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Old 09-11-2015, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

I just moved in with my bf thousands of miles away from my mothers house. When I looked in his fridge I almost had a heart attack. All that was in it were basic condiments, and two cartons of expired almond milk! His freezer had two big bags of Birdseye(ugh) Thai stir fry, and some hamburger meat (only like chicken, bacon, and occasionally ground beef in tacos). D:


That's it! No cheese, fresh veggies, eggs, or bacon. The only spice he has is salt!!!!! I always had a fridge full of food, and cabinet of basic spices. Even then I would sometimes feel like I had "nothing to eat". Man how ungrateful I was.

Money is really tight. I'm unemployed, plus he just bought my ticket to arrive. He had to fix his car and is a few hundred dollars


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Old 09-11-2015, 08:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options than beans and ramen. I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the first time this year). Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Thanks a lot. I enjoy reading what's on your plate. Maybe one day I can cook like you guys


BTW we have Walmart and Safeway near us, along with a few other places.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

wrote in rec.food.cooking:

in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options
than beans and ramen. I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs
for the first time this year). Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen,
and fast food.


Thanks a lot. I enjoy reading what's on your plate. Maybe one day I
can cook like you guys


BTW we have Walmart and Safeway near us, along with a few other
places.


Hi,

*If* you have a crockpot, your chances just expanded on savings but if
not, you need cheap eats for now.

The least expensive beans are dried and made in a crockpot. It costs
almost no electricity to do it that way. Next cheapest is dry beans
boiled for 10 minutes then set with a tight lid overnight on the stove,
then set to a brisk simmer for another hour the next day (type varoes
on how long they take).

Canned beans are not a bad deal. Look for sales. Generally you should
be able to get them for no more than 75cents a can.

There are a lot of things that are simple to start with. Baking a
whole chicken for example is really easy.

I set up some basics that do not need anything fancy and are much
cheaper to make from scratch yet are not hard to do.



Here's a basic suitable for 2. You may want to double the meat if you
can afford it.


MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

Title: Campbell's No-Guilt Chicken Pot Pie
Categories: Chicken
Yield: 4 Servings

1 cn Campbell's Cond. 98% Free
-Cream of Chicken
1 pk Frozen mixed vegetables; 9
-oz
1 c Cubed cooked chicken
1/2 c Milk
1 Egg
1 c Bisquick reduced fat baking
-mix

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In 9" pie plate, mix soup, vegetables
and chicken.

2. Mix milk, egg, and baking mix. Pour over chicken mixture. Bake 30
minutes or until crust is golden.

Recipe by: Campbell Soup Company

Posted to MC-Recipe Digest V1 #999 by "
on Jan 10, 1998

MMMMM

For the cup cubed chicken, you can use 2 cans. Or you bake a whole
chicken (1.50lb or less for them generally) and save off some for this
for the next night.


MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

Title: Chili (Crockpot)
Categories: Chili, Beef, Crockpot
Yield: 8 Servings

3 One pound cans kidney beans
-drained
2 One pound cans tomatoes -
-cut up
2 lb Ground beef browned and
-drained
2 md Onions coarsely chopped
1 c Diced celery
1 Glove minced garlic
4 -6 tablespoons chili
-powder
1 ts Cumin
-salt and pepper to taste

Put all ingredients in Crockpot in order listed. Stir once.

Cover and cook on Low for 10 12 hours or High 5 - 6 hours. ==
Courtesy of Dale & Gail Shipp, Columbia Md. ==

Converted by MMCONV vers. 1.50 From: Joan Mershon Date: Sun, 01-1

From Gemini's MASSIVE MealMaster collection at
www.synapse.com/~gemini

MMMMM

MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

Title: Cheese and Potato Casserole
Categories: Crockpot, Vegetables, Casserole
Yield: 1 Servings

2 lb Pkg. frozen hash brown
-potatoes; partially thawed
2 cn (10 oz.) cheddar cheese soup
1 cn (13 oz.) evaporated milk
1 cn French fried onion rings;
-divided
Salt And Pepper; to taste

Combine potatoes, soup, milk, and half the can of onion rings; pour
into greased crockpot and add salt and pepper. Cover and cook on low
for 8 to 9 hours or high for 4 hours. Sprinkle the rest of the onion
rings of top before serving. Posted to recipelu-digest Volume 01
Number 405 by James and Susan Kirkland on Dec 27,
1997

MMMMM

That can be adapted to a cassarole in the oven, it would be 350F for
about 1 hour.


MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

Title: Crock-Pot Baked Potatoes
Categories: Crockpot, Potatoes
Yield: 1 Servings

Potatoes -- use 6-12 of
Them

Prick pots with fork. Wrap them in foil. Fill Crock-Pot with 6 to 12
potatoes. Cover. Go away. Cook on Low 8 to 10 hours (High: 2 1/2
to 4 hours]. Come back. Don't you dare add water!

Recipe By : Rival Crock-Pot Cookbook

File
ftp://ftp.idiscover.co.uk/pub/food/m...s/mmdja006.zip

MMMMM

--

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Old 09-11-2015, 11:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

On 11/9/2015 3:50 PM, wrote:
in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


As Carol already said, dried beans are really cheap, get good at
soaking those and you'll have more money to spend on other food.

As for canned, I like Goya or Progresso.

Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options than
beans and ramen.


That can get really old, really fast. And it's not especially
nutritious, either.

Buy chicken parts when they are on sale. You can bake them or
you can make chicken stock with them, which leads me to soup. A
big pot of vegetable soup can be very cheap, whether you make it
with chicken stock or vegetable stock. The point is, soup is a great
way to stretch ingredients.

If you can chop onions, garlic, etc., you can make a pot of
pasta sauce that can last for many meals, with pasta you can
buy on sale. You don't need mad skills in the kitchen to get
started making that kind of food.

I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the first time

this year).

Good. Eggs are a great meal that will be a terrific source of protein
and aren't too expensive. You can stretch those with vegetables and
mushrooms, whatever you like and is available for cheap, and it's a
good sized meal. Learn to make omelets. Easy.

Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Well, you have a whole new adventure, learning to make food and saving
money at the same time.

When I was hurting for money, I ate boxed mac n cheese. You can do so
much better.

Best of luck to you, ask questions and people will be happy to
answer. I hope you stick around.

nancy


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Old 10-11-2015, 02:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

Nancy Young wrote in rec.food.cooking:

On 11/9/2015 3:50 PM, wrote:
in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


As Carol already said, dried beans are really cheap, get good at
soaking those and you'll have more money to spend on other food.

As for canned, I like Goya or Progresso.

Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options
than beans and ramen.


That can get really old, really fast. And it's not especially
nutritious, either.

Buy chicken parts when they are on sale. You can bake them or
you can make chicken stock with them, which leads me to soup. A
big pot of vegetable soup can be very cheap, whether you make it
with chicken stock or vegetable stock. The point is, soup is a great
way to stretch ingredients.

If you can chop onions, garlic, etc., you can make a pot of
pasta sauce that can last for many meals, with pasta you can
buy on sale. You don't need mad skills in the kitchen to get
started making that kind of food.

I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the first time
this year).


Good. Eggs are a great meal that will be a terrific source of protein
and aren't too expensive. You can stretch those with vegetables and
mushrooms, whatever you like and is available for cheap, and it's a
good sized meal. Learn to make omelets. Easy.

Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Well, you have a whole new adventure, learning to make food and saving
money at the same time.

When I was hurting for money, I ate boxed mac n cheese. You can do so
much better.

Best of luck to you, ask questions and people will be happy to
answer. I hope you stick around.

nancy


Hi Nancy,

I just did Mac-N-Cheese but cheaper than a box and really good stuff.

16oz dry elbows boiled up
1.5 cups chopped/cubed cheese (cheddar, white and 1/2 cup knock off
velveeta)
2 cans evaporated milk

That was the essentials and it was baked. I added pizzaz with some
french frided onions and some dehydrated onions and a bit of black
ground blended pepper.

I completely filled a large casserole dish with this. I'd say 10 main
dish servings worth? Cost, about 3$ if that. 30cents a serving. In
fact, I think I just beat ramen prices there?

Rice is also a good one. You can even spice it and roll into balls for
snacks.

I also hope they stick around.

