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Default Adulterated garlic powder (with chalk and talc)

I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
abomination and never use them but some do.
http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...193/story.html

"Turmeric cut with corn, nutmeg diluted with pepper and dried oregano
adulterated with other plant matter. Dried spices in particular are
among the most fraudulent foods. Now, a leading food fraud expert is
warning that the garlic powder being sold in grocery stores, including
those in Canada could be tainted.

Prof. Christopher Elliott is making his concerns public after
considering two recent trends: garlic sales remaining steady despite bad
weather in China killing a significant number of crops. Wheres all the
garlic coming from? the director of the Institute for Global Food
Security at Queens University Belfast asked the Canadian Press.

As China produces much of the worlds garlic, Elliott and other
researchers are currently investigating supply chains for evidence of
adulteration with substances such as chalk or talcum powder.

When probing potential cases of food fraud, Elliott told the Canadian
Press that he looks for certain themes: Has there been crop failures?
Are there price wars going on in a particular commodity? Currency
fluctuations are another driving factor (and) political instability and
corruption.

Aline Dimitri, the deputy chief food safety officer for the Canadian
Food Inspection Agency said that a monitoring system is in place, which
examines foods for chemical contamination. We havent really seen any
major deviations in the system that would make us worry, she told the
Canadian Press.

Garlic powder has long been maligned for reasons unrelated to food
fraud. Influential culinary author and teacher James Beard considered
the product an abomination, writing in Beard on Food (Bloomsbury Press):
I consider both garlic powder and salt and onion powder and salt to be
among the more disagreeable of the so-called advances in our eating.

However, if youre hooked on the convenience of the stuff, one way to
ensure its purity is to make it yourself. A few heads of garlic, a
dehydrator and a high-speed blender or spice grinder will yield a
fresher and more potent powder than anything from the store. (Try Joel
MacCharles recipe for Homemade Smoked Garlic Powder on wellpreserved.ca.)"
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:42:28 -0600, graham > wrote:

>I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
>abomination and never use them but some do.
>http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...193/story.html
>

My Kirkland Signature Granulated California Garlic (from Costco) says
made from 100% California-grown fresh garlic that has been dehydrated
and milled to size. Love it I always use fresh garlic when I am
cooking. Sometimes I like a like of garlic on buttered bread or
something. /Both have their place in my kitchen. Never tried garlic
powder
Janet US
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i won't buy that Parmesan cheese anymore, the kind you can sprinkle...

because there's some kind of filler in most [or all] of them

some have wood or sawdust?!

marc
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:15:44 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

>i won't buy that Parmesan cheese anymore, the kind you can sprinkle...
>
>because there's some kind of filler in most [or all] of them
>
>some have wood or sawdust?!


Doesn't it say in the ingredients?
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U.S. Janet B. wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:42:28 -0600, graham > wrote:
>
> > I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
> > abomination and never use them but some do.
> > http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...our+garlic+pow
> > der+food+fraud+expert+warning/13308193/story.html
> >

> My Kirkland Signature Granulated California Garlic (from Costco) says
> made from 100% California-grown fresh garlic that has been dehydrated
> and milled to size. Love it I always use fresh garlic when I am
> cooking. Sometimes I like a like of garlic on buttered bread or
> something. /Both have their place in my kitchen. Never tried garlic
> powder
> Janet US


I don't get mine from the grocery store. I use Savory Spice Shop and
get minced deydrated mostly. I do have some powdered (also from Savory
Spice) but they make it from ground down minced. I use that in my
sausage spice recipe mostly.

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On 2017-04-18, graham > wrote:

> I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
> abomination and never use them but some do.


<http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/there+chalk+talcum+your+garlic+powder+food+fraud+e xpert+warning/13308193/story.html>

I do, now! Try and make this blend with all natural ingredients:

http://www.gumbopages.com/food/creole.html

I did. Subbed chopped onions fer onion salt, subbed chopped fresh
garlic fer garlic salt, yada yada.....

Bottome line, it all sucked and I changed to "powdered" spices fer
rubs, creole boils, etc. They're infinitely better suited fer the
job.


> "Turmeric cut with corn, nutmeg diluted with pepper and dried oregano
> adulterated with ???other plant matter.??? Dried spices in particular are
> among the most fraudulent foods.


Gotta be smarter than the spices. I buy all organic spices from my
local health food store.

nb
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On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 3:42:32 PM UTC-4, graham wrote:
> I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
> abomination and never use them but some do.


