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Old 10-06-2015, 05:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,alt.food.barbecue
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

Forget that KC luzer-Q - these are WINNING ribs!


http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/g...pork-ribs.html

Ever since taking up competition barbecue, I've become obsessed with
finding a way to make the most consistently perfect slow-smoked pork
ribs that can elicit awards from faceless judges. In the process, my rib
method has grown to include all sorts of meticulous steps, like wrapping
the ribs in foil at just the right time, adding a braising liquid to get
them perfectly tender, and monitoring the temperature more closely than
doctors keeping tabs on patient's vitals in the ICU.

The resulting competition ribs have earned me a few trophies, but
they're honestly not the kind I love most. You see, I'd rather use a
simpler method and push the flavor with additional spices and heat, but
that can be risky in a competition setting, since I don't want to take
that chance on judges with sensitive palates.

My theories on barbecue sauce are in constant evolution. A few years
ago, you would have never seen me use ketchup, but now I'm all for it
because, in many cases, it makes a more crowd-pleasing sauce than the
tomato sauce I used to insist on. I also would have said that fruit
sauces should be made with fresh fruit, not jams or preserves. But now I
use both kinds because I've come to realize that jams already have a lot
of the sugar I would otherwise have to add to a sauce made with fresh fruit.

When I made this particular apricot barbecue sauce, I grabbed a
good-quality bottle of preserves without giving it a second
thought€”apricots weren't in season at the time, anyway. Then I built up
the layers of barbecue sauce flavor around it, including ketchup,
vinegar, onion, Worcestershire, garlic, honey, and mustard.

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Old 10-06-2015, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,alt.food.barbecue
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:58:10 -0600, La Mirada wrote:

Forget that KC luzer-Q - these are WINNING ribs!

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/g...pork-ribs.html


Those pics are definitely photoshopped... and still those ribs look
slimey.

The resulting competition ribs have earned me a few trophies, but
they're honestly not the kind I love most. You see, I'd rather use a
simpler method and push the flavor with additional spices and heat, but
that can be risky in a competition setting, since I don't want to take
that chance on old fart judges with TIAD palates.


BBQ sauce serves one purpose and one purpose only, to hide the
flavor/texture of crap cooked ribs... sauced ribs are tantamont to
slathering a steak with Heinz red... if your ribs are better with
sauce, any sauce, they are only fit for a land fill. Concentrate on
cooking ribs, forget sauce.
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Old 10-06-2015, 08:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:58:10 -0600, La Mirada wrote:

When I made this particular apricot barbecue sauce, I grabbed a
good-quality bottle of preserves without giving it a second
thought—apricots weren't in season at the time, anyway. Then I built up
the layers of barbecue sauce flavor around it, including ketchup,
vinegar, onion, Worcestershire, garlic, honey, and mustard.


I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg

--

sf
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Old 10-06-2015, 08:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,alt.food.barbecue
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 6/10/2015 1:09 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:58:10 -0600, La Mirada wrote:

Forget that KC luzer-Q - these are WINNING ribs!

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/g...pork-ribs.html


Those pics are definitely photoshopped... and still those ribs look
slimey.


You're huffing paint again, right?

The resulting competition ribs have earned me a few trophies, but
they're honestly not the kind I love most. You see, I'd rather use a
simpler method and push the flavor with additional spices and heat, but
that can be risky in a competition setting, since I don't want to take
that chance on old fart judges with TIAD palates.


BBQ sauce serves one purpose and one purpose only, to hide the
flavor/texture of crap cooked ribs... sauced ribs are tantamont to
slathering a steak with Heinz red... if your ribs are better with
sauce, any sauce, they are only fit for a land fill. Concentrate on
cooking ribs, forget sauce.


While I generally tend to agree, and think sauce is best for dipping,
there is place for a nice glaze on any finished rib.

This apricot one is particularly tasty, albeit I tweaked my version to
substitute some Hoi Sin for the catsup.

And I like honey mustard over the typical yellow.

Don't be such a stick in the mud - open up, try new things!


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Old 10-06-2015, 08:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 6/10/2015 1:17 PM, sf wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:58:10 -0600, La Mirada wrote:

When I made this particular apricot barbecue sauce, I grabbed a
good-quality bottle of preserves without giving it a second
thought—apricots weren't in season at the time, anyway. Then I built up
the layers of barbecue sauce flavor around it, including ketchup,
vinegar, onion, Worcestershire, garlic, honey, and mustard.