Carol

--

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Old 10-11-2015, 02:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

On Mon, 9 Nov 2015 18:21:35 -0500, Nancy Young
wrote:

On 11/9/2015 3:50 PM, wrote:
in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


As Carol already said, dried beans are really cheap, get good at
soaking those and you'll have more money to spend on other food.

As for canned, I like Goya or Progresso.

Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options than
beans and ramen.


That can get really old, really fast. And it's not especially
nutritious, either.

Buy chicken parts when they are on sale. You can bake them or
you can make chicken stock with them, which leads me to soup. A
big pot of vegetable soup can be very cheap, whether you make it
with chicken stock or vegetable stock. The point is, soup is a great
way to stretch ingredients.

If you can chop onions, garlic, etc., you can make a pot of
pasta sauce that can last for many meals, with pasta you can
buy on sale. You don't need mad skills in the kitchen to get
started making that kind of food.

I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the first time

this year).

Good. Eggs are a great meal that will be a terrific source of protein
and aren't too expensive. You can stretch those with vegetables and
mushrooms, whatever you like and is available for cheap, and it's a
good sized meal. Learn to make omelets. Easy.

Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Well, you have a whole new adventure, learning to make food and saving
money at the same time.

When I was hurting for money, I ate boxed mac n cheese. You can do so
much better.

Best of luck to you, ask questions and people will be happy to
answer. I hope you stick around.

nancy


Ramen can be quite nutritious with veggies and a couple eggs... I
reserved a few slices of roast boneless pork loin to julienne into a
ramen soup, with onion, garlic, carrot, celery, dried herbs, grated
ginger, toasted sesame seed oil, a corn starch slurry, and a couple
beaten eggs, even a small can of 'shrooms, cheap and fast... somtimes
I have bok choy and other veggies, even a couple tomatoes from my
garden. Many a time I've turned ramen into major gourmet. Ramen
supreme will be lunch tomorrow.
Tomorrow's ddinner will be skinless boneless chicken breasts made into
cutlets, with black bean rice pilaf... chicken was on sale at
$1.69/lb, got a 3 1/2 lb package. Only went into town to pick up the
mail and to buy some snow markers at the 99 store, so got the chicken
and five 2 liter bottles of cherry Coke for $5. The 99 store has the
exact same snow markers as Lowe's only 99 each instead of $2.99 each.
So my plow is attached to my tractor, the snow markers are all in,
I'm ready... let it snow.
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food


wrote in message
...
I just moved in with my bf thousands of miles away from my mothers house.
When I looked in his fridge I almost had a heart attack. All that was in it
were basic condiments, and two cartons of expired almond milk! His freezer
had two big bags of Birdseye(ugh) Thai stir fry, and some hamburger meat
(only like chicken, bacon, and occasionally ground beef in tacos). D:


That's it! No cheese, fresh veggies, eggs, or bacon. The only spice he has
is salt!!!!! I always had a fridge full of food, and cabinet of basic
spices. Even then I would sometimes feel like I had "nothing to eat". Man
how ungrateful I was.

Money is really tight. I'm unemployed, plus he just bought my ticket to
arrive. He had to fix his car and is a few hundred dollars

---

That's more than my husband had. He either had nothing at all or some
leftover pizza. He didn't even have much in the cabinets. There was one
cheap pot with no lid, a bent fork, butter knife, spoon, cereal bowl and a
plate. Also some ashtrays. Maybe a coffee cup. His mom bought these
things.

The cheapest foods do not involve meat. Use beans for your protein. If you
can buy in bulk, they may be cheaper. But you might want to factor in the
cost of cooking them so you might be better off getting canned. If you're
not brand loyal, store brands are often cheaper. If you have a Big Lots
nearby, you might find deals there. Canned tomato sauce is cheap and you
can usually find some sort of Italian seasonging blend for about $1 at the
drugstore. Make your own sauce and serve over pasta. Ramen is also cheap
and you can doctor it up a bit by adding cooked egg, a few vegetables, and a
small amount of meat. Bananas are about the cheapest food that there is.
But carrots, apples, onions and potatoes are usually cheap too. The type of
produce you can get for cheap depends on where you live though.

