General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 06:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,987
Default manicotti strategy

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

It also dawned on me that if a tube is split lengthwise, they are nice for building a small lasagne, as there are lots of grooves to hold the sauce, and a much easier than handling those loooooong noodles too.


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 07:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,987
Default manicotti strategy

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.


I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.


These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 07:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,744
Default manicotti strategy


"Kalmia" wrote in message
...
I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

It also dawned on me that if a tube is split lengthwise, they are nice for
building a small lasagne, as there are lots of grooves to hold the sauce,
and a much easier than handling those loooooong noodles too.

====

You can get plastic pastry nozel tips which you fit into a plastic bag like
a ziplock. All kinds of sizes.



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 08:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18,814
Default manicotti strategy

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:15:03 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.


I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.


These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.


Easy to fill pasta tubes or shells with a pet feeding syringe... I
have a collection of different types from various Vets:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eeding+syringe

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 08:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,987
Default manicotti strategy

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:31:57 PM UTC-5, Paul M. Cook wrote:
"Kalmia" wrote in message
...
I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

It also dawned on me that if a tube is split lengthwise, they are nice for
building a small lasagne, as there are lots of grooves to hold the sauce,
and a much easier than handling those loooooong noodles too.

====

You can get plastic pastry nozel tips which you fit into a plastic bag like
a ziplock. All kinds of sizes.


One more thing or things to mislay, and at my age, I'm downsizing. Small items like nozzles would surely get lost.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 08:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,555
Default manicotti strategy

Kalmia wrote:
I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

It also dawned on me that if a tube is split lengthwise, they are nice for building a small lasagne, as there are lots of grooves to hold the sauce, and a much easier than handling those loooooong noodles too.



What about rolling your own tubes around the filling, like a crepe or
enchilada? That's gotta be easier than stuffing boiled dried tubes.
I'm not sure what the best kind of pasta would be.

(didn't The Frug used to make them like this?)

Bob
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 08:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18,814
Default manicotti strategy

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:16 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 15:01:54 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:15:03 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.

These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.


Easy to fill pasta tubes or shells with a pet feeding syringe... I
have a collection of different types from various Vets:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eeding+syringe


What a waste of time. Mot even enough to fill one shell at a time
(biggest one is 1/4cup). Maybe that would work for filling your
little pee-pee sized ziti (ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!)
rolling eyes.

Big ziplock (or pastry bag) works much better. Fill half the shell
from one end, then fill the other end. No reloading necessary.


Fergot, the dwarf uses his douche bag.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2015, 09:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 12,124
Default manicotti strategy

On 2015-03-02 18:25:25 +0000, Kalmia said:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a
tiny spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are
easier to handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish,
and at a potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next
guy.
It also dawned on me that if a tube is split lengthwise, they are nice
for building a small lasagne, as there are lots of grooves to hold the
sauce, and a much easier than handling those loooooong noodles too.


Have you considered putting the filling into a large pastry bag with a
big pastry tip in place (or just the hole in the bag, depending on its
size) and filling from there with a squeeze?
--
--
Barb
www.barbschaller.com, last update April 2013

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2015, 12:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default manicotti strategy


"l not -l" wrote in message
...

On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a
tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier
to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While
holding
the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.


These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to
hold open, so I rarely use shells.


Understood that they are not shell shaped; I used the term shell to mean
container - such as a cream puff shell. The method of filling I
mentioned
is for filling tubular manicotti pasta "shells".


I should think a pastry bag would work too.

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2015, 12:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default manicotti strategy


"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Kalmia wrote:
I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a
tiny spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier
to handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy. It
also dawned on me that if a tube is split lengthwise, they are nice for
building a small lasagne, as there are lots of grooves to hold the sauce,
and a much easier than handling those loooooong noodles too.



What about rolling your own tubes around the filling, like a crepe or
enchilada? That's gotta be easier than stuffing boiled dried tubes. I'm
not sure what the best kind of pasta would be.

(didn't The Frug used to make them like this?)

Bob


I did see some chef do that but now I can't remember what he used.



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2015, 04:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 88
Default manicotti strategy

Sheldon wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:16 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 15:01:54 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:15:03 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.

These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.

Easy to fill pasta tubes or shells with a pet feeding syringe... I
have a collection of different types from various Vets:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eeding+syringe


What a waste of time. Mot even enough to fill one shell at a time
(biggest one is 1/4cup). Maybe that would work for filling your
little pee-pee sized ziti (ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!)
rolling eyes.

Big ziplock (or pastry bag) works much better. Fill half the shell
from one end, then fill the other end. No reloading necessary.


