General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/15/2017 1:55 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> IME, home remedies are often only moderately acceptable or not
> acceptable at all, e.g., using mayo, salad oil, butter, peanut butter,
> etc. in order to remove labels. I'd sooner have a proper solvent or
> remover on hand and get the job done quickly. Thre are many other
> categories of home remedies that are also only partially effective or
> not at all.
>

Guess what "home remedy" works really well to remove tarnish from
silver? Baking soda, white vinegar and foil. Don't ask me why; I'm not
a chemist.

I hear tell ketchup is also good for cleaning silver. Since I don't use
ketchup for much (not even on fried potatoes!) it might be a good way to
use up what I've got in the 'fridge.

Jill
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,238
Default Home Remedies

I don't think the home fix for cleaning silver is recommended by anyone who
knows silver....I guess it removes too much of the silver, but I don't know exactly
why it is a bad idea.

N.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,618
Default Home Remedies

On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 15:34:17 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> wrote:

>I don't think the home fix for cleaning silver is recommended by anyone who
>knows silver....I guess it removes too much of the silver, but I don't know exactly
>why it is a bad idea.
>
>N.

If you have silver plate soon the finish is gone and you have black
ware.
Janet US
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 398
Default Home Remedies

Am Mittwoch, 19. April 2017 00:34:22 UTC+2 schrieb Nancy2:
> I don't think the home fix for cleaning silver is recommended by anyone who
> knows silver....I guess it removes too much of the silver, but I don't know exactly
> why it is a bad idea.
>
> N.


On the contrary - the black stuff you rub off with cleaning paste is oxidized
silver. The home remedy with baking soda, aluminium foil etc. turns it back
into silver.

Bye, Sanne.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 398
Default Home Remedies

Am Mittwoch, 19. April 2017 01:00:50 UTC+2 schrieb U.S. Janet B.:
> On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 15:34:17 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> > wrote:
>
> >I don't think the home fix for cleaning silver is recommended by anyone who
> >knows silver....I guess it removes too much of the silver, but I don't know exactly
> >why it is a bad idea.
> >
> >N.

> If you have silver plate soon the finish is gone and you have black
> ware.
> Janet US


See my former reply.

Bye, Sanne.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,238
Default Home Remedies

Sorry, Sanne...check with your favorite silver expert, not a home remedy expert.

N.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,618
Default Home Remedies

On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:41:08 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> wrote:

>Sorry, Sanne...check with your favorite silver expert, not a home remedy expert.
>
>N.


I checked, he's correct.
The rubbing polish takes away silver. The soaking in the home made
liquid (I found it under the University of Wisconsin) changes the
chemical structure back to silver.
Janet
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/19/2017 12:53 PM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:41:08 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> > wrote:
>
>> Sorry, Sanne...check with your favorite silver expert, not a home remedy expert.
>>
>> N.

>
> I checked, he's correct.
> The rubbing polish takes away silver. The soaking in the home made
> liquid (I found it under the University of Wisconsin) changes the
> chemical structure back to silver.
> Janet
>

Yes, sanne is correct. I've used this method to clean sterling silver.
I don't know *how* it works, but it doesn't strip tarnish like
commercial polishes do. A jeweler friend told me about this method a
couple of decades ago.

I've tried it. I have a sterling silverware set. Lots of silver
jewelry. Silver tarnishes rather quickly if not constantly used,
washed, handled.

I've tried this method and it works.* It won't come out looking like
you had a servant(s) who spent all day polishing the silver, but hey...
it's not looking black. Give it a good soak, and do it in batches.
Tarnished silverware is a bitch to keep clean.

*Note: If you use this method to clean silver jewelry, if there are
stones in the setting make sure they are *hard* gemstones.

Jill
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,607
Default Home Remedies

U.S. Janet B. wrote:
>Nancy2 wrote:
>
>>Sorry, Sanne...check with your favorite silver expert, not a home remedy expert.