Other cheap proteins are nuts, cheese and eggs although the price of those
things seems to be increasing. However, you don't need to eat protein with
every meal and do look at the other foods you are eating. For instance,
wheat does contain a little protein. Rice can be cheap. If you have any
Asian stores or a good Asian section in your grocery store you can likely
get it cheaper there. Oatmeal is also cheap. And popcorn. Pop your own in
a pan with a little oil.

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Old 10-11-2015, 09:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food


wrote in message
...
in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


Really depends on what is on sale. Since you have Walmart, go there. Their
brand of beans is pretty cheap. Safeway probably has higher prices on most
everything.


Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options than
beans and ramen. I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the
first time this year). Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Then that could present a problem. Get yourself a can of tomato sauce.
Whatever kind is the cheapest but not the tiny one. Get about a 16 oz.
size. Put that in a large pan with some water to thin it down. Start by
adding another two cans of water, but you can add more if you find that the
end result is too thick. Add a chopped onion, a carrot or two and a rib or
two of celery, sliced. If you have a potato or two you can add those, just
chop into cubes. Get some cheap Italian seasoning (Walmart should have it)
and add a few shakes of that and also some black pepper. Bring this to a
boil, then turn the heat down to a simmer. When the vegetables are tender,
add a can of whatever beans you have, a can of green beans and a can of
corn. Add the liquid as well. Heat through then taste. You may or may not
have to add salt. This will yield a very big pot of soup that will feed you
for several days. If you don't want to keep eating the same thing day after
day, you can freeze some. A little parmesan cheese goes nicely on top of
this.

You can make many different variations of this soup. If you have a little
more money, you can use V8 or tomato juice instead of the tomato sauce. You
can add some chicken or beef broth. You can vary the vegetables that you
use. Such as chopped tomatoes (fresh or canned), zucchini, bell pepper,
broccoli, cauliflower, hominy, whatever you like.

You can make cheap chili buy combining three different cans of beans with
their liquid, a can of corn with liquid and a jar of salsa. Heat through.
To stretch it further, serve over rice. If you want more heat to it, add
chili powder. If you can afford toppings, you can top with sour cream,
gaucamole or avocado, cheese, chopped onion, chopped tomato, chopped hot
peppers, cilantro. This will make a big pot but you can freeze the
leftovers.

Bread is easy to doctor up. Walmart sells some kind that is cheap. Spread
it with butter, margarine or even olive oil, then sprinkle on a little
powdered garlic and some Parmesan cheese.

Grilled cheese sandwiches are cheap to make but not something I do well with
so... You can either toast your bread in the toaster or oven, then spread
with butter or margarine, make a sandwich with cheese inside, and put it in
the microwave until the cheese melts. Note that this is not my favorite way
to do it as I don't think it is very good this way. But you can wrap the
sandwiches in foil and put in the oven until the cheese melts. That will
give you a texture more like a grilled cheese.

When you are doing your shopping, look for Thanksgiving type foods as they
will be cheap right now. You will likely find good deals on crackers, cream
soups and canned vegetables.

You can make an easy casserole by cooking some pasta, following the package
directions, then draining and putting it in the casserole. Macaroni is
generally your cheapest form of pasta. But look in the Mexican food
section. There will be little packages of pasta that might be your best
deal. You can usually get those for around 30 to 50 cents each but there are
not many servings in a package. You will then need some form of sauce.
Here's where your condensed soup comes in. Now you can make a sauce from
scratch but you likely won't have those ingredients. You can use cream of
mushroom or cream of celery. Mushroom goes well with tuna. One can will
make 4 servings. So use that much pasta, 4 servings. And your can of soup,
just straight from the can. Then add a can or pouch of tuna, salmon or
chicken. Or any leftover cooked meat. If you have no meat, you could add a
little cheese for protein. You can even use a gravy packet made up instead
of the soup. You should be able to find deals on those right now. Mix that
all up and put in the oven at 350 degrees until heated through. Should take
maybe 20 minutes. If you want a little crunch on the top, you can add a few
crushed potato chips or whatever crackers you have.

