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Old 25-01-2016, 09:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/

--
Bob
The joint that time is out of
www.kanyak.com

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Old 25-01-2016, 01:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

nancy

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Old 25-01-2016, 02:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

Nancy Young wrote:

On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.



Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)

I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing very "subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for your money...all grocery stores do this to some extent.

Anyways, I went in looking for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with something two dollars more...

--
Best
Greg -- "gullible"

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Old 25-01-2016, 03:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On 1/25/2016 9:55 AM, Gregory Morrow wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:

On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.


Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)

I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing very
"subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for

your money...
all grocery stores do this to some extent.


And appliance stores and department stores and ...

Anyways, I went in looking for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with
something two dollars more...


It works! Heh.

nancy

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Old 25-01-2016, 03:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 7:12:07 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:
On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

nancy


It's called marketing! Being sold to! Think for yourself. Some say "think outside the box", I say there in no box!! Retailers are trying to box you in to further their agenda! The only way to win this game is to not play their game!! I always feel like I'm in shackles in a grocery store! Chained to THEIR game!! **** that!! I'll buy what *I* want to buy!! And it's not most of what YOU are selling!!!

John Kuthe...


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Old 25-01-2016, 03:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 8:55:36 AM UTC-6, Gregory Morrow wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:

On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.



Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)

I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing very "subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for your money...all grocery stores do this to some extent.

Anyways, I went in looking for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with something two dollars more...

--
Best
Greg -- "gullible"


They GOT you!! :-(

John Kuthe...
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Old 25-01-2016, 04:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 7:12:07 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:
On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

I can always get a bottle of a good, local Missouri sweet wine for under $8..
I like water better with delicate food, and beer with more robust food.

nancy


--Bryan
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Old 25-01-2016, 04:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Mon, 25 Jan 2016 06:55:24 -0800 (PST), Gregory Morrow
wrote:

Anyways, I went in looking for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with something two dollars more...

If you were looking for a cooking wine, you wasted your money. If you
plan to drink it, you made a wise choice.

--

sf
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Old 25-01-2016, 04:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Mon, 25 Jan 2016 10:04:18 -0500, Nancy Young
wrote:

On 1/25/2016 9:55 AM, Gregory Morrow wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:

On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/

That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.


Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)

I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing very
"subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for

your money...
all grocery stores do this to some extent.


And appliance stores and department stores and ...

Anyways, I went in looking for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with
something two dollars more...


It works! Heh.

Only if people don't know which end is up.

--

sf
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Old 25-01-2016, 04:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 10:12:10 AM UTC-6, MisterDiddyWahDiddy wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 7:12:07 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:
On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

I can always get a bottle of a good, local Missouri sweet wine for under $8.
I like water better with delicate food, and beer with more robust food.

nancy


--Bryan


Sweet wines are for children, not that children should be drinking alcohol!

And water is the BEST beverage!! Mostly what I drink, daily! 1/2 gallon a day, more in warmer months.

John Kuthe...


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Old 25-01-2016, 05:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 10:41:35 AM UTC-6, John Kuthe wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 10:12:10 AM UTC-6, MisterDiddyWahDiddy wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 7:12:07 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:
On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/

That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

I can always get a bottle of a good, local Missouri sweet wine for under $8.
I like water better with delicate food, and beer with more robust food.

nancy


--Bryan


Sweet wines are for children, not that children should be drinking alcohol!

Sweet wines are for long walks through the forest; they're for wine spritzers
on a hot summer day. They go great with fresh fruit, nuts and cheeses.

Yummy. http://www.montelle.com/wine-store/r...house-red.html

And water is the BEST beverage!! Mostly what I drink, daily! 1/2 gallon a day, more in warmer months.

Water doesn't alter the flavor of food.

John Kuthe...


--Bryan
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Old 25-01-2016, 05:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

Gregory Morrow wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:
Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/


That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.


Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)
I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing
very "subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for your
money...all grocery stores do this to some extent. Anyways, I went in looking
for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with something two dollars more...