I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg



Wow!

Great pic and perfectly cooked salmon!


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Old 10-06-2015, 09:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 13:40:07 -0600, La Mirada wrote:

On 6/10/2015 1:09 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:58:10 -0600, La Mirada wrote:


http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/g...pork-ribs.html



Don't be such a stick in the mud - open up, try new things!

I just realized I can use the jalapeno jam I made and hate because
it's too sweet in BBQ sauce! I wouldn't have had that epiphany if I
hadn't read the article. So thanks!

--

sf
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 6/10/2015 2:30 PM, sf wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 13:40:07 -0600, La Mirada wrote:

On 6/10/2015 1:09 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:58:10 -0600, La Mirada wrote:


http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/g...pork-ribs.html


Don't be such a stick in the mud - open up, try new things!

I just realized I can use the jalapeno jam I made and hate because
it's too sweet in BBQ sauce! I wouldn't have had that epiphany if I
hadn't read the article. So thanks!



That's excellent, we have great local availability of that product here,
but I bet yours is going to be a perfect fit in this recipe due to the
sweetness you mentioned.

I also like to use a sweet mustard in mine, like Inglehoffers.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Inglehoffe...of-12/17770747

Pork plays well with sweet and fruit and as a glaze the flavors are not
excessive.
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 2015-06-10 3:17 PM, sf wrote:

I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg


I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.

It is one thing that I tend to do in a similar manner every time. I use
just a little salt and pepper, some lemon juice, olive oil or butter,
and a bit if fresh dill weed. It can be pan fried, baked or grilled. It
is hard to beat.



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Old 10-06-2015, 10:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 6/10/2015 2:54 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2015-06-10 3:17 PM, sf wrote:

I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg


I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.


You'd be oh so wrong too:

http://honeysmokedfish.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNPhY-mM-cA

Smoked Salmon is a show stopper on any dinner table when it's perfectly
cooked. In this video, I decided to smoke a 1 3/4 pound filet. I also
wanted to brine and glaze it so I started looking around for ideas. I
also wanted to incorporate some Jack Daniels Tennessee Honey into the
recipe. The recipe I used in this video is based on one I found in the
book "Slow Fire" by Ray "Dr. BBQ" Lampe.


It is one thing that I tend to do in a similar manner every time. I use
just a little salt and pepper, some lemon juice, olive oil or butter,
and a bit if fresh dill weed. It can be pan fried, baked or grilled. It
is hard to beat.


Nothing wrong with that way either.

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Old 11-06-2015, 12:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at 5:06:12 PM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:
On 6/10/2015 2:54 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2015-06-10 3:17 PM, sf wrote:

I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg


I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.


You'd be oh so wrong too:


Not wrong. His taste is different from yours, that's all. I don't
like fruit or sweet things with meat, either. I can tolerate a
little teriyaki (if it's properly done--not that syrup in a bottle),
or a little sweetness with ham. But my capacity for enjoying
sweet and meat is extremely limited.

Even my "barbecue" sauce is tangy and hot, to balance out its
sweetness. (I place "barbecue" in quotes because I realize that
I rarely barbecue, but it's pleasant on grilled chicken or pork.)

Cindy Hamilton


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Old 11-06-2015, 02:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2015-06-11 7:56 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at 5:06:12 PM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:


I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.


You'd be oh so wrong too:


Not wrong. His taste is different from yours, that's all. I don't
like fruit or sweet things with meat, either. I can tolerate a
little teriyaki (if it's properly done--not that syrup in a bottle),
or a little sweetness with ham. But my capacity for enjoying
sweet and meat is extremely limited.

Even my "barbecue" sauce is tangy and hot, to balance out its
sweetness. (I place "barbecue" in quotes because I realize that
I rarely barbecue, but it's pleasant on grilled chicken or pork.)



Bingo. I did mention that it was my experience. I remember once going
to a restaurant where the the items on the menu all seemed to have
something strange in them that did not appeal to me. I opted for salmon
with a honey mustard glaze because it was the least objectionable. I had
reservations about the sweet glaze. The fish was great, but, as I
expected, the glaze was too sweet for my taste. I had not totally
forgotten that dish when I recently tried salmon with a maple and
mustard glaze. Once again, the fish was good, but I thought it was too
sweet.

