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Old 15-04-2018, 08:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Cheri wrote:


On 4/14/2018 3:16 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message


In the part of the country where I come from and live, chili
mac is a separately prepared skillet dish.¬ Brown some ground
beef, onions and bell pepper also some celery if you like.¬
Season with salt and pepper, add a can of tomato sauce.¬ Add
some cooked elbow macaroni. Also sometimes called American
Spaghetti.¬ It doesn't in any way bring to mind a bowl of chili
in looks, taste or smell.¬ There is no chili poured over any
kind of pasta.¬ I've never seen what you describe. But,
whatever floats everyone's boat. Janet US

That makes no sense! Why would the word chili be in there? That
sounds like what some people call goulash or macaroni, beef and
tomatoes.


I suppose for the same reason that sloppy joe's are called a name, or
hot dogs are called a name when there certainly is no dog or Joe in
them. It's what people I know called chili mac in my time, don't know
about now.

Cheri


I think the term 'chili' throws some off. Chili itself is often
defined to a fairly specific expectation of taste and looks in the USA.
None of them ae really wrong or right, but a LOT are fairly regional.

If we take it down the the true basics, if it uses mostly chile powder
for the seasoning, it probably will get called 'chili'/Chile someplace
here. It is often served with or on beans but some serve it over rice
or pasta. It's probably when it's mixed in with the pasta or rice, that
the name shifts a bit.

Cheri, to me 'Chili Mac' starts with a mild meat and tomato based
liquid 'chili' that is then mixed in with the pasta. It's possibly one
of our more classic well known dishes in the USA.

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Old 15-04-2018, 09:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 15-Apr-2018, "cshenk" wrote:

Cheri wrote:


On 4/14/2018 3:16 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message


In the part of the country where I come from and live,
chili
mac is a separately prepared skillet dish.¬ Brown some
ground
beef, onions and bell pepper also some celery if you
like.¬
Season with salt and pepper, add a can of tomato
sauce.¬ Add
some cooked elbow macaroni. Also sometimes called
American
Spaghetti.¬ It doesn't in any way bring to mind a bowl
of chili
in looks, taste or smell.¬ There is no chili poured
over any
kind of pasta.¬ I've never seen what you describe.
But,
whatever floats everyone's boat. Janet US

That makes no sense! Why would the word chili be in
there? That
sounds like what some people call goulash or macaroni,
beef and
tomatoes.


I suppose for the same reason that sloppy joe's are called a
name, or
hot dogs are called a name when there certainly is no dog or
Joe in
them. It's what people I know called chili mac in my time,
don't know
about now.

Cheri


I think the term 'chili' throws some off. Chili itself is
often
defined to a fairly specific expectation of taste and looks in
the USA.
None of them ae really wrong or right, but a LOT are fairly
regional.

If we take it down the the true basics, if it uses mostly chile
powder
for the seasoning, it probably will get called 'chili'/Chile
someplace
here. It is often served with or on beans but some serve it
over rice
or pasta. It's probably when it's mixed in with the pasta or
rice, that
the name shifts a bit.

Cheri, to me 'Chili Mac' starts with a mild meat and tomato
based
liquid 'chili' that is then mixed in with the pasta. It's
possibly one
of our more classic well known dishes in the USA.


In chili mac, the mac is just as confounding to many folks as the
chili 8-). Many in the US think macaroni is elbow macaroni;
when, the reality is, macaroni is a kind of pasta that comes in
many shapes, one of them being elbow, another is spaghetti.
Every package of dry spaghetti I have seen says Enriched Macaroni
Product, as do the packages of vermicelli, penne, etc. I have
never ordered chili mac in a restaurant/diner and had it served
on elbow macaroni, it's always been served to me on spaghetti. I
have only ever heard of it being served on elbow macaroni by home
cooks; perhaps because that is what they had on hand or because
many Americans think macaroni only means elbow.

--
Change cujo to juno to make a valid email address.

I raise a glass in toast to macaroni in all it glorious forms.
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Old 15-04-2018, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 15 Apr 2018 20:41:25 GMT, "l not -l" wrote:

snip

In chili mac, the mac is just as confounding to many folks as the
chili 8-). Many in the US think macaroni is elbow macaroni;
when, the reality is, macaroni is a kind of pasta that comes in
many shapes, one of them being elbow, another is spaghetti.
Every package of dry spaghetti I have seen says Enriched Macaroni
Product, as do the packages of vermicelli, penne, etc. I have
never ordered chili mac in a restaurant/diner and had it served
on elbow macaroni, it's always been served to me on spaghetti. I
have only ever heard of it being served on elbow macaroni by home
cooks; perhaps because that is what they had on hand or because
many Americans think macaroni only means elbow.