>
>I checked, he's correct.
>The rubbing polish takes away silver. The soaking in the home made
>liquid (I found it under the University of Wisconsin) changes the
>chemical structure back to silver.


True... any form of polishing removes metal by abrasion. That
homemade solution works faster in an ultrasonic cleaner... the
aluminum foil causes the tarnish to redeposit by electrolytic action.
However that solution won't remove scratches and may produce a matte
finish that will require careful polishing with jeweler's rouge.
Whenever trying a new application on precious metal it's wise to run a
test on a piece you don't care about.
The darkened areas on old x-ray film is silver oxide, there are
companies that reclaim that silver, however most x-rays are now
digital, no film.... no more light boxes, now digitized x-rays are
displayed in HD on large screen monitors.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23,520
Default Home Remedies

On 4/19/2017 6:09 AM, sanne wrote:
> Am Mittwoch, 19. April 2017 00:34:22 UTC+2 schrieb Nancy2:
>> I don't think the home fix for cleaning silver is recommended by anyone who
>> knows silver....I guess it removes too much of the silver, but I don't know exactly
>> why it is a bad idea.
>>
>> N.

>
> On the contrary - the black stuff you rub off with cleaning paste is oxidized
> silver. The home remedy with baking soda, aluminium foil etc. turns it back
> into silver.



If you have real silver, why take a chance of some home remedy.
Just buy the good stuff for god sake. It cost very little considering
how often you polish your silver.

I've always used Wright's Silver polish. It lasts forever.
If you have nice silver, no need to be a tightwad just for the
occasional cleaning.








  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,279
Default Home Remedies

On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 10:53:18 -0600, U.S. Janet B. >
wrote:

>On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:41:08 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> wrote:
>
>>Sorry, Sanne...check with your favorite silver expert, not a home remedy expert.
>>
>>N.

>
>I checked, he's correct.


She, most likely.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,607
Default Home Remedies

On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 16:04:39 -0400, Gary > wrote:

>On 4/19/2017 6:09 AM, sanne wrote:
>> Am Mittwoch, 19. April 2017 00:34:22 UTC+2 schrieb Nancy2:
>>> I don't think the home fix for cleaning silver is recommended by anyone who
>>> knows silver....I guess it removes too much of the silver, but I don't know exactly
>>> why it is a bad idea.
>>>
>>> N.

>>
>> On the contrary - the black stuff you rub off with cleaning paste is oxidized
>> silver. The home remedy with baking soda, aluminium foil etc. turns it back
>> into silver.

>
>
>If you have real silver, why take a chance of some home remedy.
>Just buy the good stuff for god sake. It cost very little considering
>how often you polish your silver.
>
>I've always used Wright's Silver polish. It lasts forever.
>If you have nice silver, no need to be a tightwad just for the
>occasional cleaning.


Nothing to do with cost, has to do with polishes removing metal via
abrasion.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 398
Default Home Remedies

Am Mittwoch, 19. April 2017 22:11:38 UTC+2 schrieb Bruce:
> On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 10:53:18 -0600, U.S. Janet B. >
> wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:41:08 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> > wrote:
> >
> >>Sorry, Sanne...check with your favorite silver expert, not a home remedy expert.
> >>
> >>N.

> >
> >I checked, he's correct.

>
> She, most likely.


Yes indeed. :-)

I used that method the first time over 40 years ago, it was in a book for
all kinds of experiments. Yes, my mother trusted me with that! ;-)

The recipe there was 1 tbsp baking powder and 1 tsp plain salt on 1 quart
boiling water.
Place the silverware in an aluminium pot that each piece has direct contact
to the pot. Cover with the mentioned mixture. Let stand for a few minutes.
Rinse the silver well.

The down point is: It stinks since the black stuff is a sulfur compound...

And - as Jill has mentioned before - be very careful with jewelry; there
are aluminium compounds that would get severely damaged!