I would have left with a case of 1.75 L bottles of Crystal Palace
Vodka, $14.99 per with a 10% discount for buying the case of six. I'd
do much better knocking down the alcohol content of vodka to that of
wine with ice and Fresca with a wedge of lemon/lime than drinking
cheap wino swill.
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Old 25-01-2016, 05:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 11:05:11 AM UTC-6, Brooklyn1 wrote:
Gregory Morrow wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:
Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/

That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.


Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)
I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing
very "subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for your
money...all grocery stores do this to some extent. Anyways, I went in looking
for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with something two dollars more...


I would have left with a case of 1.75 L bottles of Crystal Palace
Vodka, $14.99 per with a 10% discount for buying the case of six. I'd
do much better knocking down the alcohol content of vodka to that of
wine with ice and Fresca with a wedge of lemon/lime than drinking
cheap wino swill.


That drink is better with cleaner, and admittedly a bit higher priced
vodka. It's also better with a little fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
(and optionally, a little sweetener) added, but Fresca is a good mixer
for vodka.

--Bryan
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Old 25-01-2016, 05:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 11:04:25 AM UTC-6, MisterDiddyWahDiddy wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 10:41:35 AM UTC-6, John Kuthe wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 10:12:10 AM UTC-6, MisterDiddyWahDiddy wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 7:12:07 AM UTC-6, Nancy Young wrote:
On 1/25/2016 4:33 AM, Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/

That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

I can always get a bottle of a good, local Missouri sweet wine for under $8.
I like water better with delicate food, and beer with more robust food.

nancy

--Bryan


Sweet wines are for children, not that children should be drinking alcohol!

Sweet wines are for long walks through the forest; they're for wine spritzers
on a hot summer day. They go great with fresh fruit, nuts and cheeses.

Yummy. http://www.montelle.com/wine-store/r...house-red.html

And water is the BEST beverage!! Mostly what I drink, daily! 1/2 gallon a day, more in warmer months.

Water doesn't alter the flavor of food.

John Kuthe...


--Bryan


Sweet wines are like what my baking buddy Scott used to call my cream and sugar in my coffee: little girl's coffee! Sweet wines are for little girls too. Sweet wines are made by either adding sugar to the grape juice pre and sometimes even post fermentation!! A "real" wine is made by fermenting the juice until the alcohol content kills the fermentation yeasts, then it is "done"! Or until the fermentation yeasts run out of natural sugars to eat!! Either way, the yeasts die and fermentation stops.

John Kuthe...
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Old 25-01-2016, 05:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "A bottle of your second-cheapest wine, my good man."

MisterDiddyWahDiddy wrote:
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 11:05:11 AM UTC-6, Brooklyn1 wrote:
Gregory Morrow wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:
Opinicus wrote:
Paraphrasing from the recent "Supermarkets: The tricks of the trade"
episode of "Tonight":

A supermarket sells two kinds of wine, one for 3.79 (Brand A) and
another for 4.49 (Brand B), which differ only in quality. On
average, about two-thirds of customers buy Brand A and one-third buy
Brand B. Problem: Increase total turnover without cutting or raising
prices. Solution: Introduce a third and better kind of wine (Brand C)
selling at 9.99. It turns out that even though very few customers
will buy Brand C, about half of those who used to buy Brand A will
shift to Brand B, thereby increasing total turnover.

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-01-21/s...trade-tonight/

That is a tactic that is used for many things, I'm sure there is
a name for it.

Hmmmm...in the bar and resto biz it's sometimes called "upselling"... ;-)
I visited Trader Joe's yesterday, and I noticed that they do this sort of thing
very "subtly" - of course ensuring that you are getting "top value" for your
money...all grocery stores do this to some extent. Anyways, I went in looking
for a bottle of their "$2.99 Chuck", but left with something two dollars more...


I would have left with a case of 1.75 L bottles of Crystal Palace
Vodka, $14.99 per with a 10% discount for buying the case of six. I'd
do much better knocking down the alcohol content of vodka to that of
wine with ice and Fresca with a wedge of lemon/lime than drinking
cheap wino swill.


That drink is better with cleaner, and admittedly a bit higher priced
vodka. It's also better with a little fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
(and optionally, a little sweetener) added, but Fresca is a good mixer
for vodka.

--Bryan



Wow, alky advice...


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