I use them occasionally. My most frequent use is probably a
nostalgia salad dressing: cider vinegar with onion powder,
garlic powder, and a shot of a spice blend heavy on paprika.
Extra-virgin olive oil. Tastes like an improved version of
the bottled salad dressings I ate as a child.

Also in a rub I use on flank steak: tomato paste, fish sauce,
onion powder, garlic powder.

Cindy Hamilton


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On 4/18/2017 3:58 PM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:42:28 -0600, graham > wrote:
>
>> I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
>> abomination and never use them but some do.
>> http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...193/story.html
>>

> My Kirkland Signature Granulated California Garlic (from Costco) says
> made from 100% California-grown fresh garlic that has been dehydrated
> and milled to size. Love it I always use fresh garlic when I am
> cooking. Sometimes I like a like of garlic on buttered bread or
> something. /Both have their place in my kitchen. Never tried garlic
> powder


I use Penzey's granulated garlic for things like rubs. I'm a garlic
fiend and by far I use more fresh garlic but the granulated has its
uses. I keep a bag of it in the freezer. Ditto onion.

I trust the Penzey's and Costco products.

nancy
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The FDA could stop such things but they only serve big pharma.
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On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:

>>
>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>
>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>> worry about it in cheap parm.

>
> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
>


If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
cheese.


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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 08:25:05 -0400, Nancy Young
> wrote:

>On 4/18/2017 3:58 PM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
>> On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:42:28 -0600, graham > wrote:
>>
>>> I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
>>> abomination and never use them but some do.
>>> http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...193/story.html
>>>

>> My Kirkland Signature Granulated California Garlic (from Costco) says
>> made from 100% California-grown fresh garlic that has been dehydrated
>> and milled to size. Love it I always use fresh garlic when I am
>> cooking. Sometimes I like a like of garlic on buttered bread or
>> something. /Both have their place in my kitchen. Never tried garlic
>> powder

>
>I use Penzey's granulated garlic for things like rubs. I'm a garlic
>fiend and by far I use more fresh garlic but the granulated has its
>uses. I keep a bag of it in the freezer. Ditto onion.
>
>I trust the Penzey's and Costco products.
>
>nancy


I use lots of bulb garlic too (it's really not fresh, the bulbs are
dried, like onions), fresh garlic still has its green tops, like green
onions. My next door neighbor grows onions and garlic, so
occasionally I'll ask for a few snips of green tops for a salad. I
also use a lot of Penzeys granulated garlic, also their dried minced
garlic. I have no use for garlic powder or garlic salt, I don't use
onion powder or onion salt either, but I do use dehy onions both plain
and toasted. There's no Costco around here but I buy a lot of spices
at BJs, they have a huge selection in restaurant size containers and
at much lower prices than Penzeys. But still there are several
Penzeys products not sold elsewhere, especially their no salt blends.
I think Penzeys chili powder is the best, with no added salt I can use
as much as I like. My favorite Penzeys no salt blend is their Adobo,
can't cook pork without it and rounds out chili,
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:

>On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>
>>>
>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>
>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>> worry about it in cheap parm.

>>
>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.

>
>If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>cheese.


Most any store that sells hard cheese will grate a wedge for you.... I
won't buy pregrated mystery cheese same as I won't buy preground
mystery meat. I buy a wedge of hard cheese and grate it at home as
needed... my box grater does a good job of grating or shaving.
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> wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:
>
>>On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>>
>>>>
>>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>>
>>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>>> worry about it in cheap parm.
>>>
>>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.

>>
>>If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>>just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>>cheese.

>
> Most any store that sells hard cheese will grate a wedge for you.... I
> won't buy pregrated mystery cheese same as I won't buy preground
> mystery meat. I buy a wedge of hard cheese and grate it at home as
> needed... my box grater does a good job of grating or shaving.



The food processor does a really good job of grating hard cheese too.

Cheri

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On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 9:38:03 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
> On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>
> >>
> >> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
> >> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
> >> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
> >>
> >> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
> >> worry about it in cheap parm.

> >
> > I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
> > can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
> >

>
> If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
> just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
> cheese.


Sure. You couldn't keep it in the fridge for a year, though. I
don't know how old our green tube of "parmesan" might be, and the
next time we use it, it will still be as good as ever. I know
our chunk of Parmagiano-Reggiano has been with us less than
a month, and is not likely to last much longer than another
month.