Bye, Sanne.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,238
Default Home Remedies

I use Wright's, too...I don't use my sterling often because I don't entertain like I did in
the old days. I would rather use my heavy stainless flatware for everyday.

I have a large number of sterling and plated serving pieces. Now that I don't use that
at all, it is polished, wrapped in silver cloth, and then put into those large vacuum bags
that you can remove all the air from.
I dare it to get tarnished. Lol.


N.
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,618
Default Home Remedies

On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 05:35:26 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> wrote:

>I use Wright's, too...I don't use my sterling often because I don't entertain like I did in
>the old days. I would rather use my heavy stainless flatware for everyday.
>
>I have a large number of sterling and plated serving pieces. Now that I don't use that
>at all, it is polished, wrapped in silver cloth, and then put into those large vacuum bags
>that you can remove all the air from.
>I dare it to get tarnished. Lol.
>
>
>N.

That stuff doesn't even have value at a yard sale. I couldn't even
give mine away. It just isn't the lifestyle anymore.
Janet US
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/20/2017 8:35 AM, Nancy2 wrote:
> I use Wright's, too...I don't use my sterling often because I don't entertain like I did in
> the old days. I would rather use my heavy stainless flatware for everyday.
>
> I have a large number of sterling and plated serving pieces. Now that I don't use that
> at all, it is polished, wrapped in silver cloth, and then put into those large vacuum bags
> that you can remove all the air from.
> I dare it to get tarnished. Lol.
>
>
> N.
>

Nancy2, I'd sell my sterling silverware except I can't think who to sell
it *to*. I don't use it. My mother only used it on holidays. I don't
know anyone who uses sterling silverware anymore. I wouldn't begin to
know how to price it, either. It's a set in a box with all the
necessary and (to me) unnecessary (i.e pickle forks) serving pieces.
Old stuff... more on this in a new post.

Jill
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/20/2017 11:36 AM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
> On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 05:35:26 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
> > wrote:
>
>> I use Wright's, too...I don't use my sterling often because I don't entertain like I did in
>> the old days. I would rather use my heavy stainless flatware for everyday.
>>
>> I have a large number of sterling and plated serving pieces. Now that I don't use that
>> at all, it is polished, wrapped in silver cloth, and then put into those large vacuum bags
>> that you can remove all the air from.
>> I dare it to get tarnished. Lol.
>>
>>
>> N.

> That stuff doesn't even have value at a yard sale. I couldn't even
> give mine away. It just isn't the lifestyle anymore.
> Janet US
>

It definitely isn't the lifestyle anymore. I'm not sure it was even the
"lifestyle" when my mother got her sterling silverware. At least not
for long. I just posted some pics of my sterling in a new thread. It
also addresses possibly why the silver isn't tarnished.

Jill

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,607
Default Home Remedies

On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:46:40 -0400, jmcquown >
wrote:

>On 4/20/2017 8:35 AM, Nancy2 wrote:
>> I use Wright's, too...I don't use my sterling often because I don't entertain like I did in
>> the old days. I would rather use my heavy stainless flatware for everyday.
>>
>> I have a large number of sterling and plated serving pieces. Now that I don't use that
>> at all, it is polished, wrapped in silver cloth, and then put into those large vacuum bags
>> that you can remove all the air from.
>> I dare it to get tarnished. Lol.
>>
>>
>> N.
>>

>Nancy2, I'd sell my sterling silverware except I can't think who to sell
>it *to*. I don't use it. My mother only used it on holidays. I don't
>know anyone who uses sterling silverware anymore. I wouldn't begin to
>know how to price it, either. It's a set in a box with all the
>necessary and (to me) unnecessary (i.e pickle forks) serving pieces.
>Old stuff... more on this in a new post.
>
>Jill


You should be able to get a good idea of its value by searching for
the same to buy on line.
  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,238
Default Home Remedies

Jill, contact Replacements, Ltd. at their website. Tell them what you have and
ask them for an offer. That is the only place I know which buys silver, China,
and stainless.

