General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2018, 08:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,564
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 09:17:13 -0500, Nancy Young
wrote:

On 2/10/2018 8:50 AM, JBurns wrote:

When I was a small child she never left the house without hat and
gloves, stockings too. By the 1970s she had stopped such things.


I've heard (well, seen) people say they miss the old days when
people got dressed up to go shopping, or worse, the airport.
Comfort is more important these days. If I'm clean and neat,
it'll have to be good enough.

nancy


Years ago travel accomodations were far more comfortable, even tourist
class seating on planes was more spacious than today's first class.
Today's automobiles are made for midgets... a late model Mercedes
hasn't much more seating space than a VW bug. I used to drive a '78
Eldorado... about a year ago I had the occasion to sit in the rear
seat of a new Caddy, no leg room and I'm barely 6', I had to sit
sideways. My old Eldorado could easily seat six NBAers.

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2018, 09:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,564
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 11:23:33 -0500, Nancy Young
wrote:

On 2/10/2018 9:58 AM, jmcquown wrote:
On 2/10/2018 9:17 AM, Nancy Young wrote:


I've heard (well, seen) people say they miss the old days when
people got dressed up to go shopping, or worse, the airport.
Comfort is more important these days.* If I'm clean and neat,
it'll have to be good enough.


I vaguely remember those Jackie Kennedy days.


If I was Jackie Kennedy I'd dress up all the time, too, because
every day she stepped out the door there were photographers. My idea
of hell.

I have a drawer full of
gloves my mother owned.* Long gloves for formal occasions (Marine Corps
Ball, no doubt) and short gloves for when she was going to a luncheon. I
have a couple of her old hats, too.* I don't remember her wearing them
to go shopping, though.


I came across some gloves at my mother's house, even a couple of
old hats. I don't recall ever seeing her wear anything like that.

nancy


My mom had a collection of formal gloves and hats that she wore most
every time she stepped outdoors, in winter she'd go grocery shopping
with her wire cart (she ddiddn't drive) while wearing her persian lamb
winter coat... she also sometimes wore fox stoles, with heads and feet
attached. Fashions of those times were very different.
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-02-2018, 12:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3,844
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 10:23:38 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:

On 2/10/2018 9:58 AM, jmcquown wrote:

I've heard (well, seen) people say they miss the old days when
people got dressed up to go shopping, or worse, the airport.

My sister-in-law's mother was a buyer for one of the exclusive
women's store here in the 60's. Three or four times a year she
would fly to New York to buy the coming season clothes. I can
remember riding to the airport to see her off for about 10 days.
She, and all the other women, were dressed to the nines for their
flights.

That's back when you could actually walk out on the tarmac and
watch them board and watch the plane take off.

I came across some gloves at my mother's house, even a couple of
old hats. I don't recall ever seeing her wear anything like that.

nancy


I don't remember my mother wearing gloves but I do remember her
wearing a hat to church every Sunday. She finally stopped wearing
a hat to services sometime in the 70's.

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-02-2018, 01:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 11,488
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 15:39:22 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 10:23:38 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:

On 2/10/2018 9:58 AM, jmcquown wrote:

I've heard (well, seen) people say they miss the old days when
people got dressed up to go shopping, or worse, the airport.

My sister-in-law's mother was a buyer for one of the exclusive
women's store here in the 60's. Three or four times a year she
would fly to New York to buy the coming season clothes. I can
remember riding to the airport to see her off for about 10 days.
She, and all the other women, were dressed to the nines for their
flights.


I regularly flew London/HK/Tokyo back then and stupid though it was,
one was dressed to the 9s in high heels, gloves and hats. Hats were
the most stupid for all the seats were far more generous than they are
now, hats were not comfortable.

That's back when you could actually walk out on the tarmac and
watch them board and watch the plane take off.

I came across some gloves at my mother's house, even a couple of
old hats. I don't recall ever seeing her wear anything like that.

nancy


I remember, probably around the early 60s, causing consternation at a
cocktail party by pinning a small ribbon bow in my hair (it was long
and braided up) and not wearing a hat. OMG, no hat!!!

Funny thing is through rec. food. recipes I made contact over a recipe
with somebody who turned out to have been USN in Tokyo. After much
chat he asked me if I was the girl at the US Embassy cocktail party
who just wore a feather stuck into my up braids, rather than a
'proper' hat lol It was I, what a strange thing to make a memory.
I don't remember my mother wearing gloves but I do remember her
wearing a hat to church every Sunday. She finally stopped wearing
a hat to services sometime in the 70's.

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-02-2018, 02:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3,844
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 6:51:06 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I remember, probably around the early 60s, causing consternation at a
cocktail party by pinning a small ribbon bow in my hair (it was long
and braided up) and not wearing a hat. OMG, no hat!!!


Did you watch Catherine and William's wedding on TV? There were some
beautiful hats/fascinators and some quite strange ones as well. I can't
remember who it was but there was one woman there who wore a netted hair
covering instead of a hat. There was some surprise at this covering by
the commentators instead of a hat.


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-02-2018, 01:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 11,488
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 17:58:13 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 6:51:06 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I remember, probably around the early 60s, causing consternation at a
cocktail party by pinning a small ribbon bow in my hair (it was long
and braided up) and not wearing a hat. OMG, no hat!!!