Cindy Hamilton


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On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 9:42:32 AM UTC-10, graham wrote:
> I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
> abomination and never use them but some do.
> http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...193/story.html
>
> "Turmeric cut with corn, nutmeg diluted with pepper and dried oregano
> adulterated with other plant matter. Dried spices in particular are
> among the most fraudulent foods. Now, a leading food fraud expert is
> warning that the garlic powder being sold in grocery stores, including
> those in Canada could be tainted.
>
> Prof. Christopher Elliott is making his concerns public after
> considering two recent trends: garlic sales remaining steady despite bad
> weather in China killing a significant number of crops. Wheres all the
> garlic coming from? the director of the Institute for Global Food
> Security at Queens University Belfast asked the Canadian Press.
>
> As China produces much of the worlds garlic, Elliott and other
> researchers are currently investigating supply chains for evidence of
> adulteration with substances such as chalk or talcum powder.
>
> When probing potential cases of food fraud, Elliott told the Canadian
> Press that he looks for certain themes: Has there been crop failures?
> Are there price wars going on in a particular commodity? Currency
> fluctuations are another driving factor (and) political instability and
> corruption.
>
> Aline Dimitri, the deputy chief food safety officer for the Canadian
> Food Inspection Agency said that a monitoring system is in place, which
> examines foods for chemical contamination. We havent really seen any
> major deviations in the system that would make us worry, she told the
> Canadian Press.
>
> Garlic powder has long been maligned for reasons unrelated to food
> fraud. Influential culinary author and teacher James Beard considered
> the product an abomination, writing in Beard on Food (Bloomsbury Press):
> I consider both garlic powder and salt and onion powder and salt to be
> among the more disagreeable of the so-called advances in our eating.
>
> However, if youre hooked on the convenience of the stuff, one way to
> ensure its purity is to make it yourself. A few heads of garlic, a
> dehydrator and a high-speed blender or spice grinder will yield a
> fresher and more potent powder than anything from the store. (Try Joel
> MacCharles recipe for Homemade Smoked Garlic Powder on wellpreserved.ca.)"


It's a strange article. It does not say there's any adulteration of dehydrated garlic going on - only that a professor of from somewhere unknown can't understand where all that garlic is coming from and it worries him. A food safety officer in Canada thinks that there's not a problem. Mostly, there doesn't appear to be any movement on the garlic adulteration scene. Like a lot of "reporting" these days, the article doesn't say much and the readers will see what they want to see. "Rorschach reporting."

Personally, I love the stuff. Unfortunately, I can't find my big container of dehydrated garlic. I made some fried chicken the other day. It was pretty good but some dehydrated garlic would have made it better.

https://www.amazon.com/photos/share/...Ex6e65ng2qShPb

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On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 9:58:42 AM UTC-10, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
> >

> My Kirkland Signature Granulated California Garlic (from Costco) says
> made from 100% California-grown fresh garlic that has been dehydrated
> and milled to size. Love it I always use fresh garlic when I am
> cooking. Sometimes I like a like of garlic on buttered bread or
> something. /Both have their place in my kitchen. Never tried garlic
> powder
> Janet US


It wonderful and cheap. My two favorite things.
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:

>On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>
>>>
>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>
>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>> worry about it in cheap parm.

>>
>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
>>

>
>If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>cheese.


the shelf life is a lot shorter. I got some of that pre-grated fresh
parm once. I opened the container and all inside was held together
with webs of whitish mold. Still within the use by date, but I had
previously opened the container.
Janet US
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On 2017-04-19 9:12 AM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:
>
>> On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>>
>>>>
>>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>>
>>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>>> worry about it in cheap parm.
>>>
>>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
>>>

>>
>> If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>> just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>> cheese.

>
> the shelf life is a lot shorter. I got some of that pre-grated fresh
> parm once. I opened the container and all inside was held together
> with webs of whitish mold. Still within the use by date, but I had
> previously opened the container.
> Janet US
>

My local S/M has an excellent cheese counter and sells Parmigiano
Reggiano in pieces or grated. I occasionally by some of the latter and
store it in the freezer.
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 07:07:05 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
> wrote:

>On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 7:02:07 AM UTC-4, Bruce wrote:
>> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 03:41:44 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 4:46:19 PM UTC-4, Bruce wrote:
>> >> On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:15:44 -0700 (PDT), wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >i won't buy that Parmesan cheese anymore, the kind you can sprinkle...
>> >> >
>> >> >because there's some kind of filler in most [or all] of them
>> >> >
>> >> >some have wood or sawdust?!
>> >>
>> >> Doesn't it say in the ingredients?
>> >
>> >Yes. We have a tube of it because my husband likes it on eggs
>> >once in a while. (We also use the real thing.)
>> >
>> >Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>> >cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>> >caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>> >
>> >There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>> >worry about it in cheap parm.

