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Old 02-02-2019, 11:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/2/2019 4:55 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 12:14:09 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
I take some solace in the knowledge that any bee that ever stung me paid
the ultimate price for the privilege. Maybe the reason he was never
diagnosed with arthritis was because he had had all those preventative
stings. I have heard that stinging nettles is also good for arthritis,
but I will need more proof before I try it.

He may have been diagnosed with arthritis, but I can't say because I don't know. When I knew him, there seemed to be no signs of that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N7JqkJ2nc0


* One of the reasons we keep so much honey here is because it's good
for our allergies . My wife adds a tablespoon to her daily morning tea ,
I eat more in the spring than any time , that's when my allergies kick
up . That only works though if the honey was harvested in your own area
.... local pollen and all that . Honey also has other medicinal benefits
, I've read about it being used as a kind of antibiotic ointment .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !


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Old 02-02-2019, 11:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 1:18:07 PM UTC-10, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/2/2019 4:55 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 12:14:09 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
I take some solace in the knowledge that any bee that ever stung me paid
the ultimate price for the privilege. Maybe the reason he was never
diagnosed with arthritis was because he had had all those preventative
stings. I have heard that stinging nettles is also good for arthritis,
but I will need more proof before I try it.

He may have been diagnosed with arthritis, but I can't say because I don't know. When I knew him, there seemed to be no signs of that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N7JqkJ2nc0


* One of the reasons we keep so much honey here is because it's good
for our allergies . My wife adds a tablespoon to her daily morning tea ,
I eat more in the spring than any time , that's when my allergies kick
up . That only works though if the honey was harvested in your own area
... local pollen and all that . Honey also has other medicinal benefits
, I've read about it being used as a kind of antibiotic ointment .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !


That's an interesting use for honey. Plants are factories for complex chemical compounds developed over countless generations which they use to protect themselves. Perhaps bees and honey are capable of doing something similar..
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Old 03-02-2019, 12:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 15:52:50 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/2/2019 1:03 PM, wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 21:08:40 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM,
wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:57:45 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/1/2019 6:43 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 1/30/2019 11:04 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
This morning I was looking through the cupboards the jar honey to
fill the honey jar.* There were two half jars and one of them was
buckwheat honey. I had forgotten about that stuff. My wife had picked
it up for me thinking that I love the stuff.* She had overestimated
my attitude about the stuff. It is pretty good, but I only like it
once in a while, which is why it had been put away. It as
crystallized so I had to warm it up to liquefy it.** Good stuff....
once in a while.
I would be completely surprised to find anything other than South
Carolina clover honey.* I've got a jar of it dated 2004 and have yet
to open it.

Jill
* We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in the
cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .
I wonder if there's plastic in it.
No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they sell
it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's door,
they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees don't save
honey because they have much more coming... that's why I don't believe
anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big city slum
tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs sees are
drug dealing *******s.
* Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals used
in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

* And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/ . BOOKMARK THAT LINK

Nothing worth seeing, just an ancient JD toy, likely stopped running
decades ago from the looks of that ripped seat. Anyway Amazon Photo
sucks, takes too long to load and difficult to navigate.


* So you admit that you looked no farther than the first page . BTW ,
that tractor runs like a top , was used earlier today to haul 2 loads of
firewood over to be split and stacked . Of course you'll now call me a
liar again ,


That is NOT a tractor... that's a POS riding lawnmower.
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Old 03-02-2019, 12:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/2/2019 6:26 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 15:52:50 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/2/2019 1:03 PM,
wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 21:08:40 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/1/2019 8:24 PM,
wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2019 12:57:45 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/1/2019 6:43 PM, jmcquown wrote:
On 1/30/2019 11:04 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
This morning I was looking through the cupboards the jar honey to
fill the honey jar.* There were two half jars and one of them was
buckwheat honey. I had forgotten about that stuff. My wife had picked
it up for me thinking that I love the stuff.* She had overestimated
my attitude about the stuff. It is pretty good, but I only like it
once in a while, which is why it had been put away. It as
crystallized so I had to warm it up to liquefy it.** Good stuff....
once in a while.
I would be completely surprised to find anything other than South
Carolina clover honey.* I've got a jar of it dated 2004 and have yet
to open it.