I like a sharp, unsweetened apple sauce with pork, cranberry sauce
with chicken or turkey, mint sauce with lamb... not jelly. We rarely use
BBQ sauce, and if I do use some, like on ribs, I have to leave it off my
wife's portion. She does not like condiments with her meat, and
especially dislikes sweet one.

One of my favourite local restaurants offers a Thai fish dish that I
tried once. The sweetness was a problem for me.

Obviously, lots of people will disagree. Chicken fingers and nuggets
are quite popular. Lots of people love the Buffalo wings at a local
place. As much as I love the original style, with just margarine and
Frank's sauce, I used to find their wings too sweet.
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Old 11-06-2015, 04:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 6/11/2015 5:56 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at 5:06:12 PM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:
On 6/10/2015 2:54 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2015-06-10 3:17 PM, sf wrote:

I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg

I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.


You'd be oh so wrong too:


Not wrong. His taste is different from yours, that's all.


And a lot of folks too.

I don't
like fruit or sweet things with meat, either. I can tolerate a
little teriyaki (if it's properly done--not that syrup in a bottle),
or a little sweetness with ham. But my capacity for enjoying
sweet and meat is extremely limited.


Yet I think you'd agree that honey and salmon are accepted as a good match.

Even my "barbecue" sauce is tangy and hot, to balance out its
sweetness. (I place "barbecue" in quotes because I realize that
I rarely barbecue, but it's pleasant on grilled chicken or pork.)

Cindy Hamilton


Tastes will of course vary.

I think you'd be comfortable with Texas style Q.

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Old 11-06-2015, 10:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 11:30:56 AM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:
On 6/11/2015 5:56 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at 5:06:12 PM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:
On 6/10/2015 2:54 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2015-06-10 3:17 PM, sf wrote:

I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg

I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.

You'd be oh so wrong too:


Not wrong. His taste is different from yours, that's all.


And a lot of folks too.

I don't
like fruit or sweet things with meat, either. I can tolerate a
little teriyaki (if it's properly done--not that syrup in a bottle),
or a little sweetness with ham. But my capacity for enjoying
sweet and meat is extremely limited.


Yet I think you'd agree that honey and salmon are accepted as a good match.


Accepted by some, or perhaps even most.

Even my "barbecue" sauce is tangy and hot, to balance out its
sweetness. (I place "barbecue" in quotes because I realize that
I rarely barbecue, but it's pleasant on grilled chicken or pork.)

Cindy Hamilton


Tastes will of course vary.

I think you'd be comfortable with Texas style Q.


I am. It's good stuff, and I'm always happy when I can get it.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Apricot glaze baby backs

On 6/11/2015 3:27 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 11:30:56 AM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:
On 6/11/2015 5:56 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at 5:06:12 PM UTC-4, La Mirada wrote:
On 6/10/2015 2:54 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2015-06-10 3:17 PM, sf wrote:

I saw salmon with an orange ginger chili glaze this morning that
looked amazing. http://oi60.tinypic.com/4zu4wh.jpg

I appreciate that it is nice to have different ways to cook things, but
my experience tells me that sweet does not go well with salmon. I eat
salmon 3-4 times a month. I have tried a number of different recipes
and some had honey or other sweet ingredients. Those ones typically
ended up on the interesting but don't bother again list.

You'd be oh so wrong too:

Not wrong. His taste is different from yours, that's all.


And a lot of folks too.

I don't
like fruit or sweet things with meat, either. I can tolerate a
little teriyaki (if it's properly done--not that syrup in a bottle),
or a little sweetness with ham. But my capacity for enjoying
sweet and meat is extremely limited.


Yet I think you'd agree that honey and salmon are accepted as a good match.


Accepted by some, or perhaps even most.

Even my "barbecue" sauce is tangy and hot, to balance out its
sweetness. (I place "barbecue" in quotes because I realize that
I rarely barbecue, but it's pleasant on grilled chicken or pork.)

Cindy Hamilton


Tastes will of course vary.

I think you'd be comfortable with Texas style Q.


I am. It's good stuff, and I'm always happy when I can get it.

Cindy Hamilton



You likely do well with Carolina style too, either the vinegary tomato
or mustard.


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