>>
>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.

>
>Fair enough. Everybody has their own standards. Mine (on the
>subject of Kraft parmesan cheese) is: I'd rather use
>Parmagiano-Reggiano for nearly everything, but once in while
>it's indispensable for that taste of my childhood.
>
>Cindy Hamilton


for me, it is like having real garlic bulbs in my kitchen as well as
granulated garlic. Fresh is best but I have uses for the other as
well.
Janet US


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"dsi1" wrote in message
...


It's a strange article. It does not say there's any adulteration of
dehydrated garlic going on - only that a professor of from somewhere unknown
can't understand where all that garlic is coming from and it worries him. A
food safety officer in Canada thinks that there's not a problem. Mostly,
there doesn't appear to be any movement on the garlic adulteration scene.
Like a lot of "reporting" these days, the article doesn't say much and the
readers will see what they want to see. "Rorschach reporting."

Personally, I love the stuff. Unfortunately, I can't find my big container
of dehydrated garlic. I made some fried chicken the other day. It was pretty
good but some dehydrated garlic would have made it better.

https://www.amazon.com/photos/share/...Ex6e65ng2qShPb

==

That looks good What is that on the plate next to it?

I don't use much fresh garlic. D says he doesn't like garlic, but I can get
away with it if I have processed it I usually dehydrate it oh yes and I
got some garlic paste last year (bought). When I can, I intend to have a go
as making my own.

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 5:24:29 AM UTC-10, Ophelia wrote:
> "dsi1" wrote in message
> ...
>
>
> It's a strange article. It does not say there's any adulteration of
> dehydrated garlic going on - only that a professor of from somewhere unknown
> can't understand where all that garlic is coming from and it worries him. A
> food safety officer in Canada thinks that there's not a problem. Mostly,
> there doesn't appear to be any movement on the garlic adulteration scene.
> Like a lot of "reporting" these days, the article doesn't say much and the
> readers will see what they want to see. "Rorschach reporting."
>
> Personally, I love the stuff. Unfortunately, I can't find my big container
> of dehydrated garlic. I made some fried chicken the other day. It was pretty
> good but some dehydrated garlic would have made it better.
>
> https://www.amazon.com/photos/share/...Ex6e65ng2qShPb
>
> ==
>
> That looks good What is that on the plate next to it?
>
> I don't use much fresh garlic. D says he doesn't like garlic, but I can get
> away with it if I have processed it I usually dehydrate it oh yes and I
> got some garlic paste last year (bought). When I can, I intend to have a go
> as making my own.
>
> --
> http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk


That's chicken frying in the pan. The chicken pieces were large so I could only fit 4 to 5 pieces in the big pan. The coating is simply flour and seasonings - in this case, salt and pepper. Dehydrated garlic would have worked in the flour mix.
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On 4/19/2017 11:12 AM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:
>
>> On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>>
>>>>
>>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>>
>>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>>> worry about it in cheap parm.
>>>
>>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
>>>

>>
>> If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>> just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>> cheese.

>
> the shelf life is a lot shorter. I got some of that pre-grated fresh
> parm once. I opened the container and all inside was held together
> with webs of whitish mold. Still within the use by date, but I had
> previously opened the container.
> Janet US
>

I store the fresh pre-grated parm in the freezer. It comes in a tub.
Sometimes all you need is a sprinkling or maybe a half a container. It
freezes very well. Most hard cheeses do.

Jill
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"dsi1" wrote in message
...