N.
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/21/2017 8:47 AM, Nancy2 wrote:
> Jill, contact Replacements, Ltd. at their website. Tell them what you have and
> ask them for an offer. That is the only place I know which buys silver, China,
> and stainless.
>
> N.
>

They can't really do it sight unseen or from photos. Sorry, I am not
planning a trip to North Carolina. But thanks.

Jill
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,851
Default Home Remedies

On 4/21/2017 4:45 PM, jmcquown wrote:

>
> I just finished filling out the form they emailed me. Reading the fine
> print: we normally purchase up to two of any single place setting piece,
> and only one of any single service piece. What?
>
> Checked on what they'd offer me for each piece. Hey, $1138 doesn't
> sound bad. Of course I have to pay to ship it to them but it is
> certainly something to consider.
>
> Jill


Not bad. That will keep you in beer for a couple of days. Better than
sitting in a drawer.
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/21/2017 6:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
> On 4/21/2017 4:45 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>
>>
>> I just finished filling out the form they emailed me. Reading the
>> fine print: we normally purchase up to two of any single place setting
>> piece, and only one of any single service piece. What?
>>
>> Checked on what they'd offer me for each piece. Hey, $1138 doesn't
>> sound bad. Of course I have to pay to ship it to them but it is
>> certainly something to consider.
>>
>> Jill

>
> Not bad. That will keep you in beer for a couple of days. Better than
> sitting in a drawer.


Too bad I don't drink beer. Definitely better than sitting in a drawer.

The one thing the woman at Replacements said when we spoke said was
"Don't send it in the wooden box! We have tons of wooden silverware
boxes." Uh, that would leave me with an empty wooden silverware box.
What the heck am I supposed to do with that?! (rhetorical question)

She offered no suggestions about how I'm supposed to ship over 100
individual pieces of silverware unless they're safely nestled in the
box. I also have to agree if they are deemed by Replacements to be less
than MINT, I will accept (select one): (A) 1/2 offered price (B) 3/4
offered price or (C) Offered Price Only.

If they refuse to buy the silverware, I have to pay for them to return
it to me.

So yes, I'm still going to take it to be appraised locally.

Jill
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,607
Default Home Remedies

On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 22:57:11 -0400, jmcquown >
wrote:

>On 4/21/2017 6:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
>> On 4/21/2017 4:45 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> I just finished filling out the form they emailed me. Reading the
>>> fine print: we normally purchase up to two of any single place setting
>>> piece, and only one of any single service piece. What?
>>>
>>> Checked on what they'd offer me for each piece. Hey, $1138 doesn't
>>> sound bad. Of course I have to pay to ship it to them but it is
>>> certainly something to consider.
>>>
>>> Jill

>>
>> Not bad. That will keep you in beer for a couple of days. Better than
>> sitting in a drawer.

>
>Too bad I don't drink beer. Definitely better than sitting in a drawer.
>
>The one thing the woman at Replacements said when we spoke said was
>"Don't send it in the wooden box! We have tons of wooden silverware
>boxes." Uh, that would leave me with an empty wooden silverware box.
>What the heck am I supposed to do with that?! (rhetorical question)
>
>She offered no suggestions about how I'm supposed to ship over 100
>individual pieces of silverware unless they're safely nestled in the
>box. I also have to agree if they are deemed by Replacements to be less
>than MINT, I will accept (select one): (A) 1/2 offered price (B) 3/4
>offered price or (C) Offered Price Only.
>
>If they refuse to buy the silverware, I have to pay for them to return
>it to me.
>
>So yes, I'm still going to take it to be appraised locally.
>
>Jill


I'd place it for auction at a local auctioneering house with a minimum
opening price, say $1,500. People do that here all the time and I
enjoy attending auctions. You'd be amazed at how high frenzied
bidders go.
I attend auctions he
http://mooneysauction.com/