I doubt many Americans today think that the only pasta is elbow
macaroni . As has been mentioned in this thread, there are regional
differences in the way chili mac is prepared. How it is prepared
today has a lot to do with tradition. Italians didn't emigrate and
populate all of the US, they pretty much stuck to the NE. Knowledge
of different ethnic food didn't freely mingle throughout the country.
Each immigrant population tended to keep to their own foods and
ingredients they knew.
Janet US
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Old 15-04-2018, 11:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"l not -l" wrote in message
...

On 15-Apr-2018, "cshenk" wrote:

Cheri wrote:


On 4/14/2018 3:16 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message

In the part of the country where I come from and live,
chili
mac is a separately prepared skillet dish.¬ Brown some
ground
beef, onions and bell pepper also some celery if you
like.¬
Season with salt and pepper, add a can of tomato
sauce.¬ Add
some cooked elbow macaroni. Also sometimes called
American
Spaghetti.¬ It doesn't in any way bring to mind a bowl
of chili
in looks, taste or smell.¬ There is no chili poured
over any
kind of pasta.¬ I've never seen what you describe.
But,
whatever floats everyone's boat. Janet US

That makes no sense! Why would the word chili be in
there? That
sounds like what some people call goulash or macaroni,
beef and
tomatoes.

I suppose for the same reason that sloppy joe's are called a
name, or
hot dogs are called a name when there certainly is no dog or
Joe in
them. It's what people I know called chili mac in my time,
don't know
about now.

Cheri


I think the term 'chili' throws some off. Chili itself is
often
defined to a fairly specific expectation of taste and looks in
the USA.
None of them ae really wrong or right, but a LOT are fairly
regional.

If we take it down the the true basics, if it uses mostly chile
powder
for the seasoning, it probably will get called 'chili'/Chile
someplace
here. It is often served with or on beans but some serve it
over rice
or pasta. It's probably when it's mixed in with the pasta or
rice, that
the name shifts a bit.

Cheri, to me 'Chili Mac' starts with a mild meat and tomato
based
liquid 'chili' that is then mixed in with the pasta. It's
possibly one
of our more classic well known dishes in the USA.


In chili mac, the mac is just as confounding to many folks as the
chili 8-). Many in the US think macaroni is elbow macaroni;
when, the reality is, macaroni is a kind of pasta that comes in
many shapes, one of them being elbow, another is spaghetti.
Every package of dry spaghetti I have seen says Enriched Macaroni
Product, as do the packages of vermicelli, penne, etc. I have
never ordered chili mac in a restaurant/diner and had it served
on elbow macaroni, it's always been served to me on spaghetti. I
have only ever heard of it being served on elbow macaroni by home
cooks; perhaps because that is what they had on hand or because
many Americans think macaroni only means elbow.


My ex husband's grandma referred to all pasta as macaroni. She was Italian.

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Old 15-04-2018, 11:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2018-04-15 6:23 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

.¬* I have
never ordered chili mac in a restaurant/diner and had it served
on elbow macaroni, it's always been served to me on spaghetti.¬* I
have only ever heard of it being served on elbow macaroni by home
cooks; perhaps because that is what they had on hand or because
many Americans think macaroni only means elbow.


My ex husband's grandma referred to all pasta as macaroni. She was Italian.


I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne, spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.


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Old 16-04-2018, 12:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 15-Apr-2018, U.S. Janet B. wrote:

On Sun, 15 Apr 2018 20:41:25 GMT, "l not -l"
wrote:

snip

In chili mac, the mac is just as confounding to many folks as
the
chili 8-). Many in the US think macaroni is elbow macaroni;
when, the reality is, macaroni is a kind of pasta that comes
in
many shapes, one of them being elbow, another is spaghetti.
Every package of dry spaghetti I have seen says Enriched
Macaroni
Product, as do the packages of vermicelli, penne, etc. I have
never ordered chili mac in a restaurant/diner and had it
served
on elbow macaroni, it's always been served to me on spaghetti.
I
have only ever heard of it being served on elbow macaroni by
home
cooks; perhaps because that is what they had on hand or
because
many Americans think macaroni only means elbow.


I doubt many Americans today think that the only pasta is elbow
macaroni .


Actually, that is not what I said; I didn't say Americans think
elbow is the only pasta, I said they think elbow is the only
macaroni. I'm sure most Americans know there are many kinds of
pasta. What I think most Americans don't know is that macaroni
comes in many shapes, not just elbow.

