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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2019, 05:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default sugarless drinks

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 6:17:02 PM UTC-8, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 03 Jan 2019 04:06:22a, l not -l told us...



It was probably a regional thing. Back in those days, most widely
sold soda was produced by local/regional bottlers who bought syrup
from the "names", mixed, bottled and distributed it.

Most of my knowledge of soda from "back in the day" came not from
drinking it but from stocking the coolers in my grandfather's
store. Soda was a very occasional treat for us, maybe one every
few weeks. But, I do recall that in western Ky in the 50s, at one
time we sold the small bottles of Coke, 7 Up and Dr Pepper.
Regional brands, Royal Crown, Sun Crest, Bubble Up, Double Cola,
Grapette, etc came in larger bottles, 10 or 12 ounce. The
regionals outsold the nationals due to more for the same $$. When
the "nationals" became available at our store, their sales
improved. By the time we sold the store in 1960, top sellers were
Royal Crown, Dr Pepper and Sun Crest Orange.


Yes, back in the 1950s and probably befoe that, thru at least the
1960s, there were a huge number of bottlers, mostly regional. I
frequently visited my grandparents in Mississippi and always enjoyed
the many fruit flavoars not available where my home was in Ohio.
Most did come in 10 or 12 ounce bottles. You mentioned Grapette, and
there was also Nugrape. I liked both. Of the colas Royal Crown and
Double Cola ere very popular in the south, perhaps even more popular
than Coke. These many years later I can't remember all the flavors
but two of my favorites were a berry flavored drink and anotehr one
that was almost a flourescent green in color and I think it was a
lemon-lime, heavier on the lime. I'd really like to revisit all
these some day, but that's not likely to happen.


I don't know about "regional." Royal Crown sold well into the
Midwest. Pizza delivery places carried it as opposed to Coke or
Pepsi, and they sold it cheaper. And Royal Crown produced the first
big diet soda, Diet Rite, available widely.

Regional brands I think of names like Faygo in Detroit or Canfield's in
Chicago.

  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2019, 04:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 5,831
Default sugarless drinks

On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 21:25:46 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 6:17:02 PM UTC-8, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 03 Jan 2019 04:06:22a, l not -l told us...



It was probably a regional thing. Back in those days, most widely
sold soda was produced by local/regional bottlers who bought syrup
from the "names", mixed, bottled and distributed it.

Most of my knowledge of soda from "back in the day" came not from
drinking it but from stocking the coolers in my grandfather's
store. Soda was a very occasional treat for us, maybe one every
few weeks. But, I do recall that in western Ky in the 50s, at one
time we sold the small bottles of Coke, 7 Up and Dr Pepper.
Regional brands, Royal Crown, Sun Crest, Bubble Up, Double Cola,
Grapette, etc came in larger bottles, 10 or 12 ounce. The
regionals outsold the nationals due to more for the same $$. When
the "nationals" became available at our store, their sales
improved. By the time we sold the store in 1960, top sellers were
Royal Crown, Dr Pepper and Sun Crest Orange.


Yes, back in the 1950s and probably befoe that, thru at least the
1960s, there were a huge number of bottlers, mostly regional. I
frequently visited my grandparents in Mississippi and always enjoyed
the many fruit flavoars not available where my home was in Ohio.
Most did come in 10 or 12 ounce bottles. You mentioned Grapette, and
there was also Nugrape. I liked both. Of the colas Royal Crown and
Double Cola ere very popular in the south, perhaps even more popular
than Coke. These many years later I can't remember all the flavors
but two of my favorites were a berry flavored drink and anotehr one
that was almost a flourescent green in color and I think it was a
lemon-lime, heavier on the lime. I'd really like to revisit all
these some day, but that's not likely to happen.


I don't know about "regional." Royal Crown sold well into the
Midwest. Pizza delivery places carried it as opposed to Coke or
Pepsi, and they sold it cheaper. And Royal Crown produced the first
big diet soda, Diet Rite, available widely.

Regional brands I think of names like Faygo in Detroit or Canfield's in
Chicago.


In Brooklyn we had Good Health Seltza in siphon bottles delivered...
the company also delivered White Rock beverages.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rock_Beverages
https://www.patheos.com/blogs/rachel...age-co-s-girl/
http://www.whiterockbeverages.com/
The White Rock girl is still my favorite logo.
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2019, 04:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,664
Default sugarless drinks

On Saturday, January 5, 2019 at 8:00:55 AM UTC-8, Sheldon wrote:
On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 21:25:46 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 6:17:02 PM UTC-8, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 03 Jan 2019 04:06:22a, l not -l told us...



It was probably a regional thing. Back in those days, most widely
sold soda was produced by local/regional bottlers who bought syrup
from the "names", mixed, bottled and distributed it.

Most of my knowledge of soda from "back in the day" came not from
drinking it but from stocking the coolers in my grandfather's
store. Soda was a very occasional treat for us, maybe one every
few weeks. But, I do recall that in western Ky in the 50s, at one
time we sold the small bottles of Coke, 7 Up and Dr Pepper.
Regional brands, Royal Crown, Sun Crest, Bubble Up, Double Cola,
Grapette, etc came in larger bottles, 10 or 12 ounce. The
regionals outsold the nationals due to more for the same $$. When
the "nationals" became available at our store, their sales
improved. By the time we sold the store in 1960, top sellers were
Royal Crown, Dr Pepper and Sun Crest Orange.


Yes, back in the 1950s and probably befoe that, thru at least the
1960s, there were a huge number of bottlers, mostly regional. I
frequently visited my grandparents in Mississippi and always enjoyed
the many fruit flavoars not available where my home was in Ohio.
Most did come in 10 or 12 ounce bottles. You mentioned Grapette, and
there was also Nugrape. I liked both. Of the colas Royal Crown and
Double Cola ere very popular in the south, perhaps even more popular
than Coke. These many years later I can't remember all the flavors
but two of my favorites were a berry flavored drink and anotehr one
that was almost a flourescent green in color and I think it was a
lemon-lime, heavier on the lime. I'd really like to revisit all
these some day, but that's not likely to happen.


I don't know about "regional." Royal Crown sold well into the
Midwest. Pizza delivery places carried it as opposed to Coke or
Pepsi, and they sold it cheaper. And Royal Crown produced the first
big diet soda, Diet Rite, available widely.

Regional brands I think of names like Faygo in Detroit or Canfield's in
Chicago.


In Brooklyn we had Good Health Seltza in siphon bottles delivered...
the company also delivered White Rock beverages.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rock_Beverages
https://www.patheos.com/blogs/rachel...age-co-s-girl/
http://www.whiterockbeverages.com/
The White Rock girl is still my favorite logo.


White Rock spring water originally came from Waukesha, Wisconsin,
which was once so popular that a promoter started to build a pipeline
to Chicago in time for the 1893 World's Fair.

Unfortunately, nowadays, local residents and farmers have pumped
down the water table 100 feet,reaching a radium contaminated level.
And now they are crying for Lake Michigan Water.

https://daily.jstor.org/clash-over-w...sha-wisconsin/

http://hellodrew.com/websites/spring...chapter04.html
https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Rec...operty/HI29559

https://www.npr.org/2011/12/05/14305...fter-140-years


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