Fergot, the dwarf uses his douche bag



Yup...the douche bag that went off - ration in _1946_


--
Best
Greg

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2015, 05:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18,814
Default manicotti strategy

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 20:24:05 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

Sheldon wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:16 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 15:01:54 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:15:03 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.

These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.

Easy to fill pasta tubes or shells with a pet feeding syringe... I
have a collection of different types from various Vets:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eeding+syringe

What a waste of time. Mot even enough to fill one shell at a time
(biggest one is 1/4cup). Maybe that would work for filling your
little pee-pee sized ziti (ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!)
rolling eyes.

Big ziplock (or pastry bag) works much better. Fill half the shell
from one end, then fill the other end. No reloading necessary.


Fergot, the dwarf uses his douche bag



Yup...the douche bag that went off - ration in _1946_ \\


Animal feeding syringes are available in many sizes, live stock
farmers use large ones all the time... check at your local Agway.
Assorted capacites for the dwarf:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...k%3Adouche+bag

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2015, 08:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,987
Default manicotti strategy

On Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 1:02:04 PM UTC-5, Sqwertz wrote:
On Tue, 03 Mar 2015 12:23:26 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 20:24:05 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

Sheldon wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:16 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 15:01:54 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:15:03 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.

These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.

Easy to fill pasta tubes or shells with a pet feeding syringe... I
have a collection of different types from various Vets:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eeding+syringe

What a waste of time. Mot even enough to fill one shell at a time
(biggest one is 1/4cup). Maybe that would work for filling your
little pee-pee sized ziti (ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!)
rolling eyes.

Big ziplock (or pastry bag) works much better. Fill half the shell
from one end, then fill the other end. No reloading necessary.

Fergot, the dwarf uses his douche bag


Yup...the douche bag that went off - ration in _1946_ \\


Animal feeding syringes are available in many sizes, live stock
farmers use large ones all the time... check at your local Agway.
Assorted capacites for the dwarf:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...k%3Adouche+bag


Give it up, Pussy Katz. It's a lame idea considering Zip Lock bags
cost less than a nickel and are infinitely easier to fill.

-sw


My little spoon costs even less and washing it I am sure costs less than a ziplock bag.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2015, 08:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18,814
Default manicotti strategy

On Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:08:48 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 1:02:04 PM UTC-5, Sqwertz wrote:
On Tue, 03 Mar 2015 12:23:26 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 20:24:05 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

Sheldon wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:16 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 15:01:54 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:15:03 -0800 (PST), Kalmia
wrote:

On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 2:09:18 PM UTC-5, l not -l wrote:
On 2-Mar-2015, Kalmia wrote:

I cut them in half, stand the flat end on a cutting board, then use a tiny
spoon with which I fill em like an ice cream cone. They are easier to
handle when filling, easier to remove from the baking dish, and at a
potluck, maybe ppl will take fewer and leave some for the next guy.

I put the filling in a zip lock bag, snip off one corner. While holding the
shell in one hand, I squeeze the filling from the bag into the shell.

These aren't shells- they're tubes. Shells are harder to stuff - hard to hold open, so I rarely use shells.

Easy to fill pasta tubes or shells with a pet feeding syringe... I
have a collection of different types from various Vets:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eeding+syringe

What a waste of time. Mot even enough to fill one shell at a time
(biggest one is 1/4cup). Maybe that would work for filling your
little pee-pee sized ziti (ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!)
rolling eyes.

Big ziplock (or pastry bag) works much better. Fill half the shell
from one end, then fill the other end. No reloading necessary.

Fergot, the dwarf uses his douche bag


Yup...the douche bag that went off - ration in _1946_ \\

Animal feeding syringes are available in many sizes, live stock
farmers use large ones all the time... check at your local Agway.
Assorted capacites for the dwarf:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...k%3Adouche+bag


Give it up, Pussy Katz. It's a lame idea considering Zip Lock bags
cost less than a nickel and are infinitely easier to fill.

-sw


My little spoon costs even less and washing it I am sure costs less than a ziplock bag.


A cookie press works too.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Iced coffee strategy: yours? Kalmia General Cooking 23 02-06-2012 06:55 AM
pizza baking strategy [email protected] General Cooking 6 14-03-2009 06:35 PM
NO Survival strategy object lesson [email protected] Tea 1 06-09-2008 03:27 AM
Bizarre Doritos Marketing Strategy Mark Thorson General Cooking 6 17-05-2007 04:45 PM
Thanksgiving Strategy googlesux Vegan 14 31-10-2003 06:43 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:50 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017