Another casserole that is cheap to make this time of year starts with a box
of stuffing mix. Make it as directed. You can add less fat (butter,
margarine, oil) than it calls for if you need to save money there. Put the
made up stuffing in your casserole then add a little meat. You can use
chicken or turkey lunch meat that has been cut up. You don't need a lot.
Then add a packet of gravy that has been made up. You can also add a can of
vegetables such as corn, peas or green beans. Bake as above.

The casserole that we ate tons of when I was growing up was called Spaghetti
Red, although my mom used macaroni to make it. It's just the cooked
macaroni, then some form of tomato product (whatever we had in the house at
the time) some cooked ground beef and a little chili powder. This doesn't
even have to be baked as a casserole but that's how my mom usually did it.
Can be heated on top of the stove. If you leave out the chili powder and
add canned or frozen corn, it's called Johnny Rozetti. You can add some
cheese on top of this for serving.

Keep an eye out for coupons. There should be a lot of food ones out this
time of year. You may be able to find some for things like Hamburger Helper
which you might not want to eat. Or you might want to make this up as a
side dish without the meat. Or you might do as some people do and dispose
of the seasoning packet and just use the pasta that comes in the box. I
would only suggest doing this though if you can get that box for free or for
around 25 cents.

You can also doctor up a box of macaroni and cheese (even the cheap store
brand) by adding a little extra cheese to it, a little cooked meat such as
chicken, tuna or ground beef or even some cooked vegetables.

Do you like yogurt? My Walmart has some in a box that is cheap. I think
there are 8 cups of yogurt in there and it is cheaper than buying the
singles. You can use yogurt to make a parfait with a little fruit and cold
cereal. Just make layers.


Thanks a lot. I enjoy reading what's on your plate. Maybe one day I can
cook like you guys


BTW we have Walmart and Safeway near us, along with a few other places.


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Old 10-11-2015, 09:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 44,155
Default Super cheap food


wrote in message
...
I just moved in with my bf thousands of miles away from my mothers house.
When I looked in his fridge I almost had a heart attack. All that was in it
were basic condiments, and two cartons of expired almond milk! His freezer
had two big bags of Birdseye(ugh) Thai stir fry, and some hamburger meat
(only like chicken, bacon, and occasionally ground beef in tacos). D:


That's it! No cheese, fresh veggies, eggs, or bacon. The only spice he has
is salt!!!!! I always had a fridge full of food, and cabinet of basic
spices. Even then I would sometimes feel like I had "nothing to eat". Man
how ungrateful I was.

Money is really tight. I'm unemployed, plus he just bought my ticket to
arrive. He had to fix his car and is a few hundred dollars

---

Here are some more ideas.

Tuna melts. Get some English Muffins. Split them and put them on a cookie
sheet. Then add a good sized scoop of tuna salad. To make the tuna salad,
start with tuna from a can or pouch. Drain off the excess liquid. Then add
some mayo, Miracle Whip, cottage cheese or even plain yogurt. Whatever you
have in the house. If you don't have any of these things, you can make it
without. It's just that they help to bind it so it will be a little messy
to eat without. Then add a small amount of chopped onion, chopped celery,
chopped sweet pickle. These things aren't really necessary either but will
add flavor. If you have a tomato in the house, you can add a slice of
tomato under the tuna. But again, not necessary. Then top with whatever
cheese you have. Either a slice or a little grated. Put the pan in the
oven at 350 degrees until heated through and cheese is melted. Maybe 10
minutes. You can also make this with chicken instead of the tuna. I like a
bit of chopped apple mixed in.

You can also use the English Muffins to make pizza. Put them on a cookie
sheet as above. Then top with sauce. I just use canned tomato sauce with a
little added Italian seasoning. Then add cheese. Mozzarella would be
traditional but you can use any kind that you have. Then whatever other
pizza type toppings you like. Bake as above.

If you don't have English Muffins, you can use plain bread for either of
these things. It just won't get as crisp or be as firm as the English
muffin will.



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Old 10-11-2015, 10:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

On 11/9/2015 6:21 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
On 11/9/2015 3:50 PM, wrote:
in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


As Carol already said, dried beans are really cheap, get good at
soaking those and you'll have more money to spend on other food.

As for canned, I like Goya or Progresso.