As has been mentioned in this thread, there are
regional
differences in the way chili mac is prepared. How it is
prepared
today has a lot to do with tradition. Italians didn't emigrate
and
populate all of the US, they pretty much stuck to the NE.
Knowledge
of different ethnic food didn't freely mingle throughout the
country.
Each immigrant population tended to keep to their own foods and
ingredients they knew.
Janet US



--
Change cujo to juno to make a valid email address.

I'm easy to get along with when things go my way.
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Old 16-04-2018, 12:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 15 Apr 2018 23:06:08 GMT, "l not -l" wrote:
snip

Actually, that is not what I said; I didn't say Americans think
elbow is the only pasta, I said they think elbow is the only
macaroni. I'm sure most Americans know there are many kinds of
pasta. What I think most Americans don't know is that macaroni
comes in many shapes, not just elbow.

If it pleases you to think of us that way, knock yourself out.
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Old 16-04-2018, 12:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sunday, April 15, 2018 at 12:50:45 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:

I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne, spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.


Them Italian don't know nothing about pasta!
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Old 16-04-2018, 12:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 15 Apr 2018 23:06:08 GMT, "l not -l" wrote:


On 15-Apr-2018, U.S. Janet B. wrote:

On Sun, 15 Apr 2018 20:41:25 GMT, "l not -l"
wrote:

many Americans think macaroni only means elbow.


I doubt many Americans today think that the only pasta is elbow
macaroni .


Actually, that is not what I said; I didn't say Americans think
elbow is the only pasta, I said they think elbow is the only
macaroni. I'm sure most Americans know there are many kinds of
pasta. What I think most Americans don't know is that macaroni
comes in many shapes, not just elbow.


I think the same is true of most European countries. Macaroni is
elbow.
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Old 16-04-2018, 02:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 15-Apr-2018, U.S. Janet B. wrote:

On Sun, 15 Apr 2018 23:06:08 GMT, "l not -l"
wrote:
snip

Actually, that is not what I said; I didn't say Americans
think
elbow is the only pasta, I said they think elbow is the only
macaroni. I'm sure most Americans know there are many kinds
of
pasta. What I think most Americans don't know is that
macaroni
comes in many shapes, not just elbow.

If it pleases you to think of us that way, knock yourself out.

I am one of "us" Americans and I think that way based upon 70
years of interaction with others of "us" from around the country.
But, you appear to be more knowledgeable of macaroni than most I
have encountered.

--
Change cujo to juno to make a valid email address.

I'm easy to get along with when things go my way.


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Old 16-04-2018, 06:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On Sunday, April 15, 2018 at 12:50:45 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:

I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne, spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.


Them Italian don't know nothing about pasta!


I know. Right? Came from China.

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Old 16-04-2018, 11:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, April 16, 2018 at 1:15:13 AM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:
"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On Sunday, April 15, 2018 at 12:50:45 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:

I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne, spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.


Them Italian don't know nothing about pasta!


I know. Right? Came from China.


No, it didn't. Pasta in Europe predates Marco Polo.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 16-04-2018, 12:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Mon, 16 Apr 2018 03:59:04 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Monday, April 16, 2018 at 1:15:13 AM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:
"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On Sunday, April 15, 2018 at 12:50:45 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:

I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne, spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.

Them Italian don't know nothing about pasta!


I know. Right? Came from China.


No, it didn't. Pasta in Europe predates Marco Polo.


Cindy's been Googling again and she found a Cro Magnon man who made a
dough by mistake. You know so much, Cindy.
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Old 16-04-2018, 12:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, April 16, 2018 at 7:16:14 AM UTC-4, Bruce wrote:
On Mon, 16 Apr 2018 03:59:04 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Monday, April 16, 2018 at 1:15:13 AM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:
"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On Sunday, April 15, 2018 at 12:50:45 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:

I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne, spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.

Them Italian don't know nothing about pasta!

I know. Right? Came from China.


No, it didn't. Pasta in Europe predates Marco Polo.


Cindy's been Googling again and she found a Cro Magnon man who made a
dough by mistake. You know so much, Cindy.


Cindy already knew this piece of information, but here's a link for you
anyway:

https://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/01/17/1042520764078.html

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 16-04-2018, 12:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Bruce" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 16 Apr 2018 03:59:04 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Monday, April 16, 2018 at 1:15:13 AM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:
"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On Sunday, April 15, 2018 at 12:50:45 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:

I have an Italian friend who does the same. Macaroni, penne,
spaghetti,
linquini..... it's all macaroni.

Them Italian don't know nothing about pasta!

I know. Right? Came from China.


No, it didn't. Pasta in Europe predates Marco Polo.


Cindy's been Googling again and she found a Cro Magnon man who made a
dough by mistake. You know so much, Cindy.


Hmmm... This article says Greece or the Arabs.

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index....ly-from-italy/



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