few minutes later though, one leg started slowly moving....then
more legs...eventually the bee turned over and just stood there
on the plate. That's when I took the plate outside and put it on
a porch table in the warm summer air.

Several more minutes and he started walking around the plate,
then flew off.

I was wondering if honey bees have that same ability....(my next
bee story)
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Old 15-02-2019, 02:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:

That's one thing Sheldon can't claim he's ever done: built his own house
from the ground up. Good job!


My own father, although worked for the govt all his career, love
building. He built his very first house from the ground
up...Seriously. Except for a few things, he did it all on
weekends.

Then we moved to a huge barely finished house...bought at a bank
auction. We lived in that one for years as my Dad slowly finished
it....Just like Terry is doing. The first year or so, my bedroom
had no sheetrock. I used all the cross 2x4s as shelves.

Plywood floors for years, etc, etc etc....
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Old 15-02-2019, 03:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/15/2019 9:16 AM, Gary wrote:
jmcquown wrote:

That's one thing Sheldon can't claim he's ever done: built his own house
from the ground up. Good job!


My own father, although worked for the govt all his career, love
building. He built his very first house from the ground
up...Seriously. Except for a few things, he did it all on
weekends.

Then we moved to a huge barely finished house...bought at a bank
auction. We lived in that one for years as my Dad slowly finished
it....Just like Terry is doing. The first year or so, my bedroom
had no sheetrock. I used all the cross 2x4s as shelves.

Plywood floors for years, etc, etc etc....

I thought about it a couple of times, but it is a huge project. I
worked on two houses helping friends doing exactly that. You can save a
bundle of money, but you have to be willing to live unfinished for a
long time too. Would not be so bad it you could take a year off of work.


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