Store brand canned beans work just as well and are likely to come from
the same mfg.

Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options than
beans and ramen.


That can get really old, really fast. And it's not especially
nutritious, either.

Ramen is not healthy. Those "noodles" are deep fried so what you get is
a lot of fat without a lot of substance. And a heck of a lot of salt in
that seasoning packet. I'm not afraid of salt, mind you. But Ramen
seasoning is ridiculously salty.

Buy chicken parts when they are on sale. You can bake them or
you can make chicken stock with them, which leads me to soup. A
big pot of vegetable soup can be very cheap, whether you make it
with chicken stock or vegetable stock. The point is, soup is a great
way to stretch ingredients.

It sure is.

If you can chop onions, garlic, etc., you can make a pot of
pasta sauce that can last for many meals, with pasta you can
buy on sale. You don't need mad skills in the kitchen to get
started making that kind of food.

We all had to start somewhere. Me, I started with watching some cooking
shows on public television. And I was given a cookbook. Nope, it
wasn't Joy of Cooking. It was the Good Housekeeping Cookbook.

I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the first time

this year).

Scrambled eggs are one of the tests many chefs use - if you can scramble
an egg you can cook pretty much anything. However, the desired
consistency of scrambled eggs (and ingredients) may vary depending upon
who you ask.

Good. Eggs are a great meal that will be a terrific source of protein
and aren't too expensive. You can stretch those with vegetables and
mushrooms, whatever you like and is available for cheap, and it's a
good sized meal. Learn to make omelets. Easy.

Absolutely!

Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Ditto. My mom earned the nickname "Freezer Queen". She glommed onto
frozen family size "entrees" by that name in the 1960's and never looked
back. Ditto Betty Crocker boxed potatoes. Instant mashed potato
flakes. Mom did not enjoy cooking. Not everyone does.

Well, you have a whole new adventure, learning to make food and saving
money at the same time.

When I was hurting for money, I ate boxed mac n cheese. You can do so
much better.

Best of luck to you, ask questions and people will be happy to
answer. I hope you stick around.

nancy


Agreed. Learning to shop wisely is the first step. One does not have
to live on Ramen.

Jill
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Old 10-11-2015, 11:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food


"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
On 11/9/2015 6:21 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
On 11/9/2015 3:50 PM, wrote:
in debt. My sends me about 50 bucks a week.


Tonight we are going to pick up some ramen. Boringgggg.

I know beans are cheap, and recommendations on which brands to get?


As Carol already said, dried beans are really cheap, get good at
soaking those and you'll have more money to spend on other food.

As for canned, I like Goya or Progresso.

Store brand canned beans work just as well and are likely to come from the
same mfg.


Agree with one exception. I did try one store brand of refried that were
super runny. Tasted fine. I just prefer thicker. I am not brand loyal
when it comes to beans at all. The only reason I do not buy the Walmart
brand is that it states on the can, "May contain traces of..." and then a
list of stuff I can't eat. But for most people they would be fine.

Any suggestions appreciated. It would be nice to have more options than
beans and ramen.


That can get really old, really fast. And it's not especially
nutritious, either.

Ramen is not healthy. Those "noodles" are deep fried so what you get is a
lot of fat without a lot of substance. And a heck of a lot of salt in
that seasoning packet. I'm not afraid of salt, mind you. But Ramen
seasoning is ridiculously salty.


Agree but I think once in a while they would be fine to eat.

Buy chicken parts when they are on sale. You can bake them or
you can make chicken stock with them, which leads me to soup. A
big pot of vegetable soup can be very cheap, whether you make it
with chicken stock or vegetable stock. The point is, soup is a great
way to stretch ingredients.

It sure is.

If you can chop onions, garlic, etc., you can make a pot of
pasta sauce that can last for many meals, with pasta you can
buy on sale. You don't need mad skills in the kitchen to get
started making that kind of food.

We all had to start somewhere. Me, I started with watching some cooking
shows on public television. And I was given a cookbook. Nope, it wasn't
Joy of Cooking. It was the Good Housekeeping Cookbook.

I'm a total noob to cooking(made scrambled eggs for the first time

this year).