On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 5:24:29 AM UTC-10, Ophelia wrote:
> "dsi1" wrote in message
> ...
>
>
> It's a strange article. It does not say there's any adulteration of
> dehydrated garlic going on - only that a professor of from somewhere
> unknown
> can't understand where all that garlic is coming from and it worries him.
> A
> food safety officer in Canada thinks that there's not a problem. Mostly,
> there doesn't appear to be any movement on the garlic adulteration scene.
> Like a lot of "reporting" these days, the article doesn't say much and the
> readers will see what they want to see. "Rorschach reporting."
>
> Personally, I love the stuff. Unfortunately, I can't find my big container
> of dehydrated garlic. I made some fried chicken the other day. It was
> pretty
> good but some dehydrated garlic would have made it better.
>
> https://www.amazon.com/photos/share/...Ex6e65ng2qShPb
>
> ==
>
> That looks good What is that on the plate next to it?
>
> I don't use much fresh garlic. D says he doesn't like garlic, but I can
> get
> away with it if I have processed it I usually dehydrate it oh yes and I
> got some garlic paste last year (bought). When I can, I intend to have a
> go
> as making my own.
>
> --
> http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk


That's chicken frying in the pan. The chicken pieces were large so I could
only fit 4 to 5 pieces in the big pan. The coating is simply flour and
seasonings - in this case, salt and pepper. Dehydrated garlic would have
worked in the flour mix.

==

Ahhh that is uncooked chicken next to the cooked? Heh I see it now)





--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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Some people that have pica eat chalk.


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On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 3:42:32 PM UTC-4, graham wrote:
> I agree with James Beard that garlic and onion powders are an
> abomination and never use them but some do.
> http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/th...193/story.html
>
> "Turmeric cut with corn, nutmeg diluted with pepper and dried oregano
> adulterated with other plant matter. Dried spices in particular are
> among the most fraudulent foods. Now, a leading food fraud expert is
> warning that the garlic powder being sold in grocery stores, including
> those in Canada could be tainted.
>
> Prof. Christopher Elliott is making his concerns public after
> considering two recent trends: garlic sales remaining steady despite bad
> weather in China killing a significant number of crops. Wheres all the
> garlic coming from? the director of the Institute for Global Food
> Security at Queens University Belfast asked the Canadian Press.
>
> As China produces much of the worlds garlic, Elliott and other
> researchers are currently investigating supply chains for evidence of
> adulteration with substances such as chalk or talcum powder.
>
> When probing potential cases of food fraud, Elliott told the Canadian
> Press that he looks for certain themes: Has there been crop failures?
> Are there price wars going on in a particular commodity? Currency
> fluctuations are another driving factor (and) political instability and
> corruption.
>
> Aline Dimitri, the deputy chief food safety officer for the Canadian
> Food Inspection Agency said that a monitoring system is in place, which
> examines foods for chemical contamination. We havent really seen any
> major deviations in the system that would make us worry, she told the
> Canadian Press.
>
> Garlic powder has long been maligned for reasons unrelated to food
> fraud. Influential culinary author and teacher James Beard considered
> the product an abomination, writing in Beard on Food (Bloomsbury Press):
> I consider both garlic powder and salt and onion powder and salt to be
> among the more disagreeable of the so-called advances in our eating.
>
> However, if youre hooked on the convenience of the stuff, one way to
> ensure its purity is to make it yourself. A few heads of garlic, a
> dehydrator and a high-speed blender or spice grinder will yield a
> fresher and more potent powder than anything from the store. (Try Joel
> MacCharles recipe for Homemade Smoked Garlic Powder on wellpreserved.ca.)"





I'd like to have some old fashioned chalk for my turkey call.
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"U.S. Janet B." > wrote in message
...

> for me, it is like having real garlic bulbs in my kitchen as well as
> granulated garlic. Fresh is best but I have uses for the other as
> well.
> Janet US


Same here.

Cheri


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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 07:06:08 -0700, "Cheri" >
wrote:

> wrote in message
.. .
>> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:
>>
>>>On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>>>
>>>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>>>> worry about it in cheap parm.
>>>>
>>>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>>>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
>>>
>>>If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>>>just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>>>cheese.

>>
>> Most any store that sells hard cheese will grate a wedge for you.... I
>> won't buy pregrated mystery cheese same as I won't buy preground
>> mystery meat. I buy a wedge of hard cheese and grate it at home as
>> needed... my box grater does a good job of grating or shaving.

>
>The food processor does a really good job of grating hard cheese too.