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/21/2017 11:34 PM, wrote:
> On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 22:57:11 -0400, jmcquown >
> wrote:
>
>> On 4/21/2017 6:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
>>> On 4/21/2017 4:45 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> I just finished filling out the form they emailed me. Reading the
>>>> fine print: we normally purchase up to two of any single place setting
>>>> piece, and only one of any single service piece. What?
>>>>
>>>> Checked on what they'd offer me for each piece. Hey, $1138 doesn't
>>>> sound bad. Of course I have to pay to ship it to them but it is
>>>> certainly something to consider.
>>>>
>>>> Jill
>>>
>>> Not bad. That will keep you in beer for a couple of days. Better than
>>> sitting in a drawer.

>>
>> Too bad I don't drink beer. Definitely better than sitting in a drawer.
>>
>> The one thing the woman at Replacements said when we spoke said was
>> "Don't send it in the wooden box! We have tons of wooden silverware
>> boxes." Uh, that would leave me with an empty wooden silverware box.
>> What the heck am I supposed to do with that?! (rhetorical question)
>>
>> She offered no suggestions about how I'm supposed to ship over 100
>> individual pieces of silverware unless they're safely nestled in the
>> box. I also have to agree if they are deemed by Replacements to be less
>> than MINT, I will accept (select one): (A) 1/2 offered price (B) 3/4
>> offered price or (C) Offered Price Only.
>>
>> If they refuse to buy the silverware, I have to pay for them to return
>> it to me.
>>
>> So yes, I'm still going to take it to be appraised locally.
>>
>> Jill

>
> I'd place it for auction at a local auctioneering house with a minimum
> opening price, say $1,500. People do that here all the time and I
> enjoy attending auctions. You'd be amazed at how high frenzied
> bidders go.
> I attend auctions he
>
http://mooneysauction.com/
>

I'm sure auctions are fun but they aren't common down here.

Jill
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,238
Default Home Remedies

Jill, wrap each individual piece in a small bit of tissue and for the spoons and forks,
nestle them together and put a piece of small-bubble bubble wrap around the bunch.
Wrap knives and serving pieces the same way. The only thing to do for no damage
during shipping is to keep them from banging around against each other.
Donate the chest to Goodwill or another thrift shop.

N.
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35,884
Default Home Remedies

On 2017-04-21 11:57 PM, jmcquown wrote:
> On 4/21/2017 11:34 PM, wrote:


>>
>> I'd place it for auction at a local auctioneering house with a minimum
>> opening price, say $1,500. People do that here all the time and I
>> enjoy attending auctions. You'd be amazed at how high frenzied
>> bidders go.
>> I attend auctions he
>>
http://mooneysauction.com/
>>

> I'm sure auctions are fun but they aren't common down here.


You might be surprised at how many auctions there are. Like flea markets
and garage sales, most of us are not much interested, but there are a
lot of people who live for them. Any area with a large population of
retirees is likely to have a number of businesses that deal in estate
auctions.





  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/22/2017 9:11 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
> On 2017-04-21 11:57 PM, jmcquown wrote:
>> On 4/21/2017 11:34 PM, wrote:

>
>>>
>>> I'd place it for auction at a local auctioneering house with a minimum
>>> opening price, say $1,500. People do that here all the time and I
>>> enjoy attending auctions. You'd be amazed at how high frenzied
>>> bidders go.
>>> I attend auctions he
>>>
http://mooneysauction.com/
>>>

>> I'm sure auctions are fun but they aren't common down here.

>
> You might be surprised at how many auctions there are. Like flea markets
> and garage sales, most of us are not much interested, but there are a
> lot of people who live for them. Any area with a large population of
> retirees is likely to have a number of businesses that deal in estate
> auctions.
>

I've checked. There are consignment shops that handle "estate" items in
Beaufort, but they don't hold actual auctions where people bid on things.