Jill
* We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in the
cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .
I wonder if there's plastic in it.
No one stores nine quarts of honey, they use it, sell it, or give it
away... Coombs is full of BS... anyone seen his hives, I thought not.
I have many neighbors who keep bees, none horde their honey, they sell
it or barter it. I leave home grown veggies at my neighbor's door,
they leave jars of honey at my door. People who keep bees don't save
honey because they have much more coming... that's why I don't believe
anything Coombs claims... he likely lives in some big city slum
tenement basement appartment... NO BEES... only Bs Coombs sees are
drug dealing *******s.
* Are you calling me a liar ? That honey is stocked for MY use and my
wife's . The bees are a varroa mite resistant variety developed by Ed
Levi , a former Arkansas bee inspector - and there are NO chemicals used
in my hives . Here's a link , Ed's business is mentioned
http://www.nwabeekeepers.com/beekeeping/favorite-links . I assume your
reading comprehension is good enough to pick his name out . Just can't
stand anyone that doesn't bend over and kiss your ass can you ?

* And , since you claim I live in a city (we do own a house in Memphis
, my son lives in it) here's a link to my photobucket
http://s991.photobucket.com/user/Snag_one/library/ . BOOKMARK THAT LINK
Nothing worth seeing, just an ancient JD toy, likely stopped running
decades ago from the looks of that ripped seat. Anyway Amazon Photo
sucks, takes too long to load and difficult to navigate.

* So you admit that you looked no farther than the first page . BTW ,
that tractor runs like a top , was used earlier today to haul 2 loads of
firewood over to be split and stacked . Of course you'll now call me a
liar again ,

That is NOT a tractor... that's a POS riding lawnmower.


* No Sir , that is a John Deere model 317 yard tractor . Neither the
mower deck nor the front blade are mounted in those pics . Lawn mowers
don't clear snow from the driveway and the road up to the highway .
Rusty Tractor does . Also works great for clearing paths thru the brush
out in the woods to get to the trees I cut for firewood . And yes , I
admit that I used it a couple of times to mow the brush in the orchard
and the power line easement . We don't have a "lawn" .

* You do realize that the more you criticize and disparage (look it
up)* me the more you look like a fool ? But hey , you're getting
attention so ...

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 03-02-2019, 12:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

In article , says...

On 2/2/2019 4:55 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 12:14:09 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
I take some solace in the knowledge that any bee that ever stung me paid
the ultimate price for the privilege. Maybe the reason he was never
diagnosed with arthritis was because he had had all those preventative
stings. I have heard that stinging nettles is also good for arthritis,
but I will need more proof before I try it.

He may have been diagnosed with arthritis, but I can't say because I don't know. When I knew him, there seemed to be no signs of that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N7JqkJ2nc0

* One of the reasons we keep so much honey here is because it's good
for our allergies . My wife adds a tablespoon to her daily morning tea ,
I eat more in the spring than any time , that's when my allergies kick
up . That only works though if the honey was harvested in your own area
... local pollen and all that . Honey also has other medicinal benefits
, I've read about it being used as a kind of antibiotic ointment .


Manuka honey is used under medicinal prescription (by the NHS) in the
treatment of hard-to-heal wounds and abcesses. Don't use smkt manuka
honey for this; get the medicinally validated and purified prescription
treatments.

manuka homey is from a specific tree "Leptospermum, "tea tree", whose
leaves also have medicinal uses. I grow tea trees in my garden.

Last summer our vet prescribed medical-quality Manuka honey as one of
the applications for healing our greyhound's big open wounds. During a
dog attack he lost a palm-sized area of skin from his side (and a chunk
of underlying muscle) were bitten off him.

Not for the squeamish; in the vet car park before treatment.

https://ibb.co/7CMPxNv

Some of the surrounding skin was unsavable so surgical closure proved
impossible. The wound was left open and treated by daily cleaning and
dressing for the five months it took to heal and grow new skin. I used
two types of (prescribed) topical dressing, one of them manuka honey.

Manuka honey was highly effective from the POV of preventing infection
and tissue healing, but less so from the practical nursing angle as Dog
loved honey so much he could only think about licking it off. I used the
other stuff by day and the honey one at night.

He made a full recovery and as soon as the hair finishes growing in on
the last tiny bald patch of new skin he'll be as good as new.