Scrambled eggs are one of the tests many chefs use - if you can scramble
an egg you can cook pretty much anything. However, the desired
consistency of scrambled eggs (and ingredients) may vary depending upon
who you ask.

Good. Eggs are a great meal that will be a terrific source of protein
and aren't too expensive. You can stretch those with vegetables and
mushrooms, whatever you like and is available for cheap, and it's a
good sized meal. Learn to make omelets. Easy.

Absolutely!

Grew up on mostly proccesed frozen, and fast food.


Ditto. My mom earned the nickname "Freezer Queen". She glommed onto
frozen family size "entrees" by that name in the 1960's and never looked
back. Ditto Betty Crocker boxed potatoes. Instant mashed potato flakes.
Mom did not enjoy cooking. Not everyone does.

Well, you have a whole new adventure, learning to make food and saving
money at the same time.

When I was hurting for money, I ate boxed mac n cheese. You can do so
much better.

Best of luck to you, ask questions and people will be happy to
answer. I hope you stick around.

nancy


Agreed. Learning to shop wisely is the first step. One does not have to
live on Ramen.


And I will add since she can go to Walmart, she might look at the Halloween
clearance foods. Mine had cereal for cheap but there might be other things
too. It's not always just candy.

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Old 10-11-2015, 03:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

On 11/10/2015 5:32 AM, jmcquown wrote:
On 11/9/2015 6:21 PM, Nancy Young wrote:


As for canned, I like Goya or Progresso.

Store brand canned beans work just as well and are likely to come from
the same mfg.


I have found some of those that were not up to par, so I stick to
those brand names. Having said that, if I was on a strict budget,
agreed that I would get the cheapest ones I could find.

Or learn to soak beans successfully. Not something I have done well,
and I just haven't bothered with it much. Someone else will have
to advise on that, let's just say.

Buy chicken parts when they are on sale. You can bake them or
you can make chicken stock with them, which leads me to soup. A
big pot of vegetable soup can be very cheap, whether you make it
with chicken stock or vegetable stock. The point is, soup is a great
way to stretch ingredients.

It sure is.


I missed saying buy chicken legs/thighs or drumsticks on sale.
That's where you'll get a lot for little, not to mention the
white meat wouldn't be what I'd use for stock.

We all had to start somewhere. Me, I started with watching some cooking
shows on public television. And I was given a cookbook. Nope, it
wasn't Joy of Cooking. It was the Good Housekeeping Cookbook.


That's a good one. Basic stuff that will teach you techniques.
America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook is another one like that.

Agreed. Learning to shop wisely is the first step. One does not have
to live on Ramen.


I have nothing against it, particularly, but I wouldn't want to live
on it. Even when I make it (never, anymore), I'd add a handful of
frozen broccoli florets to make it less ... ramen.

nancy

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Old 10-11-2015, 03:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

Nancy Young wrote:

jmcquown wrote:
One does not have to live on Ramen.


I have nothing against it, particularly, but I wouldn't want to live
on it. Even when I make it (never, anymore), I'd add a handful of
frozen broccoli florets to make it less ... ramen.


Jill doesn't seem to think "beyond the box." Ramen noodle soup can be
eaten on it's own but doesn't have much nutrition plus lots of salt.
It can be used as a soup base to make some nice soups though. Add in
any available vegetables, use chicken stock rather than water. Once
you enhance this stuff, the nutrition level can go way up and the
sodium count will go down.

Again, think of it as a soup starter, not a finished product.
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Old 10-11-2015, 04:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Super cheap food

Gary wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:

jmcquown wrote:
One does not have to live on Ramen.


I have nothing against it, particularly, but I wouldn't want to live
on it. Even when I make it (never, anymore), I'd add a handful of
frozen broccoli florets to make it less ... ramen.


Jill doesn't seem to think "beyond the box." Ramen noodle soup can be
eaten on it's own but doesn't have much nutrition plus lots of salt.
It can be used as a soup base to make some nice soups though. Add in
any available vegetables, use chicken stock rather than water. Once
you enhance this stuff, the nutrition level can go way up and the
sodium count will go down.

Again, think of it as a soup starter, not a finished product.

Bullion cubes can also be used and are super cost-effective.


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