I'm sure it does but I wouldn't want to dirty a whole machine for a
small amount of anything, I prefer to grate just what I want over the
dish, I don't want the entire wedge grated all at once or I would have
had the store do it.
Many Italian restaurants and pizzarias put out pre grated cheese, very
often bought in bulk, the same grated cheese in those little green
cans. A good Italian restaurant will grate/shave cheese from a wedge
right before your eyes. For just me I have a small paddle grater, for
shaved I use my spud peeler.
I have a grater similar to this, does well grating frozen ginger too.
I don't like the results from grating any food with a microplane,
looks and feels like Ivory Snow. I bought a microplane from Lee
Valley years ago for food use, I didn't like the look of Ivory Snow on
my pasta so it now lives in a bathroom vanity drawer, excellent for
removing foot calluses, used regularly makes feet smooth as a baby's.
After showering I give my feet a few licks with the microplane and
then apply a light coat of Blue Goo (emu oil & beeswax) good for
working hands too. The microplane is good for triming toenails, does
a neater smoother job than clippers or scissors, and no blood drawn.
Walmart has the best price, I still have a half dozen from when it was
sold in tins, I buy several when I see it, often it's sold out... read
the reviews:
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Blue-Goo-...-2-oz/15250013


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> wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 07:06:08 -0700, "Cheri" >


>>The food processor does a really good job of grating hard cheese too.

>
> I'm sure it does but I wouldn't want to dirty a whole machine for a
> small amount of anything, I prefer to grate just what I want over the
> dish, I don't want the entire wedge grated all at once or I would have
> had the store do it.


Sure if you're just doing a small amount, but when a recipe calls for a cup
or more, then it would be worth it to me since I have a problem with my
hands at times.

Cheri

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When there's a lot of text above what I post it's not my fault, google groups does it.


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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:38:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski > wrote:

>On 4/19/2017 7:01 AM, Bruce wrote:
>
>>>
>>> Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>>> cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>>> caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>>>
>>> There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>>> worry about it in cheap parm.

>>
>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.
>>

>
>If it can be made without additives, it should be. Anything else is
>just a shortcut or a way of making more money. You can buy pure grated
>cheese.


Yes, I'd rather do that.
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 07:07:05 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
> wrote:

>On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 7:02:07 AM UTC-4, Bruce wrote:
>> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 03:41:44 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 4:46:19 PM UTC-4, Bruce wrote:


>> >>
>> >> Doesn't it say in the ingredients?
>> >
>> >Yes. We have a tube of it because my husband likes it on eggs
>> >once in a while. (We also use the real thing.)
>> >
>> >Ingredients: Parmesan cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk,
>> >cheese culture, salt, enzymes), cellulose powder to prevent
>> >caking, potassium sorbate to protect flavor
>> >
>> >There's cellulose in every plant that we eat. I just can't
>> >worry about it in cheap parm.

>>
>> I hate these additions, whether they're bad for us or not. If they
>> can't make a product without added nonsense, I'd rather not use it.

>
>Fair enough. Everybody has their own standards. Mine (on the
>subject of Kraft parmesan cheese) is: I'd rather use
>Parmagiano-Reggiano for nearly everything, but once in while
>it's indispensable for that taste of my childhood.


And when you don't have any time, prefab food can be a life saver. I'm
not fanatical about it, but I do try to avoid adulterated stuff.
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 07:58:54 -0700 (PDT), dsi1 >
wrote:

>On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 9:58:42 AM UTC-10, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
>> >

>> My Kirkland Signature Granulated California Garlic (from Costco) says
>> made from 100% California-grown fresh garlic that has been dehydrated
>> and milled to size. Love it I always use fresh garlic when I am
>> cooking. Sometimes I like a like of garlic on buttered bread or
>> something. /Both have their place in my kitchen. Never tried garlic
>> powder
>> Janet US

>
>It wonderful and cheap. My two favorite things.


Garlic cheap? Maybe Chinese "garlic".
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 16:23:27 +0100, "Ophelia" >
wrote:

>"dsi1" wrote in message
...
>
>
>It's a strange article. It does not say there's any adulteration of
>dehydrated garlic going on - only that a professor of from somewhere unknown
>can't understand where all that garlic is coming from and it worries him. A
>food safety officer in Canada thinks that there's not a problem. Mostly,
>there doesn't appear to be any movement on the garlic adulteration scene.
>Like a lot of "reporting" these days, the article doesn't say much and the
>readers will see what they want to see. "Rorschach reporting."
>
>Personally, I love the stuff. Unfortunately, I can't find my big container
>of dehydrated garlic. I made some fried chicken the other day. It was pretty
>good but some dehydrated garlic would have made it better.
>
>https://www.amazon.com/photos/share/...Ex6e65ng2qShPb
>
>==
>
>That looks good What is that on the plate next to it?
>
>I don't use much fresh garlic. D says he doesn't like garlic


Of course he doesn't.
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