Janet UK







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Old 03-02-2019, 01:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/3/2019 6:58 AM, Janet wrote:
In article , says...
On 2/2/2019 4:55 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 12:14:09 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
I take some solace in the knowledge that any bee that ever stung me paid
the ultimate price for the privilege. Maybe the reason he was never
diagnosed with arthritis was because he had had all those preventative
stings. I have heard that stinging nettles is also good for arthritis,
but I will need more proof before I try it.
He may have been diagnosed with arthritis, but I can't say because I don't know. When I knew him, there seemed to be no signs of that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N7JqkJ2nc0
* One of the reasons we keep so much honey here is because it's good
for our allergies . My wife adds a tablespoon to her daily morning tea ,
I eat more in the spring than any time , that's when my allergies kick
up . That only works though if the honey was harvested in your own area
... local pollen and all that . Honey also has other medicinal benefits
, I've read about it being used as a kind of antibiotic ointment .

Manuka honey is used under medicinal prescription (by the NHS) in the
treatment of hard-to-heal wounds and abcesses. Don't use smkt manuka
honey for this; get the medicinally validated and purified prescription
treatments.

manuka homey is from a specific tree "Leptospermum, "tea tree", whose
leaves also have medicinal uses. I grow tea trees in my garden.

Last summer our vet prescribed medical-quality Manuka honey as one of
the applications for healing our greyhound's big open wounds. During a
dog attack he lost a palm-sized area of skin from his side (and a chunk
of underlying muscle) were bitten off him.

Not for the squeamish; in the vet car park before treatment.

https://ibb.co/7CMPxNv

Some of the surrounding skin was unsavable so surgical closure proved
impossible. The wound was left open and treated by daily cleaning and
dressing for the five months it took to heal and grow new skin. I used
two types of (prescribed) topical dressing, one of them manuka honey.

Manuka honey was highly effective from the POV of preventing infection
and tissue healing, but less so from the practical nursing angle as Dog
loved honey so much he could only think about licking it off. I used the
other stuff by day and the honey one at night.

He made a full recovery and as soon as the hair finishes growing in on
the last tiny bald patch of new skin he'll be as good as new.

Janet UK





* Unprovoked attack ? I hope the other dog(s) was/were put down ...
they would be if they attacked my dog ! There's a honey from either
Australia or NZ from a specific tree or plantthat is supposed to have
strong medicinal properties . Wish I could remember the name .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 03-02-2019, 03:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2019-02-03 8:28 a.m., heyjoe wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600
in Message-ID:
Terry Coombs wrote :

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in the
cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .


Bought some honey at our farmer's market just before Halloween. Looked
at the still sealed, unopened jar yesterday and it's starting to go to
sugar already. Isn't that a bit soon? Don't know how long it sat on
the shelf at the farmer's market, but would've guessed it was fresh some
time this year, or is that totally off base since it's going to sugar
already? I know about heating the honey in hot water, but that's a
temporary solution, in my experience.

In your experience, how long does it normally take for honey to start
going to sugar? Does filtered vs. unfiltered make a difference?

What are your thoughts and experience with your honey turning to sugar?


It only crystallizes because it is a supersaturated sugar solution. It
will do it faster in cold weather (or cooler house temperatures). It is
not a problem. There is nothing wrong with honey that has granulated.


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Old 03-02-2019, 03:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

In article , says...
up . That only works though if the honey was harvested in your own area
... local pollen and all that . Honey also has other medicinal benefits
, I've read about it being used as a kind of antibiotic ointment .

Manuka honey is used under medicinal prescription (by the NHS) in the
treatment of hard-to-heal wounds and abcesses. Don't use smkt manuka
honey for this; get the medicinally validated and purified prescription
treatments.

manuka homey is from a specific tree "Leptospermum, "tea tree", whose
leaves also have medicinal uses. I grow tea trees in my garden.

Last summer our vet prescribed medical-quality Manuka honey as one of
the applications for healing our greyhound's big open wounds. During a
dog attack he lost a palm-sized area of skin from his side (and a chunk
of underlying muscle) were bitten off him.

Not for the squeamish; in the vet car park before treatment.

https://ibb.co/7CMPxNv

Some of the surrounding skin was unsavable so surgical closure proved
impossible. The wound was left open and treated by daily cleaning and
dressing for the five months it took to heal and grow new skin. I used
two types of (prescribed) topical dressing, one of them manuka honey.

Manuka honey was highly effective from the POV of preventing infection
and tissue healing, but less so from the practical nursing angle as Dog
loved honey so much he could only think about licking it off. I used the
other stuff by day and the honey one at night.