Jill
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23,520
Default Home Remedies

On 4/22/2017 8:49 AM, Nancy2 wrote:
> Jill, wrap each individual piece in a small bit of tissue and for the spoons and forks,
> nestle them together and put a piece of small-bubble bubble wrap around the bunch.
> Wrap knives and serving pieces the same way. The only thing to do for no damage
> during shipping is to keep them from banging around against each other.
> Donate the chest to Goodwill or another thrift shop.
>
> N.


After hearing Jill's story about that place, I wouldn't deal with them.
I'd do local. Try Craigslist or even an auction with a minimum starting
price.

Also don't expect full value, just accept a decent amount. Better some
money in the bank than silverware in a drawer unused year after year.

My daughter had a full set of silverware. Don't know if she still has it
but she doesn't need that old-school fancy. Hers was from "Reed and
Barton" and the pattern was ."Hampton Court." It was minimal fancy and
not overly ornate. Original price was approx. $250 per 5 place setting.

Me: I still use my nice grocery store ware. I do have a fancy stainless
set made by Oneida. It has a mild seafood pattern. I like it but I
almost never use it. Mine sits in a dusty box and only gets used once or
twice a year. I should sell mine to someone that might actually enjoy
it and use it every day, not just.....






  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36,804
Default Home Remedies

On 4/22/2017 11:30 AM, Gary wrote:
> On 4/22/2017 8:49 AM, Nancy2 wrote:
>> Jill, wrap each individual piece in a small bit of tissue and for the
>> spoons and forks,
>> nestle them together and put a piece of small-bubble bubble wrap
>> around the bunch.
>> Wrap knives and serving pieces the same way. The only thing to do for
>> no damage
>> during shipping is to keep them from banging around against each other.
>> Donate the chest to Goodwill or another thrift shop.
>>
>> N.

>
> After hearing Jill's story about that place, I wouldn't deal with them.
> I'd do local. Try Craigslist or even an auction with a minimum starting
> price.
>

It would be a PITA to wrap (I counted) 107 pieces and then buy paper or
bubble wrap. They did make me a prospective offer $1139, but have the
option to refuse the items. Then I have to pay to have them send it
back if they don't buy it.

> Also don't expect full value, just accept a decent amount. Better some
> money in the bank than silverware in a drawer unused year after year.
>

The value is subjective, anyway. What the market will bear. People
just don't use silverware like they used to.

> My daughter had a full set of silverware. Don't know if she still has it
> but she doesn't need that old-school fancy. Hers was from "Reed and
> Barton" and the pattern was ."Hampton Court." It was minimal fancy and
> not overly ornate. Original price was approx. $250 per 5 place setting.
>

Easy enough to look up, Gary.

https://www.silverqueen.com/Product-...AMPTON%20COURT

Oh, they have pieces of that on replacements.com, too.

> Me: I still use my nice grocery store ware. I do have a fancy stainless
> set made by Oneida. It has a mild seafood pattern. I like it but I
> almost never use it. Mine sits in a dusty box and only gets used once or
> twice a year. I should sell mine to someone that might actually enjoy
> it and use it every day, not just.....
>

I bought my stainless flatware at JCP. Been using it for decades. I
don't use the *silver*.

Jill
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,238
Default Home Remedies

Jill, it goes faster than you think, and a small bit of bubble wrap inside a single small
(wouldn't even need to be as big as a book carton...) would cost a negligible amount.

Go for it, that's my advice. But in the end, I'm sure you will do as you like. ;-))

N.
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
home remedies for sore throat Gus[_3_] General Cooking 21 12-07-2014 08:36 AM
Wed Funny: Simple home remedies PeterL General Cooking 0 13-02-2007 10:51 PM
OT naturally - home remedies for an earache? AlleyGator General Cooking 18 26-03-2005 08:59 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:27 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"