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Old 10-11-2004, 04:31 PM
TammyM
 
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Default Who ya gonna believe?


Oi. I'm looking into freezing some baked goods for later use. The
Pillsbury site sez that custard pies like pumpkin can be frozen.
The Betty Croker site sez that custard pies, including pumpkin, do not
freeze successfully. I'm caught between Betty and the Pillsbury doughboy
(sounds rather naughty...) Who to believe? Anyone have any words of
wisdom born of actual experience?

On a related subject, all the sites seem to agree that freezing cookies,
either baked or just the dough, works out just fine.

I'm just trying to find ways to ameliorate that last minute hectic out of
my mind holiday scramble!

Many thanks,
Tammy
Saccamenna, Caulifornia

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Old 10-11-2004, 04:36 PM
Goomba38
 
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TammyM wrote:

Oi. I'm looking into freezing some baked goods for later use. The
Pillsbury site sez that custard pies like pumpkin can be frozen.
The Betty Croker site sez that custard pies, including pumpkin, do not
freeze successfully. I'm caught between Betty and the Pillsbury doughboy
(sounds rather naughty...) Who to believe? Anyone have any words of
wisdom born of actual experience?


I've never been all that impressed with pies that
have been frozen, but manufacturers do it all the
time? Maybe you'll find the results more
satisfactory? Why not make one today test drive
the freezing, defrosting and eating? Let us know!
Goomba

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Old 11-11-2004, 01:36 AM
Virginia Tadrzynski
 
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"TammyM" wrote in message
...

Oi. I'm looking into freezing some baked goods for later use. The
Pillsbury site sez that custard pies like pumpkin can be frozen.
The Betty Croker site sez that custard pies, including pumpkin, do not
freeze successfully. I'm caught between Betty and the Pillsbury doughboy
(sounds rather naughty...) Who to believe? Anyone have any words of
wisdom born of actual experience?

On a related subject, all the sites seem to agree that freezing cookies,
either baked or just the dough, works out just fine.

I'm just trying to find ways to ameliorate that last minute hectic out of
my mind holiday scramble!

Many thanks,
Tammy
Saccamenna, Caulifornia


I made and froze pumpkin and sweet tater pies last year when we had a bumper
crop. Thawed the last one a week or so ago. Not that I recommend keeping
one in the deep freeze for a year, but the taste was fine. Just thawed it
and popped it in the oven to heat through. Wrapped foil around the crust to
keep it from burning, though.

When I froze them, I put them in three layers of aluminum foil first.

-Ginny


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Old 11-11-2004, 01:55 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default

"Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote in
:


"TammyM" wrote in message
...

Oi. I'm looking into freezing some baked goods for later use. The
Pillsbury site sez that custard pies like pumpkin can be frozen.
The Betty Croker site sez that custard pies, including pumpkin, do not
freeze successfully. I'm caught between Betty and the Pillsbury
doughboy (sounds rather naughty...) Who to believe? Anyone have any
words of wisdom born of actual experience?

On a related subject, all the sites seem to agree that freezing
cookies, either baked or just the dough, works out just fine.

I'm just trying to find ways to ameliorate that last minute hectic out
of my mind holiday scramble!

Many thanks,
Tammy
Saccamenna, Caulifornia


I made and froze pumpkin and sweet tater pies last year when we had a
bumper crop. Thawed the last one a week or so ago. Not that I
recommend keeping one in the deep freeze for a year, but the taste was
fine. Just thawed it and popped it in the oven to heat through.
Wrapped foil around the crust to keep it from burning, though.

When I froze them, I put them in three layers of aluminum foil first.

-Ginny


They also work quite well freezing them unbaked. First freeze the pie
shell, then pour in the filling, place on a cookie sheet, and put in the
freezer. Freeze until firm. They can then be vacuumed packed or wrapped
in plastic film and then in foil. Bake the frozen pie (do not thaw) at
375°F for 75-90 minutes, or until filling is firm. Watch crust and cover
edge of crust with foil if browning too quickly.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 11-11-2004, 02:24 AM
TammyM
 
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Default

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
: "Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote in
: and Goomba38 wrote good, helpful advice

To Goomba, Ginny and Wayne, many thanks for your input. It's good to have
actual experience on which to rely. I'll give it a shot, and follow your
words of wisdom.

Gratefully,
Tammy in Ahnold's town
tdmcniff at ucdavis dottaroonie edu


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Old 11-11-2004, 02:38 AM
Terry Pulliam Burd
 
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Default

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 16:31:07 +0000 (UTC), TammyM
wrote:


Oi. I'm looking into freezing some baked goods for later use. The
Pillsbury site sez that custard pies like pumpkin can be frozen.
The Betty Croker site sez that custard pies, including pumpkin, do not
freeze successfully. I'm caught between Betty and the Pillsbury doughboy
(sounds rather naughty...) Who to believe? Anyone have any words of
wisdom born of actual experience?


snip

How long are you wanting to freeze the pies? If it's just a few days,
why not freeze the (unbaked) shells and refrigerate the custard to
assemble later? Custard isn't hugely delicate, but I wouldn't freeze
it myself. Surely, there's a shortcut for something else for The Day
that isn't the showpiece dessert is? I mean, the rest of the meal lies
there in massive bowls, plates, platters and tureens while dessert
sort of stands alone.

Made a killer fun dessert for a family Sunday dinner this past weekend
that I'd never tried before (it doubled well). It was a smash hit, but
requires specialty ceramic molds:

----- Now You're Cooking! v5.60 [Meal-Master Export Format]

Title: Coeurs A La Creme With Blackberries
Categories: desserts
Yield: makes 4 servings

for coeurs à la crème
3/4 lb cream cheese, softened
1 (8-oz) container sour cream
3 tb confectioners sugar, or to
-taste
1/2 ts vanilla
1/2 ts fresh lemon juice
for topping
2 (1/2-pint) containers
-blackberries (11 oz) (may substitute reaspberries)
1 tb granulated sugar
1 tb chambord (optional)
1/2 ts fresh lemon juice

Special equipment: 6 (1/3-cup) ceramic coeur à la crème molds and
cheesecloth
Make coeurs: Beat together cream cheese, sour cream, confectioners
sugar,
vanilla, juice, and a pinch of salt with an electric mixer until
smooth.
Force mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl to remove any fine
lumps.

Line molds with a single layer of dampened cheesecloth and divide
cheese
mixture among molds, smoothing tops. Fold overhanging cheesecloth over
tops, pressing it lightly. Refrigerate molds in a shallow pan or dish
(to
catch drips) at least 4 hours.

Make topping: Mash half of blackberries with granulated sugar. Stir in
remaining whole berries, cassis, and juice, then macerate, stirring
occasionally, 20 minutes.

Unmold coeurs and carefully peel off cheesecloth. Let coeurs stand at
room
temperature 20 minutes before serving. Spoon topping over coeurs.

Cooks' note:

• Coeurs may be chilled in molds up to 2 days, covered.

Contributor: Gourmet

Three tips: Use the supermarket cheesecloth. The good cheesecloth is
too fine. Use old fashioned plastic catsup/mustard squirt bottles to
drizzle the berry sauce. Buy an extra 6 oz. container of berries and
put a few on the side of the coeur. Very pretty.

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


"If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

-- Duncan Hines

To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"


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