He made a full recovery and as soon as the hair finishes growing in on
the last tiny bald patch of new skin he'll be as good as new.

Janet UK





* Unprovoked attack ?


Yes; out of the blue. My totally laid back non-aggessive dog was on
lead on a public road fully under my control and minding his own
business. As we walked past the farm entrance as we've done a zillion
times before, the farm dogs raced out in pack mode.

I hope the other dog(s) was/were put down ...


No.

They are working sheepdogs. Without them my farm neighbour can't run
his farm or make a living. I know his dogs well and individually they
are harmless, highly trained friendly dogs; normally penned in secure
kennels when not working under his strict control. On this occasion his
wife had let them loose all together for a few minutes while she cleaned
out the kennels. They took off in a pack and reverted to dog pack
behaviour :-(( to repel the passing giant.

By the time we reached the vet surgery the farmer had already phoned
ahead to alert her to incoming emergency and take responsibility for
paying the bill ( which was enormous, after five months of vet care).
They are good neighbours ; we have managed to stay civil,as rural
neighbours must.

they would be if they attacked my dog ! There's a honey from either
Australia or NZ from a specific tree or plantthat is supposed to have
strong medicinal properties . Wish I could remember the name .


I just told you it. Manuka is the Maori name for NZ native
leptospermum scoparium, "tea tree".

Janet UK
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Old 03-02-2019, 06:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/3/2019 9:25 AM, Janet wrote:
In article , says...
up . That only works though if the honey was harvested in your own area
... local pollen and all that . Honey also has other medicinal benefits
, I've read about it being used as a kind of antibiotic ointment .
Manuka honey is used under medicinal prescription (by the NHS) in the
treatment of hard-to-heal wounds and abcesses. Don't use smkt manuka
honey for this; get the medicinally validated and purified prescription
treatments.

manuka homey is from a specific tree "Leptospermum, "tea tree", whose
leaves also have medicinal uses. I grow tea trees in my garden.

Last summer our vet prescribed medical-quality Manuka honey as one of
the applications for healing our greyhound's big open wounds. During a
dog attack he lost a palm-sized area of skin from his side (and a chunk
of underlying muscle) were bitten off him.

Not for the squeamish; in the vet car park before treatment.

https://ibb.co/7CMPxNv

Some of the surrounding skin was unsavable so surgical closure proved
impossible. The wound was left open and treated by daily cleaning and
dressing for the five months it took to heal and grow new skin. I used
two types of (prescribed) topical dressing, one of them manuka honey.

Manuka honey was highly effective from the POV of preventing infection
and tissue healing, but less so from the practical nursing angle as Dog
loved honey so much he could only think about licking it off. I used the
other stuff by day and the honey one at night.

He made a full recovery and as soon as the hair finishes growing in on
the last tiny bald patch of new skin he'll be as good as new.

Janet UK





* Unprovoked attack ?

Yes; out of the blue. My totally laid back non-aggessive dog was on
lead on a public road fully under my control and minding his own
business. As we walked past the farm entrance as we've done a zillion
times before, the farm dogs raced out in pack mode.

I hope the other dog(s) was/were put down ...

No.

They are working sheepdogs. Without them my farm neighbour can't run
his farm or make a living. I know his dogs well and individually they
are harmless, highly trained friendly dogs; normally penned in secure
kennels when not working under his strict control. On this occasion his
wife had let them loose all together for a few minutes while she cleaned
out the kennels. They took off in a pack and reverted to dog pack
behaviour :-(( to repel the passing giant.

By the time we reached the vet surgery the farmer had already phoned
ahead to alert her to incoming emergency and take responsibility for
paying the bill ( which was enormous, after five months of vet care).
They are good neighbours ; we have managed to stay civil,as rural
neighbours must.

they would be if they attacked my dog ! There's a honey from either
Australia or NZ from a specific tree or plantthat is supposed to have
strong medicinal properties . Wish I could remember the name .

I just told you it. Manuka is the Maori name for NZ native
leptospermum scoparium, "tea tree".

Janet UK


* Well at least the owners owned up to their responsibilities , glad
that y'all were able to retain good relations . On the honey , I didn't
realize we were talking about the same thing .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 03-02-2019, 06:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/3/2019 7:28 AM, heyjoe wrote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600
in Message-ID:
Terry Coombs wrote :

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in the
cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .

Bought some honey at our farmer's market just before Halloween. Looked
at the still sealed, unopened jar yesterday and it's starting to go to
sugar already. Isn't that a bit soon? Don't know how long it sat on
the shelf at the farmer's market, but would've guessed it was fresh some
time this year, or is that totally off base since it's going to sugar
already? I know about heating the honey in hot water, but that's a
temporary solution, in my experience.

In your experience, how long does it normally take for honey to start
going to sugar? Does filtered vs. unfiltered make a difference?

What are your thoughts and experience with your honey turning to sugar?


* I have never had a jar of our honey crystallize . The longest we've
held any of our honey is just over a year , one bottle we finished off
after harvest last summer . It may depend on the source of the nectar ,
certainly is affected by the residual moisture content of the honey -
ours is a little more runny than most store-bought - and how it's been
stored . How it's processed may have something to do with it , honey is
often heated to pasteurize and make it runnier and easier to push thru
filters . Ours is never raised above room temperature and is strained
only thru cheesecloth to remove bee parts (!) and wax fragments from the
extraction process . Our label states "raw unfiltered wildflower honey
from untreated bees" because that's exactly what it is . We use NO
chemicals in our hives , these bees are bred to control varroa mites
without treatments .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !



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Old 03-02-2019, 07:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 07:28:30 -0600, heyjoe
wrote:

On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 19:38:30 -0600
in Message-ID:
Terry Coombs wrote :

We still have 9 quarts of raw unfiltered wildflower honey down in the
cellar . Not even labeled since I didn't intend on selling it .


Bought some honey at our farmer's market just before Halloween. Looked
at the still sealed, unopened jar yesterday and it's starting to go to
sugar already. Isn't that a bit soon? Don't know how long it sat on
the shelf at the farmer's market, but would've guessed it was fresh some
time this year, or is that totally off base since it's going to sugar
already? I know about heating the honey in hot water, but that's a
temporary solution, in my experience.

In your experience, how long does it normally take for honey to start
going to sugar? Does filtered vs. unfiltered make a difference?

What are your thoughts and experience with your honey turning to sugar?


Honey does not turn to sugar, honey crystalizes but it's still
honey... with gentle heating it'll become liquified.
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Old 04-02-2019, 12:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 07:28:30 -0600, heyjoe
wrote:

What are your thoughts and experience with your honey turning to sugar?


An essay on maple-syrup making (citation lost in the mists of time)
said that syrup must weigh exactly eleven pounds to the gallon. Any
thinner, and it's likely to spoil. Any thicker, and it will
crystallize.

Honey weighs twelve pounds to the gallon. It's remarkable that it
stays fluid as long as it does.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
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Old 04-02-2019, 02:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/3/2019 6:14 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 07:28:30 -0600, heyjoe
wrote:

What are your thoughts and experience with your honey turning to sugar?

An essay on maple-syrup making (citation lost in the mists of time)
said that syrup must weigh exactly eleven pounds to the gallon. Any
thinner, and it's likely to spoil. Any thicker, and it will
crystallize.

Honey weighs twelve pounds to the gallon. It's remarkable that it
stays fluid as long as it does.

* If I remember the numbers correctly (I didn't , had to look it up) ,
honey averages around 17% water . Much more and it ferments , much less
and it crystallizes . Ours has never been checked , but neither ferments
nor crystallizes so it must be about right .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 04-02-2019, 01:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

Terry Coombs wrote:

What do honey bees do in the winter (or at least on cold days),
Terry? Hibernate, I assume.

I had an odd encounter with a honey bee one nice warm day that
then turned extremely cold within an hour. It was 2-3 years ago
in January or February. I'll tell the story once you tell me how
they normally spend winter days.
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Old 04-02-2019, 04:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Honey score in the cupboard

On 2/4/2019 7:35 AM, Gary wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
What do honey bees do in the winter (or at least on cold days),
Terry? Hibernate, I assume.

I had an odd encounter with a honey bee one nice warm day that
then turned extremely cold within an hour. It was 2-3 years ago
in January or February. I'll tell the story once you tell me how
they normally spend winter days.


* When the temps drop below about 40-50°F they cluster up in a ball .
Usually in the center of the hive , but the cluster can be anywhere .
There is a constant circulation of bees from inside to outside and back
, their body heat produced warms the cluster but not the hive itself .*
On warm days they break cluster and go on "cleansing" flights - gotta
take an occasional dump ya know .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !



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