Did you watch Catherine and William's wedding on TV? There were some
beautiful hats/fascinators and some quite strange ones as well. I can't
remember who it was but there was one woman there who wore a netted hair
covering instead of a hat. There was some surprise at this covering by
the commentators instead of a hat.


Go woman, go I just saw bits of it but know she has bought the
fashion in for fascinators, good luck to them all. I really can't
stand hats or scarves round the neck and apparently that is fairly
common amongst migrainers.
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-02-2018, 04:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3,844
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Sunday, February 11, 2018 at 6:25:32 AM UTC-6, wrote:
I really can't
stand hats or scarves round the neck and apparently that is fairly
common amongst migrainers.


I have no problem with a winter mufflers when it's extremely cold but
hats and scarves are another matter. My head gets too hot and then
I begin to scratch because my head is sweltering. If it's windy and
quite cold I will wear ear pockets. (Ear muffs without the connecting
band.)

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-02-2018, 02:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 559
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 5:14:33 PM UTC-5, wrote:


But that leaves one potentially awkward situation that the book didn't mention - namely, when guests are allowed to fill their OWN plates - from platters that are passed around the table. See here (it's a 1965 Ann Landers column):

https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=MT19650607.2.80

So it got me to wondering - chances are the in-laws were just selfish, greedy boors, but there could be more to it, unfortunately. ARE there many cultures where guests are truly expected just to eat as much as they like and not to care much about whether or not the host can afford it?



Can we please get back to my question? Thank you.


Lenona.


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-02-2018, 04:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3,844
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 7:27:57 PM UTC-6, wrote:

Can we please get back to my question? Thank you.

Lenona.


Subject has probably been exhausted.

  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-02-2018, 12:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 6,644
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 8:27:57 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 5:14:33 PM UTC-5, wrote:


But that leaves one potentially awkward situation that the book didn't mention - namely, when guests are allowed to fill their OWN plates - from platters that are passed around the table. See here (it's a 1965 Ann Landers column):

https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=MT19650607.2.80

So it got me to wondering - chances are the in-laws were just selfish, greedy boors, but there could be more to it, unfortunately. ARE there many cultures where guests are truly expected just to eat as much as they like and not to care much about whether or not the host can afford it?



Can we please get back to my question? Thank you.


Probably not. After all, this is Usenet.

Cindy Hamilton

  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-02-2018, 02:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,882
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 5:02:24 AM UTC-6, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 8:27:57 PM UTC-5, wrote:

....
Can we please get back to my question? Thank you.


Probably not. After all, this is Usenet.

Cindy Hamilton


After all, Usenet is packed with EGOCENTRIC LITTLE CHILDREN!! Who honestly feel they are the ONLY humans on the face of the planet! Especially when it comes to FOOD!

John Kuthe...
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-02-2018, 02:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 209
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On 2/13/2018 6:02 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 8:27:57 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 5:14:33 PM UTC-5, wrote:


But that leaves one potentially awkward situation that the book didn't mention - namely, when guests are allowed to fill their OWN plates - from platters that are passed around the table. See here (it's a 1965 Ann Landers column):

https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=MT19650607.2.80

So it got me to wondering - chances are the in-laws were just selfish, greedy boors, but there could be more to it, unfortunately. ARE there many cultures where guests are truly expected just to eat as much as they like and not to care much about whether or not the host can afford it?



Can we please get back to my question? Thank you.


Probably not. After all, this is Usenet.


I don't care if it's a cocktail party, the conversation moves on.

nancy
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-02-2018, 04:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 11,488
Default "Eat lightly when you're a guest" - question

On Tue, 13 Feb 2018 05:34:31 -0800 (PST), John Kuthe
wrote:

On Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 5:02:24 AM UTC-6, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 8:27:57 PM UTC-5, wrote:

...
Can we please get back to my question? Thank you.


Probably not. After all, this is Usenet.

Cindy Hamilton


After all, Usenet is packed with EGOCENTRIC LITTLE CHILDREN!! Who honestly feel they are the ONLY humans on the face of the planet! Especially when it comes to FOOD!

John Kuthe...


Wow! There should be a word, or emoticon, that registers more than
just plain old irony !


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Irrational Search for Micrograms (of Animal Parts) proves that"veganism" isn't about so-called "factory farms" at all Rudy Canoza[_8_] Vegan 0 19-08-2016 06:04 PM
Ask Amy: Vegetarian hosts, guest on "white diet" Lenona General Cooking 3 31-01-2012 12:20 AM
BLIMPS REJOICE! "Grilled" At KFC Means You Can Gobble More Pieces OfChicken Than The Original "Boogies On A Bone" Fried Artery-Cloggers! Lil' Barb Barbecue 4 18-05-2009 11:22 PM
FDA says "no" in Tomato connection to reduced cancer risk: From "Sham vs. Wham: The Health Insider" D. Vegan 0 11-07-2007 05:29 PM
+ Asian Food Experts: Source for "Silver Needle" or "Rat Tail" Noodles? + Chris General Cooking 1 29-12-2006 08:13 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:06 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017